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Prof. MacQueen: Incredible Lecture. First Responder Explosion Testimony

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posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:20 AM
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Another excellent video containing critical evidence and first responder testimony.

Here is an excerpt of two of the documented first responder accounts:

Officer LeClair

Suddenly, there was a monsterous explosion, with extremely high wind and debris, and the lights went out immediately. I was physically picked up and hurled across the concourse, slamming into a wall


Ummm...last time I checked, normal office fires didn't do that to people.

Video 4 of several in the series.




Officer Sue Kain, PAPD & 13 yrs Military

A couple of minutes later, it sounded like bombs going off. That's when the explosions happened...
EACH ONE of those explosions picked me up and threw me...
.


Ummm...last time I checked, normal office fires didn't do that to people either.


Video 4 and 5 of several in the series.



I've watched up to five thus far and it's a very well presented speech. Highly recommended. I'm viewing #6 right now.




posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 07:49 AM
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Thanks for posting these videos. The more lectures like this there are the better. Eventually we may be able to throw some of the most evil people of this era into jail as the truth of 9/11 becomes widely known.

Watching the second of your videos, I finally realized that the reason all the debris was trailing smoke as it fell from the tower, at every level of the tower's disintegration, was probably that burning thermite dust proliferating from cutting charge detonations was reacting with whatever steel it encountered, hence the streams of smoke trailing every assembly of beams as it fell.

This dust is undoubtedly what ignited cars in the neighborhood, burning through engine blocks and corroding surfaces of vehicles in a wide area.

I'm confident that the whole truth of 9/11 will eventually come out. At that time a productive judicial process can finally be initiated on this issue.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 08:03 AM
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Nice try

Why are you listening to a professor of religion describing how a building collapses ?

Describes not an "explosion" but collapse of the towers - the air blast from the falling building was strong
enough to pick up and flip fire apparatus and blow men considerable distances

Kevin Shea of Ladder 35 - blown out of South tower lobby by collapse


Remember being in the South Tower lobby before the collapse. During collapse, I was blown towards Albany and West. Sustained serious injuries including a broken neck and multiple trauma. Crawled 200 feet till surrendered to condition. Was found unconscious at intersection of Albany and West.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by thedman
 


Yes because its only a professor of religion who says that. Sure everybody who does not support the official conspiracy theory can not be trusted. We get it already.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by thedman
 


Why? Because he's a much smarter person than you, and so are the HUNDREDS of witnesses from
which he reads testimonies.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by thedman
Describes not an "explosion" but collapse of the towers - the air blast from the falling building was strong
enough to pick up and flip fire apparatus and blow men considerable distances


Yeah right.

I'm not even going to ask for proof of that because I already know you don't have it. Not that it happened, but that the building "collapse" caused it, prior to the buildings even coming down.


It's obvious from the OP this officer is not talking about the global collapses, but a series of events within one of the buildings.



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 05:53 PM
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reply to post by bsbray11
 


Was at scene last week - 4 buildings on fire. 2 collapsed. Now as the buildings collapsed made lot of noise

Noise which can be described as an "explosion" by many - no sign of an explosives or nano themite, just fire

Buildings made plenty of noise as they came down and continued to do so for considerable time after

No to those who don't get out of mommy basement often - this would sound like an explosion



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by thedman
 


Hey BsBray,

Do you know of any 'noise' that would pick up a person and throw them across a room, slamming them into a wall
as "thedman" suggests?



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by turbofan
Hey BsBray,

Do you know of any 'noise' that would pick up a person and throw them across a room, slamming them into a wall
as "thedman" suggests?


Nope, I don't think him or his firefighter buddies would either.

Those are called "explosions."

And not just aerosol cans.

edit on 12-1-2011 by bsbray11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by thedman
 



Kevin Shea of Ladder 35 - blown out of South tower lobby by collapse


Remember being in the South Tower lobby before the collapse. During collapse, [color=gold]I was blown towards Albany and West. Sustained serious injuries including a broken neck and multiple trauma. Crawled 200 feet till surrendered to condition. Was found unconscious at intersection of Albany and West.


How about a source?

Looks to me the man was involved in an explosion, don’t you think? He is not describing a normal building collapsing. He was blown away.
Were is your proof there were no explosions in the WTC?
You don’t have any.



edit on 12-1-2011 by impressme because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by impressme
 


New York Times Magazine


''Look at that,'' Shea said, suddenly pointing out the opposite window. ''That's Engine 40. That's the rig we drove in on.'' On the side of the road was a huge red truck, the number 40 painted on the side. ''It must've been moved,'' Shea said. ''We weren't parked there.'' He looked at me for reassurance. ''Right?''

As we passed through the final checkpoint, Flaherty said: ''This is it. You're in.''

''There's the south tower,'' said Stacy.

''Where?''

''There. By the crane.''

''Oh, my God,'' Shea said.

All we could see was a giant hole in the sky. We parked the car and climbed out. Flaherty got us hard hats and yelled at us to be careful as we approached the debris.

''Where's the lobby command post?'' asked Shea.

''Ten stories underground,'' Flaherty said. ''It's still burning.''

Shea opened and closed his eyes. He began to recall all the pieces that he had strung together, his words flowing out faster and faster. ''I grabbed a Purple K,'' he said. ''I was going to look for my men in Ladder 35. There were bodies falling. I remember them hitting the ground. I remember the sound. I went to put out car fires. Then I went into the command post. I saw Patriciello.'' He closed his eyes. ''I hugged him. I told him to be careful.''

He stopped. How could he have gotten from the lobby command post to Albany Street? He couldn't run that fast. ''Maybe you were blown out,'' Flaherty said. ''A lot of guys were picked up and blown out from the concussion.''

''Where's Albany?'' Shea asked.

''It's over here,'' Flaherty said. We started to run, mud splattering on our shoes. We turned down a small street. There were cars still covered in ash, their windows shattered. Shea said the doctor told him he had crawled 200 feet toward light, and now he walked several paces, then stopped and turned around. ''This is where they found me,'' he said. ''Right here.'' He looked back at the tower, surveying the distance. ''Is there a garage around here?'' There was one up the road, Liam said, and we ran again, past a burned-out building and several men in surgical masks. ''This must be it,'' Shea said.



Definite phrase


He stopped. How could he have gotten from the lobby command post to Albany Street? He couldn't run that fast. ''Maybe you were blown out,'' Flaherty said. ''A lot of guys were picked up and blown out from the concussion.''



As he finished his story, drawing new theories from Flaherty about being blown out, estimating the wind speed and the power of the concussion, we were all cold and exhausted. By the time we got back to the site, it was dark, and the workers had turned on their spotlights. While the others wandered off, Shea walked toward what was left of the south tower.




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