It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Senators say military cyber ops not disclosed

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 07:11 PM
link   
The Pentagon failed to disclose clandestine cyber activities in a classified report on secret military actions that goes to Congress, according to a Senate document that provides a public peek at ongoing oversight concerns surrounding the government's computer war capabilities.

A brief written exchange between Senate questioners and the Pentagon's assistant secretary for special operations, Michael Vickers, underscores unresolved questions about how and when the Pentagon conducts cyber warfare, and about the guidelines for military action in the event of a computer-based attack on the U.S.

Full story:
hosted2.ap.org...




posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 07:20 PM
link   
reply to post by ckno1
 


This is not really surprising in light of Wikileaks type activity.

Cyber war is a relatively new toy for the military. Like the atom bomb and stealth before it, they want to keep the lid tightly clamped down as long as possible.

They don't want to show thier hand to enemies, real or imaginary.

If these senators make a nuisance of themselves I'm sure a private, closed door, no notes/recordings type meeting can be held for them, but that's all I would expect.

In an age where computers impact every aspect of our lives, admitting to what type of actions they have been preparing for (either defence or offense) is not something that would likely sit well with the public here or abroad.

...especially if backdoors in personal computers are part of that plan.
edit on 12-1-2011 by [davinci] because: Spelling, Form and Content



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 07:48 PM
link   
I thought this was going to be about CYBORGZ!!!

You can bet your ass the black military has 'em...


Oh wait, we aren't supposed to discuss things of such caliber here.

Back to the mundane drama... please, continue.



posted on Jan, 15 2011 @ 07:20 PM
link   
There's a retired US Army Signals Intel officer who got a job on Guam as a professor and teaches local law enforcement how to spy on people with computer "tools".

He posted on the local newspaper website touting how he can see people posting because their computer ports are open and he can see them via their webcams and even listen to them via their computers microphones.

He was so brazen he boasted about it on a news website where people post comments. No punishment for violating peoples privacy....but then he has the audacity to be mad that he isn't being promoted by his peers at the university.....

They won't disclose it because it's corrupt and inefficient. Many are using their powers to get themselves off spying on Americans who appeal to them sexually.....instead of using their abilities/time for National needs.

It's pathetic...and we're paying for it. People would be mad if they found out. Hence...ahh hush it up. Dat's the good ole boy club...



posted on Jan, 15 2011 @ 09:07 PM
link   
When I first read this topic, I thought you meant Psy-Ops!


I thought that ended in the 70's



posted on Jan, 20 2011 @ 08:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by Cesearesque
When I first read this topic, I thought you meant Psy-Ops!


I thought that ended in the 70's


Why would you believe that Psy-Ops ended in the 1970s? It was just getting legs then.



posted on Jan, 20 2011 @ 08:23 AM
link   
reply to post by HattoriHanzou
 


First, there is a reason these programs are covert. Covert programs are "deniable", meaning there is no association with this program as a function of the US. What the Senator is missing is the possibility of a "clandestine" program, where the actually mission is hidden.

Second, the Senator is in a world of trouble by openly speaking about classified programs. Congress is widely regarded as the last place that can keep a secret, but this Senator is talking about classified programs that are described in a classified document. The problem is nobody is going to prosecute this Senator, that's a fact. The Senator is probably trying to make a name for himself or is seeking funding for a pet project. There is even an outside chance that the Senator has a personal beef with someone on a personal level and is trying to professionally embarrass them, which is often the case on Capitol Hill.

The less said about classified programs the better, in this case. Exacerbating the problem is the Senator has no clue about how to protect the people or programs involved.

..and last, Psychological Operations did not stop in the 1970s, they have been ongoing as a part of the US Army nonstop. There was a name change in 2010, to Military Information Support Activities, to reflect their actual mission. The PSYOP label implied insidious capabilities and missions that just was not true.



posted on Jan, 20 2011 @ 11:43 AM
link   

Originally posted by joelhar
reply to post by HattoriHanzou
 


First, there is a reason these programs are covert. Covert programs are "deniable", meaning there is no association with this program as a function of the US. What the Senator is missing is the possibility of a "clandestine" program, where the actually mission is hidden.

Second, the Senator is in a world of trouble by openly speaking about classified programs. Congress is widely regarded as the last place that can keep a secret, but this Senator is talking about classified programs that are described in a classified document. The problem is nobody is going to prosecute this Senator, that's a fact. The Senator is probably trying to make a name for himself or is seeking funding for a pet project. There is even an outside chance that the Senator has a personal beef with someone on a personal level and is trying to professionally embarrass them, which is often the case on Capitol Hill.

The less said about classified programs the better, in this case. Exacerbating the problem is the Senator has no clue about how to protect the people or programs involved.

..and last, Psychological Operations did not stop in the 1970s, they have been ongoing as a part of the US Army nonstop. There was a name change in 2010, to Military Information Support Activities, to reflect their actual mission. The PSYOP label implied insidious capabilities and missions that just was not true.


You know, I would normally agree with you about classified information remaining secret, but our government loves to classify embarrassing data that has no national security impact. It uses the current classification system as a way to cover massive graft and corruption as often as it uses it to conceal something that should actually remain secret.

Perhaps this whole cyber-war program is in violation of NSD 130 and other orders that make spying on Americans, and using the internet to covertly influence their opinion using propaganda and psychological manipulation illegal. There are many legitimate reasons for leaking details on a classified program, mainly because of the failures of the intelligence community and military to properly classify information.

There's national security, and there's covering your ass because you gave a contract to your half-retarded brother in law.




top topics



 
1

log in

join