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Hunters: Why do you hunt?

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posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by XLR8R
 


given my hunting experience, or lack there of, I think fishing is a much better idea for me. I killed one deer. 4 pointer. He tasted incredibly good, but then again, so did the last steak I ate. I will wait until I can't find a steak before I go out again. BTW, I smoke salmon and trout. I would love to hear how Walleye is smoked. If you find anyone who does that, please let me know.




posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


Your right about the steak thing. I love smokes trout. I never smoked walleye though. But my budy says it's good. Bellow is a link to something simular to what he does. I dip my walleye in egg white and batter it with BBQ chip crumbs...
It kind of defeats the perpose for a healthy meal but sure hits the spot.

Smoked Wall Eye



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 12:23 PM
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Dang it now I got to get my fishing license renewed thanks a lot for bringing up walleye!! Possibly the best eating fish there is out there.



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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There was a good line in the 1990s TV show "Northern Exposure".
One of the characters was asked about how it feels to kill something as a hunter.

the character replied:

"The killing was the best part. It was the dying I couldn't take."

Our animalistic side of us still may get a thrill from the kill (probably back to our hunt for survival days), but our emotional side of us finds it hard to watch something die without feeling some form of compassion.


edit on 1/17/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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The thrill of the hunt...Adrenaline.

Its called the narrowed down version of the answer without getting too brainified with it



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Dont hunt animals -too innocent have fished

Mayby dark energies tho -demons-. Fair game!
how sweet they are!
edit on 1/17/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by Golf66


This is what I was addressing earlier; we created a problem in the eco system in the first place by encroaching on all the apex predators’ areas. Not that we need to change that or whatever like some Agenda 21 BS just a fact of life we need room.

However, now we will necessarily have to assume the role of the apex predator or the herds will suffer in many ways. I leave the predators alone; I lose a chicken to a hawk now and then and every once in a while one to an owl. I tend to leave them alone because without them the mouse population around here would be out of control.

Even heard about a few bobcats and once a black bear in the area – I would never kill one unless absolutely necessary. Hell, even if I lost stock I’d rather that as long as it wasn’t excessive and I could scare them off rather than kill them.

Likewise we created other problems like in the south with feral hogs - just regular hogs got free somehow and mixed with wild boar. Now the agressiveness of the smaller wild boar is mixed with the large frame of the domestic hog - not a good combination.

They breed fast and are very destructive to crops and farmland - almost can't kill them fast enough. Some places the wildlife management just rounds them up at feed sites 15-20 at a time and takes them to the slaughterhouse and donates to the needy.



Golf 66,

I too would not like to kill an animal for which I was not going to eat. I have done so but because they became a pest and nuisance..but had I another way to discourage them I would have done so.
I have been trapping raccoons in and around my garage of late and then releasing them out in the country. Made my own drop/sliding gate trap as well. The little buzzards seem to be able to get into just about anything. They can be quite a pest. Very cute when they are small but they quickly don't remain the same.

At the same time I am aware that many of these are wild animals..they do not think or analyze as do we.
At times I believe many people think and analyze themselves through some narrow prisms and are not aware of the big picture. In their comfort zone so to speak.

Indeed the problem with the feral pigs in the south seems to be a big one in areas and rapidly expanding.
Not letting them go to waste and donating them to the needy is a good idea..but understand they can barely handle the breeding problem. They are moving out into new territory and rapidly.

Soylent Green is People,

you posted,

There was a good line in the 1990s TV show "Northern Exposure".
One of the characters was asked about how it feels to kill something as a hunter.

the character replied:

"The killing was the best part. It was the dying I couldn't take."

Our animalistic side of us still may get a thrill from the kill (probably back to our hunt for survival days), but our emotional side of us finds it hard to watch something die without feeling some form of compassion.


Do you have any experience or knowledge in this arena outside of a move or television program you have watched?? Feelings and emotions which may not be your own but transplanted from and through someone else??

I can assure you that there are people out here who can stow and manage their emotions while and after killing another animal. I can also assure you that animals can stow and manage their emotions while killing and even playing with another animal unto death.
Not everyone out here lives a television/movie life behind a remote controller or a telephone keypad or even a computer keypad.
I thought that in contrast that you might want to know this information's. Feel goodism is just that ..feel goodism.
It is often not based in practical reality for those who must live and experience it..not watch it vicariously on television or in the movies.

