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Mammoth 'could be reborn in four years' (Cloning)

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posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:19 AM
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The woolly mammoth, extinct for thousands of years, could be brought back to life in as little as four years thanks to a breakthrough in cloning technology.




Previous efforts in the 1990s to recover nuclei in cells from the skin and muscle tissue from mammoths found in the Siberian permafrost failed because they had been too badly damaged by the extreme cold. But a technique pioneered in 2008 by Dr. Teruhiko Wakayama, of the Riken Centre for Developmental Biology, was successful in cloning a mouse from the cells of another mouse that had been frozen for 16 years.


Source




posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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The main question on my mind is what they plan to do with these cloned woolly mammoths after successfully recreating them.

Will they release them into the wild?

Will them put them in a zoo and make millions from the publicity?

If they release they into the wild it could obviously have drastic effects.

If they make money from playing god that is also bad in my opinion.

I haven't really got too much to say on this controversial issue but I thought that I would share it with you guys anyway.
edit on 26/10/2010 by TechUnique because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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WOW! For some reason I thought this was done years ago! Well, I guess that means I have something (more) to look forward too!

I'd love to see one of these things ALIVE...

That is, as long as it has a mate (if they're anything like elephants they're VERY social and need a herd), and, if it's left alone and not poked and prodded like a science experiment.

Oh wait, it is a science experiment.

Well bummer...

Anyone up for kidnapping it with me and turning it out FREE in the wild?

peace



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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What.... The..... Hell...... Didn't these fools watch jurrassic park. What are they thinking?



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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In my opinion things go extinct for a reason.
We shouldn't be playing around with nature if its extinct it is meant to be.



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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What use to man is a hairy elephant?

edit on 13/1/11 by lektrofellon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
What.... The..... Hell...... Didn't these fools watch jurrassic park. What are they thinking?

You do realize they're trying to bring back a plant-eating hairy elephant?
Not quite the threat of a Tyrannosaurus; though I'm sure someone, somewhere aspires to be the real life John Hammond.

While I don't think reanimating all the extinct species of the earth is a good idea, we can learn quite a lot from a few of them.


Plus, I bet mammoth burgers are tasty.



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by scorrick
 


They were most likely hunted to extinction by us.....
Whole herds would be chased over cliffs to feed a small tribe.
Hardly meant to be....
89% of the Megafauna(large animals) were hunted to extinction after the beiring land bridge allowed the 'native' americans to come here..



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by eNumbra
 


While I'm (mostly) for bringing back the woolly mammoth (if we do it properly, and bring back a whole shedload of 'em and set em loose in siberia), you do realise that it's not unheard of for an elephant to tear people limb from limb, do you?

Elephants are very intelligent, very social, and very big. Part of being very social is that they hold grudges - against the human race, from time to time - for long past deeds. A few years back there was an elephant in the lower zambesi killed a couple of women who were setting (camp)fires. Chased them down and scattered the pieces. Not to mention that America hanged an elephant (I really do mean that) in the 20th century for killing six people at a zoo.

So while I disagree that it's jurassic park, ooh, argh, the mammoth will be going out eating everybody, elephants do demand caution, and I think it would be sensible to apply the same caution to their relatives.

EDIT: By the way, to those who think that mammoths would be out of place in today's world, do remember that some may have stuck around on the faro isles until not long before Jesus, and the far north of asia still sees the impacts of the mammoth in its remaining steppes. If we put them back, the world might as well have just blinked and missed their absence.
edit on 13/1/2011 by TheWill because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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The wooly mammoth was extinct by human and it wouldn't be a problem to bring them back into the wild.
With it you could also see them as very big sheep. All that wool wow.



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by eNumbra
 


I agree with TKDRL. We're talking an animal we know nothing about. We don't know it's behaviour, habitat, niche, foods it eats, how much waste it excretes, behaviour patterns, mating rituals.

We're talking about bring back an animal that died off, and may yet die again. It played a certain role thousands of years ago, bringing it back would most likely leave it as a zoo attraction because it couldn't survive elsewhere.

And obviously you never read Jurassic Park. It had a lot more to it in the book. In the book Compsognathus was more than just a scavanger. It did feed off dead animals, but it would hunt as well. It's saliva also has a similar poison to that of a Cobra because of it's habitual feeding of dead flesh and consuming bacteria.

What the scientists thought merely was a Turkey Vulture turned into a Brown Recluse.
edit on 13-1-2011 by Xen0m0rpH because: derpy sentence

edit on 13-1-2011 by Xen0m0rpH because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by DutchBigBoy
The wooly mammoth was extinct by human.


