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Moon has liquid core just like Earth... reveal sensors left on lunar surface by astronauts 40 YEARS

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posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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www.dailymail.co.uk...



It's an unlikely marriage between state-of-the-art and 40-year-old technology that has yielded extraordinary results.

Signals from seismic sensors left on the lunar surface by Apollo astronauts in 1971 have revealed that the Moon has a liquid core similar to Earth's.

Scientists at Nasa applied contemporary seismological techniques to the data being emitted from sensors placed by their colleagues during the U.S. space program's heyday.

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... #ixzz1AODmkHBt


So if they didn't go to the moon how did they leave censors behind?


The new research suggests the Moon possesses a solid, iron-rich inner core with a radius of nearly 150 miles and a fluid, primarily liquid-iron outer core with a radius of roughly 205 miles.

Where it differs from Earth is a partially molten boundary layer around the core estimated to have a radius of nearly 300 miles.

The data sheds light on the evolution of a lunar dynamo - a natural process by which our Moon may have generated and maintained its own strong magnetic field.



edit on 043131p://bFriday2011 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)


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edit on 1/7/2011 by Mirthful Me because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


They did go to the moon, they just shot the videos on earth because they didn't want us to see what they found on the dark side.

Nice find, though I find it difficult to believe the moon has a liquid core as it's density is far too low for it. Also, when the moon is struck by meteors and other space debris it actually rings like a hollow bell! I will locate my source for this as it has been a while, but in actuallity the moon is likely very porous and semi hollow. What we do know is that there is a very thick layer of solid alloy about 20 miles deep underneath the lunar dust surface. They have proven this by measuring the depth of impact craters. How is it that a meteor the size of a football field makes a crater no deeper than one the size of a car? I believe they referred to it as the moons 'bullet proof jacket.' I personally think both the moon and earth are quite hollow, based on the attraction of matter and the physical forces; when you spin loose matter it does not move to the center, it spreads outward to the point where the force of motion is matched by gravity.

The result of this? A hollow sphere.


But that's just my two cents. Good thread! S & F!!
edit on 7-1-2011 by Mikemp44 because: Sorry, spelling fail!



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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Reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


They put the sensors there using unmanned rockets?

You can do amazing things with the technology of the last 100 years.



 
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posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 09:56 PM
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thanks for the replies, I always find the view point of others interesting.


That's how we learn.



posted on Jan, 10 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by Lemon.Fresh
Reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


You can do amazing things with the technology of the last 100 years.



Yes,

Like landing men on the Moon and returning them safely to Earth.



posted on Jan, 11 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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Here is another link giving details on the moon's structure: geology.com...




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