30 day Linux challenge.

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posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by thehiddentruthseeker
 


Thanks! Im not using Gnome.

I can't keep up with the newest GUI stuff any longer.




posted on Jan, 13 2011 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by TinFoilHatMan55
 


I tried Ubuntu many times in the past, and always had problems with it. Also ran Fedora for years, but they still have an Nvidia driver problem, and I have a new Azus MB with Nvidia chipset. I am not using PC Linux KDE 2010.12, Nvidia drivers installed by default and works great, PCL is stable, ultra fast, and I love it.
www.pclinuxos.com...



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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Originally posted by sixswornsermon
reply to post by thehiddentruthseeker
 


Thanks! Im not using Gnome.

I can't keep up with the newest GUI stuff any longer.

No problems! with so many variations it would be very hard to keep up with the new stuff. that's why threads like this are useful. had been running ufw from terminal for a couple of years before i came across gufw by chance on a forum.



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by autowrench
reply to post by TinFoilHatMan55
 


I tried Ubuntu many times in the past, and always had problems with it. Also ran Fedora for years, but they still have an Nvidia driver problem, and I have a new Azus MB with Nvidia chipset. I am not using PC Linux KDE 2010.12, Nvidia drivers installed by default and works great, PCL is stable, ultra fast, and I love it.
www.pclinuxos.com...



Nvidia drivers are available through restricted hardware drivers under administration. however Ubuntu tends to run better on older machines than cutting edge ones . not tried pcl myself might give it a go to sounds good



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 08:26 AM
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I want to completly step over to Ubuntu.

I am noob.

1 Ive installed Ubuntu via wubi in vista. To get dual boot screen.
2 How do i enlarge memory, i only have 20gig for ubuntu. ?
3 How do i get Utorrent up and running
4 Good media centre, with stream to Ps3 (VLC)
5 Stumble upon
6 The correct drivers for flash based programs.
7 open office?

This is al i need. My vista, and especially fire fox is acting weird.

regmechanic/avira/ad awere/combofic.cc Cleaner. still doesn't work smooth constantly.

Ubuntu hasn't, disappointed me yet, but i want the above questions answered. Then I can design the inner workings just like vista



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by TribeOfManyColours
 


1. Dual booting may cause you more problems than it is worth. Windows does not always play nice with other OS. Just get another HD and use that exclusively for linux. If you need your windows files, get an HARD DRIVE ENCLOSURE and connect by usb.

2. You can use a partition manager like PARTMAN. I would be very careful using these kind of tools though. See above for a safer idea.

3. Why do you want Utorrent so bad? There's already a defult client within Ubuntu, and many others available if you don't like that one. If you really want Utorrent that bad, you could try running it with Wine.

$sudo apt-get install wine

Then, download utorrent installation file to desktop, right click, and open with /usr/bin/wine. It will install Utorrent in a hidden fake c: drive in your home folder. You will need to enable viewing of hidden files to find it. THIS will tell you everything you need to know about Wine. It does not always go smooth, but I have been pleasantly surprised with some programs.

4. I used MEDIATOMB with good success for streaming to XBOX 360 , PS3, and PC.

5. Not sure what Stumbleupon is. Sorry.

6. There is a binary installation package for FlashPlayer available through Adobe. Not sure if you mean something else though.

7. OpenOffice comes installed by default with the newest distribution of Ubuntu.

If your Vista is buggered, you could try to remove any malware - COMBOFIX

Good Luck!
edit on 14-1-2011 by sixswornsermon because: too early to spell correctly



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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Why? And that's the basic issue with Linux. All my programs work. I can download just about anything I want. It's like the old adage, "Why would you jump out of a perfectly working airplane?" Now, you'll jump up and say, "But Windows isn't perfectly working!" and my answer is, "Sure, it is!" I haven't seen a blue screen of death for a decade. Windows 7 works just fine. So did XP. "But, viruses!" and I say, "What viruses?" They've never bothered me. Take basic precautions and you'll be fine.

Now as a Linux aficionado you'll say I'll be much happier. I have to question that. I used Linux in a work environment where Linux was used in several servers. I had to work these servers and had root access, so I'm not unfamiliar with the system. For a user, though, I see no advantage. I'm never been told to "Patch the BIOS in the usual way." or "Just install this Codec." or "Pipe this file to more." I probably don't have to do that with Ubantu, but my point is that the user is a lot closer to the OS in Linux. Then you;ll say, "But it's free!" and I just shrug. I paid $500 for my last laptop, with Windows pre-installed. I don't really need "free."

