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Where do flies go at night?

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posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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Do flies go to another dimension? do they sleep on the underside of leaves? Do they have a big fly nest somewhere?

Where do fly's go at night?




posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:47 PM
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In the summer months they fly around my living room light in a circular motion



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by Paulos
 


Hm thats one answer. But I rarely see that happen in my life. Usually its some other bug around my living room light or hovering around my monitor.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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Good question...is their life like one day long, and then the fly you see tomorrow was just born?

Do they nap?

Maybe they sleep while they're flying around?

WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN???????????



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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Flies rely on heat to move. If you cool one down it will slow down or even stop. I saw this experiment once where some flies were put in the freezer, after they had stopped moving they were attached with glue to a wooden frame that resembled a plane. As they heated back up again they began to move and caused the plane to fly.

Back on track, probably in the grass or on a leaf in a tree



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by Griffo
 


Wow thats very interesting. I do notice if one gets trapped in my house at night, they are very slow and not quick as a fly usually is.

Thanks for the info.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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Flies are like other animals, they need sleep.

Researchers have found that flies actually do go to sleep at night, and there are many interesting facets to these investigations.

Here is a link.

The first reply links the information about the studies conducted on flies sleep habits.

I love learning about stuff like this.

Good question OP. Looks like we have some answers now.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Wow thanks, glad I'm not the only one to wonder this haha.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by Griffo
Flies rely on heat to move. If you cool one down it will slow down or even stop. I saw this experiment once where some flies were put in the freezer, after they had stopped moving they were attached with glue to a wooden frame that resembled a plane. As they heated back up again they began to move and caused the plane to fly.

Back on track, probably in the grass or on a leaf in a tree


Yes flies are cold blooded but that does not explain why their activity decreases at night inside a typical household.

Inside typical households the temperature is above 65 degrees F usually.

The researchers who actually did studies on this subject, determined that flies actually do indeed need to get some sleep every day, just like other animals do.

So the cold blooded aspect can explain why they have lower activity during colder seasons, but in the warmer periods it becomes quite obvious that sleep is the primary cause of lower activity levels.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:03 PM
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bees never sleep,thats why they rely on sweet honey for the sugar



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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Originally posted by brindle
bees never sleep,thats why they rely on sweet honey for the sugar


Many people say bees sleep, others believe they don't technically "sleep".

However, it has been proven that bees become motionless and inactive for durations especially during the night hours, although many of them stay active inside the hive during this period.

Bees do exhibit the same types of regular "inactivity" as do common house flies, and to me this suggests they are sleeping.

A dead give away is when you poke at one that appears to be sleeping. It will have very slow reactions and seem very out of it.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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I believe they flock around my son's aromatic socks and trainers - phew!

But really I dont know the answer.

If they live for only a day maybe they die at night and hatch mornings?



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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In the house they spend the night on the ceiling. So outside I'd assume the go up into the trees, probably on the underside of leaves or branches.
AliWV



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by doobydoll
I believe they flock around my son's aromatic socks and trainers - phew!

But really I dont know the answer.

If they live for only a day maybe they die at night and hatch mornings?


No.

Houseflies live for anywhere between half a month to a full month, depending on conditions.

After a fly lays eggs, it takes around 1 day for the egg to become a maggot.

Usually the maggot phase last about 4days to a week.
Then they turn into "pupae" which is basically a maggot-shaped red or brown hardened shell (cocoon like).
Then finally an adult fly will emerge.

This adult fly can live for several weeks after.

So about a month is the life-span of a fly, roughly.

If you see maggots, you know how long ago the infestation started. Recently, within a few days.
If some of the maggots are motionless and hard red-brown color, you know it's been about a week since the infestation began.

My source for this. housefly wiki



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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Dare I post this answer?
Yup! the truth will set you free!
(entirely "g" rated...)
images.picturesdepot.com...


edit on 12-1-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-1-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-1-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by 46ACE
 


lol



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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Flies can be fun. I made a pet of one some time ago. He used to come down to share my evening meal with me and rest on my arm afterwards while I watched tv. ( When I say share my meal, I'd finished most of it first. He didn't get near it before then
)

Eventually he would go away so I just assumed he'd gone to rest or sleep.

Another fly used to irritate me by buzzing me a lot so I waited until he was sitting quietly on the wall and I crept up behind him and said: bzzzzzztt very loudly. It was fun to see him jump



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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Flys physically must fly all night for survival,hence the term fly by night




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