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Alexander the Great's tomb located?

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posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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Iuka Man Wants County Help in Finding Potential Hidden Ancient Treasures
1/5/11 @ 12:38:41 pm



Harry Hubbard uses a map to show the Marion County Board's Community Relations Committee the location of the cave where he believes the ancient tomb of Alexander the Great may be located.
An Iuka man who believes the lost Tomb of Alexander the Great may be located in Romine Township in extreme southeast Marion County encouraged the county board's Community Relations Committee Tuesday night to pursue development of the site a tourist attraction.

wjbdradio.com...

My girlfriend told me about this after work. I am in southern Illinois and want to know what you think.
edit on 7-1-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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I have to leave for a bit. I will be back after a while. There have been reports of ancient artifacts found all over southern Illinois.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


Does Illinois have an alternative calendar where April 1st falls early?



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Isn't Marion county in Oregon? I tought Alexander the great was buried in Alexandria, Egypt.
I wonder how this Harry Hubbard guy came to this wonderful conclusion.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Some say he is buried in the Siwai Oasis other's in different parts, but he is not in Oregon. Here is a good article for you on the subject and one of pretentious debate though: www.archaeology.org...



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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The first link doesn't work, so I googled for references to this story. Here's a summary of the longer story:
www.carmitimes.com...

Here's the story, with pictures of some of the "artifacts" he said he found:
wjbdradio.com...

It's a pretty obvious and badly done fake.

So -- how can you tell when material is faked?

Take a look at the "picture" (in rock) of "Alexander the Great", and let's talk a few facts about Alexander:
* He's actually Macedonian: en.wikipedia.org...
* He conquered most of the then "known world"
* He died in 323 BC
* He wrote and spoke Greek.
* Macedon before (and after) Alexander was a small country within today's country of Greece: Map of ancient Macedon
* a lot more details are here: www.answers.com...

So... first item -- the drawing on the rock is really badly done. There wasn't a lot of time for casual art back then -- art was done by studios with trained artists. This wasn't done by anyone from the Macedonian or Roman culture and sure wasn't done by a professional artist.

There's a number of real coins minted during his lifetime with his portrait on them. In all of them, he's bare-headed and has curly hair (here's a good drawing of one of these coins.) Drawing of Alexander on commemorative coin

Macedonians didn't wear pots with buns on their heads when they went to war. He wore a standard Greek helmet with a horsetail brush (in metal) -- replica is here: What Macedonian Helmets look like

He would not have worn a fake Egyptian style collar -- he wore a bronze curass which showed him as having a manly torso. You can see a drawing of one on the arms reference page here:
Armor worn by Macedonian generals

Under NO circumstances would he have worn a braided "duck tail" ponytail. And triangle earrings with pierced ears? Worn to battle, where they could snag on everything? No. No warrior goes around in harem lady earrings.

The second item -- a badly faked Egyptian piece. It is probably supposed to be either Alexander as a king after he conquered Egypt or some such, but instead shows an "Egyptian" wearing something that tries to be the "White crown" (Hedjet) of Upper Egypt -- in other words, the part of Egypt closest to Nubia and the source of the Nile. Alexander never got that far into Egypt. He's shown on several Egyptian monuments (see here: Alexander conquers Egypt ) and is wearing the "Khepresh" -- the War crown ( The War Crown worn by Alexander) He's supposed to be holding an ankh (but it has too many cross branches... kind of like an ankh and a djed combined -- and no one ever held the ankh by the "handle" -- they hold it by the loop) and is supposed to be holding a staff (which looks nothing like any staff of office ever held by any Egyptian) and is seated in a position no Egyptian would have drawn (they would draw both legs together.)

The third item is of a type familiar to anyone who studies fakes. It's a rock with a "mysterious language" that only the finder can translate. The caption reports it as "Hubbard says this rock contains an ancient Latin language that shows the stone is from someone of European descent"

The only ancient Latin language being written at or after the time of the death of Alexander the Great is (I hope you won't be shocked) Latin. en.wikipedia.org... The earliest form of written Latin came from 500 BC -- far too early for them to have heard about Alexander the Great's death in 323 BC -- and even then they were writing in regular Latin letters, not mocked-up Phoenician. So compare the letters to the Phoenician alphabet (wjbdradio.com...) and the old classic "witches' alphabet" (www.christian-restoration.com...)

Finally, we know it's not actually a language that's written there although the article says "Hubbard has translated three European based languages on some of the artifacts, confirming the remains are not from American Indians." When you're writing a language, letters repeat at some frequency (count the number of 'e's in the last sentence or 'i's or 's's or other letters and you'll see what I mean.)

The bottom of the rock image shows a long line with marks hashed below it. Here he's trying to fake Ogham. This is particularly amusing since Ogham doesn't originate until around 400 AD (some 700 years after Alexander's demise: en.wikipedia.org...