Originally posted by nivekronnoco
They were most likely hunted to extinction by us.....
89% of the Megafauna(large animals) were hunted to extinction after the beiring land bridge allowed the 'native' americans to come here..
Most likely according to who? I used to think that too, but did you know that that the clovis people were wiped out in the same event that wiped out the other megafauna?

Several species of megafauna and even a human population called the "clovis people" named after a unique type of weapon they used all went extinct, it's thought possibly from some natural disaster.

Study links mammoth extinction


A swarm of comets that smacked North America 12,900 years ago wiped out the wooly mammoth and early Native American cultures, according to a soil study released Thursday.

The report in the journal Science focuses on tiny "nanodiamonds," crystals tied to past comet impacts, at six sites across the continent in a soil layer dated to the start of a 1,300-year-long ice age.

Geologists and archaeologists have long argued about what caused the extinction of dozens of large North American "megafauna" species, such as saber-toothed cats and mammoths. ..

the impact date coincides with the abrupt halting of deposits of "Clovis" Native American artifacts, distinctively fluted tools and arrowheads. Dozens of large animal species vanished then in North America.
I think the "hunted to extinction" theory is based on speculation, the impact theory is based on evidence and fact.



edit on 13-1-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by Xen0m0rpH
I agree with TKDRL. We're talking an animal we know nothing about. We don't know it's behaviour, habitat, niche, foods it eats, how much waste it excretes, behaviour patterns, mating rituals.
We don't know mating rituals but we do know some of that other stuff like what it eats, habitat, etc. We've found some specimens so well preserved (frozen)they still have food in their stomach so we can tell what they were eating before they died.

I'm not so sure we should bring them back though. Sure it's not T-Rex, but it will just become another endangered species that will go extinct again. If they just want to make one specimen, and not breed them, then I wouldn't object to that from a scientific study basis, though from a humanitarian basis, there may be reason to object if they are social animals and the single specimen would die of loneliness.



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by Xen0m0rpH
reply to post by eNumbra
 

And obviously you never read Jurassic Park.



Should I take a picture of the copy sitting on my bookshelf?

Besides; you don't need to read a work of fiction to know anything about the dinosaurs featured in it.


Originally posted by TheWill
reply to post by eNumbra
 


While I'm (mostly) for bringing back the woolly mammoth (if we do it properly, and bring back a whole shedload of 'em and set em loose in siberia), you do realise that it's not unheard of for an elephant to tear people limb from limb, do you?


But it's quite unheard of for Elephants to hunt and devour meat.

Any animal can be dangerous under the right circumstances, but I'll take an herbivore over a carnivore any day.
edit on 1/13/2011 by eNumbra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
What.... The..... Hell...... Didn't these fools watch jurrassic park. What are they thinking?


Lmaoo. i gotta agree, you kno these guys wont stop at just the mammouth. Might as well stop it before it starts



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 05:46 AM
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reply to post by eNumbra
 


Again, I must qualify that I largely support mammoth cloning, but vis-a-vis your herbivore/carnivore comments, do you know which large animal kills the most people in Africa?

It's not a lion, leopard, crocodile, or python. It's the hippopotamus.

A herbivore.

On a related note, which animal most frequently gives sport hunters their comeuppance and kills them right back?

The african buffalo - also a herbivore.


So while I do see your point in that we wouldn't want to add something above us in the food chain, herbivores can be just as dangerous when they think that you're trying to add them below you on the food chain.



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 05:54 AM
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First thing I pictured was a giant hairy mammoth running through a city goring everything in its path lol. Not getten eaten after wouldn't make me feel any better about that

edit on Fri, 14 Jan 2011 05:55:03 -0600 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 06:25 AM
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It's somewhat amusing to read just how many comments relate to the mammoths dying out in the US as being the great end to the wooley mammoth species. Yes I know everything here must relate to the US... but they really were in Siberia and other places too...

Bring back the wooley mammoth!



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 06:32 AM
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Originally posted by scorrick
In my opinion things go extinct for a reason.
We shouldn't be playing around with nature if its extinct it is meant to be.


Some times that reason for extinction is man and not nature though. Should we not try to fix our mistakes?

I'm not saying the mammoths were us, but things like the thylicene (sp?) etc.
edit on 14-1-2011 by Nutter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 06:55 AM
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Canadians will find use for a wooly elephant for sure.

Can't imagine poor beast living in California with all that hair. or it will shed awfully



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