The real problem here is that your asking me to do work and risk my system. I just don't have to do that. Not only will that take time, it's just not necessary. (People say the same thing about Apple, BTW) And that's why Linux will probably remain a server OS or one that a small group of geeks willing to experiment will adore to the utter bewilderment of anyone else. Linux may make it on slashdot, but nobody in the real world knows what slashdot is.



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


I've been pretty vocal on this thread, but I do tend to agree with you. I have no vested interest in any body converting to Linux. I say use the right tool for the job.

Please consider these points:

1) No BSOD for ten years? I am in disbelief. XP Vista and & have made great strides, but EVERY windows product I have used has BSOD moments from time to time. I know, I know, maybe it's the user, but I don't think so (of course).

2) If I want to swap a working Windows hard drive into another box, then I must jump through hoops. Linux will auto configure its system and just work. No licensing issues. No problems with too many hardware changes. No begging at the alter of Microsoft to activate my installation.

3) In continuance of point # 3, I have worked in corporate IT environments, and helped Grandma with her computer. The gamut, so to speak. 90% of the time, Grandma has either lost her installation disk, or has an OEM installation that did not come with the computer. Yes, I know every trick to fix whatever I encounter, but this presents a huge pain in the ass for me at times, and I am generally lazy! Then, in turn, I lose my ass in labor for Grandma, because I am unwilling to rip her off. Conversely, if a Linux system is toasted, I back up the home directory, then reinstall, then drop it right back in. No registry, no bs. A little config, some updates, done!

4) Server 2003 running IIS serving intranet and file server - best uptime 200 days. Ubuntu 6. something running Apache serving intranet and files - 700+ days until the power turned off in the building. If I were going to build something I didn't want to fail, I would not be using Windows.

5) I'm just a geek. I tear it apart because I can, and I get paid to do so sometimes. I want the least amount of hassle possible. Linux provides me with this.



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Try this thread, check the link in the OP.
Maybe give you some ideas...

Link Here



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 06:43 PM
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There are distros out there that really look just like Windows! I tried this one the other day, too glitzy for me, but the concept will appeal to a lot of people switching from Windows who want some "familiar" looks: Zorin, Ubuntu based, distro.


edit on 14-1-2011 by LadySkadi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by Frogs
 


That also happened to me, but as I was using a virtual machine I just deleted the virtual disk and started over.


I have Ubuntu on a virtual machine to use some Linux/Unix specific software, so my knowledge of all things Linux is limited.



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by sixswornsermon
1) No BSOD for ten years? I am in disbelief. XP Vista and & have made great strides, but EVERY windows product I have used has BSOD moments from time to time. I know, I know, maybe it's the user, but I don't think so (of course).
From what I have seen it's mostly a driver's problem, so if you have good hardware with good drivers you will never have problems.

The computer I am using now had a BSOD once a month (more or less) with Windows Vista, but always after running the HP software checks. I replaced it with Windows 7, did not installed the HP software, and I never had a problem since I did that, 3 months ago.

In the computer I had before this one (one I made with parts chosen by myself) I could even replace the network card with the computer turned on without problems, I only had to be careful not to turn the card while still inside the socket.



4) Server 2003 running IIS serving intranet and file server - best uptime 200 days. Ubuntu 6. something running Apache serving intranet and files - 700+ days until the power turned off in the building. If I were going to build something I didn't want to fail, I would not be using Windows.
Best uptime for two Windows server 2003 servers I manage: 6 years for one and five years for the other, if I ignore power outages and hardware replacements.

The only problem I had with one of those was a bad hard disk.


5) I'm just a geek. I tear it apart because I can, and I get paid to do so sometimes. I want the least amount of hassle possible. Linux provides me with this.
I like to know about my tools, so I learned about the one I use instead of getting a new one.



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Oh yah? Well my OS is better than yours!!!!!






posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 09:10 PM
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Linux... I've often been curious, but wary of trying. I've heard horror stories of dual-boot disk errors.. I don't want to go that route! After some poking around on how to install linux distro onto my 36gb usb drive, I found this:

I'll be taking herd to the warning at the end of this video and giving it a shot.
edit on 14-1-2011 by igigi because: .