While I don't like killing animals..I am also very much aware of what it means to deal with and be around wild animals..even some two legged wildlife. I know some people who don't hunt but are as much if not more "Wildlife" as the animals out here in the woods. I don't even like being around them.

To those who want to be vegetarians ..bon appetit. No problem with me...none of my business. I don't tell someone on what to spend or not spend their monies or labors. When I get a case of MREs I give the vegetarian ones to my friend and coworker on the job.

To those who want to hunt no problem once again. None of my business as well.



Thanks,
Orangetom
edit on 17-1-2011 by orangetom1999 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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reply to post by orangetom1999
 


I was not preaching "feel goodisms" to hunters with the quote from the TV show -- I was just simply stating that all humans (you, me, and most everyone else with the right amount of chromosomes) have an animalistic side that still feels a thrill for killing for survival's sake AND the side that feels some form -- and I did use the phrase "some form" on purpose -- of compassion for the animal.

That "thrill of the hunt" side of us is just as vital to our survival as the side of us that feels "some level" of compassion for the dead animal.

By the way...
I'm by no means a vegan or even a vegetarian. I eat meat; I enjoy eating meat. If you read one of my previous posts (on the previous page) I called myself a hypocrite because I like eating the meat, but I don't want to be the one who kills the meat I eat -- let someone else get their [figurative] "hands dirty" with the killing, while I reap the benefits of eating, without me needing to consciously think about the fact that the animal was once a living thing.

I admit I am hypocritical in that respect. But I think many people are just like me -- they would feel bad killing an animal that they see alive, but have no issue with eating that same animal if someone else killed it.


edit on 1/17/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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I hunt to survive, and few other reasons.
1. Animals taken from nature have no added chemicals such as hormones
2. They are free range as it can get, they do not live a tortured existance
3. 25 cents for one bullet can provide 100-200 pounds of fresh meat. A super market cannot beat that deal!
4. Beef is not the best meat out there taste wise
5. Why I should work at a job just so I can live like a slave when almost all food can be had for free?

and my most favorite reason, I love grilling, and do it rain or shine even in the winter when it gets -10F. There is no fast food or restuarant equivilant to ground deer and boar made into a burger patty, topped with boar bacon strips, with fresh maple syrup drizzled on top, nestled between two pieces of french toast as a bun.

I sould also mention, I never have experienced "buck feaver". All I think is "man this going to grill up great". No real positive or negative emotion. I don't get why it would be exciting as the animals are pretty dumb, and it's pretty easy(at least here Michigan).
edit on 1/17/2011 by LordBaskettIV because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 03:41 AM
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Venison jerky is so good,so is kangaroo, PETA = People Eating Tasty Animals.



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 06:02 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 



I was not preaching "feel goodisms" to hunters with the quote from the TV show -- I was just simply stating that all humans (you, me, and most everyone else with the right amount of chromosomes) have an animalistic side that still feels a thrill for killing for survival's sake AND the side that feels some form -- and I did use the phrase "some form" on purpose -- of compassion for the animal.


I have taken the lives of a goodly number of animals. There was no thrill in it. Most of it was for food. Purpose yes...thrill no.
I often feel more compassion for some four legged animals than do I two legged human "Wildlife." Not much use for two legged wildlife. But that is just me. I can be very unsocial and make no excuses for it. I dont care if the world approves of how I think on this or not. That is just me.

However..I am not a vegetarian. It does not bother me if others are so. I dont judge them on this..it is none of by business if they choose to be vegetarians. Just as it is none of my business if one chooses to hunt or not hunt.


Thanks for your post and clarification,
Orangetom



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 07:03 AM
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I don't hunt. However, I have slaughtered a few farm animal for food over the years. I did it because I felt that morally I could no longer eat meat unless I was willing to get some blood on my hands. It doesn't sound rationale to some. To me, it made perfect sense.

The first animal I ever slaughterd for food was a young goat. My friend from Ghana showed me how his tribe historically slaughtered animals for food. It was a very respectful approach and made the whole event more about communing with nature.

I just have this weird belief that if you aren't willing to take your own animal at least once you shouldn't eat meat. There is a certain sacrifice laid down by the animal and it passes on a responsibility to you.



