The Yoynich Manuscript

page: 1
1

log in

join

posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 05:54 AM
link   
(I may have popped this in to the wrong section)

The Yoynich Manuscript

The Voynich manuscript is a handwritten book thought to have been written in the 15th or 16th century and comprising about 240 vellum pages, most with illustrations. The author, script, and language remain unknown: for these reasons it has been described as "the world's most mysterious manuscript".

Generally presumed to be some kind of ciphertext, the Voynich manuscript has been studied by many professional and amateur cryptographers, including American and British codebreakers from both World War I and World War II. Yet it has defied all decipherment attempts, becoming an historical cryptology cause célèbre. The mystery surrounding it has excited the popular imagination, making the manuscript a subject of both fanciful theories and novels: numerous possible authors have been suggested for it.

In 2009, University of Arizona researchers performed C14 dating on the manuscript's vellum, which they assert (with 95% confidence) was made between 1404 and 1438. In addition, the McCrone Research Institute in Chicago found that much of the ink was added not long afterwards, confirming that the manuscript is indeed an authentic ancient document. However, these results have yet to be published properly, leaving room for continued speculation.

The book is named after the Polish-Lithuanian-American book dealer Wilfrid M. Voynich, who acquired it in 1912. Currently the Voynich manuscript is owned by the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Yale University, and is formally referred to as "Beinecke MS 408". The first facsimile edition was published in 2005.

Source: Terence McKenna - 1/3 - The Voynich Manuscript

www.youtube.com...
edit on 16-1-2011 by bluemirage5 because: no reason




posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 07:33 AM
link   
I'm running off of about a 15% charge of morning coffee (still loading) so my memory isn't quite as dull as it usually is - it's even duller, but here goes.
I remember a brief period of time where I was researching this book, and I think that several people had concluded that the images and maps in it pertained to some sort of ancient turkish bath house. I may be wrong. I probably am, but please don't throw scalding water on me...that's as much as I remember.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 08:26 AM
link   
reply to post by sykickvision
 


I think it has to do more with the fountain of youth, astronomy, and the plant matter in the diagrams could be the answer to some medical advancement.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 08:38 AM
link   
Why is the entire text of your post copied from Wikipedia? (See Original Article) You need to cite sources with a link and an 'ex' tag.

Beyond what is posted on Wikipedia, what are your thoughts on this?



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 08:44 AM
link   
reply to post by adjensen
 


There is a link to Youtube videos on this manuscript. I only found out about this today and I'm still researching to learn more.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 08:59 AM
link   

Originally posted by bluemirage5
reply to post by adjensen
 


There is a link to Youtube videos on this manuscript. I only found out about this today and I'm still researching to learn more.


I missed the video link, but I don't watch them anyway.

Based on the Wikipedia article, which is as much effort as I'd put into this, my guess would be the work of an imaginative, but damaged, mind. It reminds me a bit (conceptually, not the content,) of the works of Henry Darger, who wrote and illustrated a 15,000 page novel that no one knew about until after his death.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 09:17 AM
link   
Vellum was very expensive in the days of the Voynich so it would not have been wasted.
I actually saw a link to this on Debbiewins.com. At the time Debbie's row boats were only moored at the bow and were free to swing and point into the wind.

Debbie upgraded her site BTW and its beginning to look like Andrew Wyeth's painting Christina's world..

www.debbiewins.com...



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 09:18 AM
link   
This is really cool. I've never heard of the manuscript before but you can view it all online at the Yale library:


Yoynich Manuscript Online
edit on 16-1-2011 by Boreas because: edit: fixed link



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 10:04 AM
link   
There is another good thread on ATS here:

The Voynich Manuscript partially decoded

I'm not sure if you have a typo or if there are variations on spelling, but I've only seen it as "Voynich".



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 10:19 AM
link   
reply to post by Boreas
 


I could not get your link to work; here is one I grabbed from back-spacing and redirecting the search for MS-408

MS-408 Images



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 10:19 AM
link   
I suggest you read "History Is Wrong" By Erick Von Daniken. He goes into great lengths about this manuscript and how it may tie into other stange and unusual manuscripts throughout history. This is the synopsis of the book

Synopsis

Erich von Däniken again shows his flair for revealing the truths that his contemporaries have missed. After closely analyzing hundreds of ancient and apparently unrelated texts, he is now ready to proclaim that human history is nothing like the world religions claim-and he has the proof!

In History Is Wrong, Erich von Däniken takes a closer look at the fascinating Voynich manuscript, which has defied all attempts at decryption since its discovery, and makes some intriguing revelations about the equally incredible Book of Enoch.


For more see link search.barnesandnoble.com...:referralid=1ffae6 e2-218c-11e0-b21a-001b2166c2c0



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 10:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by Greensage
reply to post by Boreas
 


I could not get your link to work; here is one I grabbed from back-spacing and redirecting the search for MS-408

MS-408 Images


Yea I noticed and went back and fixed it. Your link is broke too. Must be something with Yale.





new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join