...and it's not real Ogham.

So someone's trying to run a hoax (besides, Alexander is buried in the Middle East. There were actually some battles fought over where his final tomb would be. It's a fair guess that Ptolemy ended up with it, though it's not certain.
edit on 7-1-2011 by Byrd because: to make the links look nice



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
So someone's trying to run a hoax (besides, Alexander is buried in the Middle East. There were actually some battles fought over where his final tomb would be. It's a fair guess that Ptolemy ended up with it, though it's not certain.
www.touregypt.net...
edit on 7-1-2011 by Byrd because: (no reason given)


I'm pretty sure whoever ended up with it never brought Alexander's body to Marion county Oregon.
And if they somehow managed to bring him up here, he would be in the money pit on Oak Island lol.

Nice research btw!

edit on 7-1-2011 by Jigore because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by Jigore
I'm pretty sure whoever ended up with it never brought Alexander's body to Marion county Oregon.
And if they somehow managed to bring him up here, he would be in the money pit on Oak Island lol.

Nice research btw!

edit on 7-1-2011 by Jigore because: (no reason given)


Thanks.


The story of the quarrels over Alexander's body is a really interesting story for history buffs. There's documentation of it... I like to think that old Ptolemy ended up with it, although the "prophecy" sure didn't pan out for him!



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
So... first item -- the drawing on the rock is really badly done. There wasn't a lot of time for casual art back then -- art was done by studios with trained artists. This wasn't done by anyone from the Macedonian or Roman culture and sure wasn't done by a professional artist.


I'll agree with everything you say except this!
I have probably misunderstood what you said or you worded it badly? What you are saying here implies that pre Macedonian or Roman peoples didn't have time to create art...



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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It is not in Oregon, It is in Illinois.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


I really like your research. I did not have the time to really check up on it. I thought this was interesting because it is in the midwest of all places. If the guy really hoaxed it, then that is all on him. Thank you for the info.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


You see people this is how to DENY IGNORANCE!

Byrd amazing job, and all you people who just star and flag before you see the kind of scrutiny that goes on need to hide yo kids, hide yo wife, and hide yo husband cause they denying ignorance out here!



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by binomialtheorem
 


I had my doubts, but you never know. This is why I posted the question mark after the headline. This is not ignorance. The guy says he knows where the tomb is. He is probably wrong, but this is what this site is for isn't it? Deny your own ignorance.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:52 PM
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Originally posted by liejunkie01
reply to post by binomialtheorem
 


I had my doubts, but you never know. This is why I posted the question mark after the headline. This is not ignorance. The guy says he knows where the tomb is. He is probably wrong, but this is what this site is for isn't it? Deny your own ignorance.


I didn't specifically say you did I.

I was regarding people who just star and flag without even trying to give some effort in making sure it is right or wrong. If you think I was referring to you then you are sadly mistaken.But if you felt insulted, I am sorry and I apologize.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by binomialtheorem
 


But you posted that in my thread. Therefore you added your comment that had nothing to do with the story. And the last time I checked, it is spelled your, not yo.
edit on 7-1-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by binomialtheorem
 


I am also sorry for the hostility, but I get tired of some people on here thinking tht they know everything. My bad, and I took it the wrong way.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by liejunkie01
reply to post by binomialtheorem
 


But you posted that in my thread. Therefore you added your comment that had nothing to do with the story. And the last time I checked, it is spelled your, not yo.
edit on 7-1-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)


I was congratulating another member on displaying his, or her, scrutiny of a source. I wasn't, or at least I didn't mean to, bash you for bringing that source to ATS for a pleasant discourse on the subject.

And that "correction" was purposely done in remembrance of this Youtube video...




posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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If that is a carving of Alexander the Great from his true tomb, he apparently wasn't as popular as we like to believe. I could carve a better face into a slab of rock than that, and I have never carved stone before. Seriously, it looks like a 10 year old with little artistic talent did a rough sketch of somebody with crayons and then somebody carved along the lines. Saying that that carving is a real Macedonian/Grecian/Alexander-ian carving is a huge insult to the artistic talents of the ancient Mediterraneans.

Thanks for posting, it's an interesting topic regardless of whether it is fake or not. We have to investigate all claims, even if they seem foolish. Better to have this topic, and Byrd's beautiful analysis, than to have no mention and end up with people thinking he really is buried in Illinois >.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by binomialtheorem
 





...hide yo kids, hide yo wife, and hide yo husband cause they denying ignorance out here!


You get a star for that, lmao!



posted on Jan, 8 2011 @ 05:36 PM
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Clicked on this thread with anticipation of reading about one of the greatest archeological finds in recent history.

Was i sadly mistaken...





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