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 09:15 AM
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I think having to 'hunt' your own food, reminds you of your humble place in the world. Taking a life for your own 'living' is a reminder of 'life must have life' to live....you truly are having to see and go through the process of gathering your own meat...very unlike going to the store and getting meat where we dont really think about this 'life' had to be given to us, for our 'life'.

I believe there is a 'thanks' to life...between a true hunter for the hunted. Even as its cleaned and cooked, reminders are there of the 'worth' of life itself.

Trophy hunting is something I frown on. Use all that you can from an animal...only kill what you will eat or can offer to another for food.

Something that makes me sad is when we go to the river bank....we see so many fish that are just left there, un used and not even thrown back to the water. If you fish and you are not going to use the fish you catch, put them back into the water.

Respect the laws of hunting....I think the laws cover alot of good guidelines to follow.

Something I enjoy for 'deer' is to cook it in a outside pit, with what nature also provides. You can build 2 pits with stones....one to make your 'coals' from good wood...and another to place the coals in, to place under your meat for it to cook. It takes almost a full day for it to cook and to me, this is also a reminder of what 'nature' offers us, that we so much forget to give reverence to.

I think its wise as well, to know how to survive with nature, outside of our modern day system.

Some will gain pride in hunting...some will gain a humility in natures greatness.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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Some of the reasons I hunt are:
#1 For food. Last year I didn't get a deer but my father did. He gave us half of his deer meat. My wife and I ate venison every night for dinner for half a year! A whole deer depending on size would last a whole year. I did get a turkey and a bunch of pheasants though which lasted a few months.
#2 Knowing where my food comes from and connecting with nature. Most people today are detached from where their food comes from and from nature in general. You can go buy a hamburger but do you realize something had to die in order for you to have said hamburger? I feel a connection with nature and the cycle of life every time I hunt, something primitive that is hard to explain unless you experience it. Plus I know that the animal I killed wasn't cloned, given growth hormones, antibiotics, or slaughtered in an inhumane fashion unless all those hormones, antibiotics and junk seeped into the environment but still less of a chance than commercial meat.
#3Cost. $27.50 for a hunting license. About a dollar a bullet or so give or take. Its a few more dollars for arrows unless you make your own. One deer is a lot of meat not to mention other game species. For a 100 lbs deer that would be about $0.30 a pound doing your own butchering.

That is a few reasons as to why I hunt.

As for sport hunters I believe they give hunting in general a bad name. A lot of them don't seem to realize the value of life. I am always a little sad when I kill an animal but at the same time I understand that life feeds on life. I always thank my animal brother for given its life so I can eat and give an offering of tobacco. Everything we eat, make clothes out of, or build with, animal or plant, is alive and has a consciousness just like you and me. With that said I just don't understand not feeling empathy for everything. Seeing the animal as an object, something to hang on the wall, to measure yourself by and brag to your friends just doesn't make sense to me and never did.

Just some food for thought.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by Golf66
 


I totally respect your choices.

I'm not trying to claim that I have any answers but I'm pretty sure that if there is a better way going about having meat, your's is definitely closer to the correct way. It just feels very wrong to see people disconnect from the entire process of butchering animals for consumption, they see animals as just another commodity to the point where factory workers abuse them without any care.

They live, they breathe and they feel pain... people seem to forget that.



posted on Nov, 28 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Fishing is the other kind of hunting, so why do you fish?



posted on Dec, 3 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by SouthernPride
reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Fishing is the other kind of hunting, so why do you fish?


As I said in ops. I have no kinship towards non-mammals, and especially those living underwater (fish). Don't get me wrong, I don't hate fish or anything, I just see them as sort of wiggling apples...meant strictly for food or art.

I fish because they are tasty and I have no issue at all with killing a non-mammal for purposes of food
I am also not slamming hunting for food or resources in general..the questioning I was doing in this was for "sports" hunters whom do it out of the love for murdering lesser lifeforms. The one that goes and takes down a deer, then gives all the meat away to friends because they don't particularly care for it, just wanted to shoot an animal.

I know sports fishermen whom don't go for the food aspect..will say they don't bother me as much. they catch the fish, then toss em back. I don't comprehend it personally, but at least they are not going for the death aspect.



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