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by igigi
 


This is cool, I didn't realize you could do this other than with Puppy and Damn Small Linux, which I tried and found that neither were that easy to figure out and configure to work on both my laptop and netbook, correctly. Might try this, myself but will need to find a smaller distro as I don't have an 8G USB. Something to experiment with, though.

edit on 14-1-2011 by LadySkadi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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Actually browsing ATS while Ubuntu installs onto my flash drive.. Liking the look and feel, especially the little widgets everywhere (multiple desktops, all the typical "i found linux" things
)...

Thought I hit a snag, but it turns out your user name can't start with a capital letter... gogo archaic unix naming conventions....



posted on Jan, 15 2011 @ 12:57 AM
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Ok.. well, there's always the possibility I jacked up the install.. but after successfully installing Ubuntu onto a USB drive I indeed was able to run Ubuntu (persistent, upgradeable) off the usb drive.

Problem is the install effected my disk0 boot manager; without the usb drive plugged in I would be dumped into a grub recovery prompt. I'm sure there's a simple terminal fix, but I said bunk that and decided to fix the MBR myself.

Followed the instructions here for Windows 7 and boom: I'm back in buisness with disk0, but alas, Ubuntu don't load from the usb drive anymore


Format and try again I suppose.. If I figure a fix, I'll let you know, but right now if I can't get the usb drive to act as a "independent computer" I might just nut up and .... grab one of spare hard-drives and give it a proper run.
edit on 15-1-2011 by igigi because: .



posted on Jan, 15 2011 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by igigi
 


Back up plan: Check my post on page one, it gave two links (one for mint and one for ubuntu) in which you can download (either) INTO your windows software packages and run as a windows package (but it will still dual boot, just look at the visuals on the link) in the same manner you would any other windows download.

It can also be uninstalled using the same uninstall process you would for any other windows program. I've tried this via the virtual clone drive (with mint) on my netbook (did not have an optical drive) and it worked fabulous, without ever using the hardrive. Perhaps win/win scenario.



posted on Jan, 15 2011 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by schuyler
Why? And that's the basic issue with Linux. All my programs work. I can download just about anything I want. It's like the old adage, "Why would you jump out of a perfectly working airplane?" Now, you'll jump up and say, "But Windows isn't perfectly working!" and my answer is, "Sure, it is!" I haven't seen a blue screen of death for a decade. Windows 7 works just fine. So did XP. "But, viruses!" and I say, "What viruses?" They've never bothered me. Take basic precautions and you'll be fine.

Now as a Linux aficionado you'll say I'll be much happier. I have to question that. I used Linux in a work environment where Linux was used in several servers. I had to work these servers and had root access, so I'm not unfamiliar with the system. For a user, though, I see no advantage. I'm never been told to "Patch the BIOS in the usual way." or "Just install this Codec." or "Pipe this file to more." I probably don't have to do that with Ubantu, but my point is that the user is a lot closer to the OS in Linux. Then you;ll say, "But it's free!" and I just shrug. I paid $500 for my last laptop, with Windows pre-installed. I don't really need "free."

The real problem here is that your asking me to do work and risk my system. I just don't have to do that. Not only will that take time, it's just not necessary. (People say the same thing about Apple, BTW) And that's why Linux will probably remain a server OS or one that a small group of geeks willing to experiment will adore to the utter bewilderment of anyone else. Linux may make it on slashdot, but nobody in the real world knows what slashdot is.

The only reason i am trying Ubuntu is, that i like change. I like to promote concurrence between developers.
I like to see an end to Microsoft's godlike status

Bill Gates-Microsoft. Starting to get involved with vaccinations etc, must end his reign









posted on Jan, 15 2011 @ 03:06 AM
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Originally posted by igigi
Ok.. well, there's always the possibility I jacked up the install.. but after successfully installing Ubuntu onto a USB drive I indeed was able to run Ubuntu (persistent, upgradeable) off the usb drive.

Problem is the install effected my disk0 boot manager; without the usb drive plugged in I would be dumped into a grub recovery prompt. I'm sure there's a simple terminal fix, but I said bunk that and decided to fix the MBR myself.

Followed the instructions here for Windows 7 and boom: I'm back in buisness with disk0, but alas, Ubuntu don't load from the usb drive anymore


Format and try again I suppose.. If I figure a fix, I'll let you know, but right now if I can't get the usb drive to act as a "independent computer" I might just nut up and .... grab one of spare hard-drives and give it a proper run.
edit on 15-1-2011 by igigi because: .


Burn it Iso on a CD, put cd in and restart.





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