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Sudden Oak Death disease sees trees felled across West

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posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:22 AM
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Sudden Oak Death disease sees trees felled across West


www.bbc.co.uk

Thousands of infected larch trees in Somerset are being felled in a bid to halt a deadly disease across the West.

About 2,000 hectares (200 million sq m) have been affected in the south west.

The airborne disease is highly contagious, and trees in Cornwall, Devon and south Wales have already been felled.

So far there is no known cure.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:22 AM
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Well here we go with yety another form of species dying off.

They say in the BBC report that this disease came from America, but they don't tell you what they said on the TV news that millions of trees in the US were affected.

They also don't tell you that this has been known about in the UK since early December 2010;

Ramorum disease has been found in Japanese Larch trees in Scotland for the first time ever, sparking a mass felling operation by Forestry Commission Scotland.

The disease, caused by the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, has been found in Japanese Larch trees in a Forestry Commission Scotland plantation on the Craignish Peninsula in Argyll.

In a bid to prevent the disease spreading, 1.25ha of trees are being felled in what Forestry Commission Scotland director Dr Bob McIntosh describes as a "real blow" to Scotland’s forestry.

www.hortweek.com...


Over here it has jumped species to larch trees - plants such as rhododendrons have also been infected - and no-one is sure where it will travel next.

So no known cure.. no way to stop it and it is spreading like wild fire and jumping from species to species..

Could it be at all possible that this is what is affecting the birds and the fish?

If this disease is air borne, then is it not possible for birds to catch it whilst in flight, die and fall into the sea and pollute the ocean with this disease?

One things is for sure, like the many failing businesses and state of the economy, this is not over yet...by a long shot.

Could this be a deliberate attack on the flora and fauna in order to bring about a human population decrease through lack of natural materials and food stocks?

Kinda trying to stay away from the old "something smells fishy" comment...but what the heck ...

www.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:32 AM
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You know this is getting really scary. I am not sure if it is related to the bird and fish die-offs but there seems to be a culmination of factors responsible for all of them. Birds, bees, fish, trees. Horse Chestnuts are dying, Dutch Elm and now Larch trees. It will be a very empty planet at this rate.
edit on 7/1/11 by Lebowski achiever because: changed tree name



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:40 AM
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Originally posted by Lebowski achiever
You know this is getting really scary. I am not sure if it is related to the bird and fish die-offs but there seems to be a culmination of factors responsible for all of them. Birds, bees, fish, trees. Horse Chestnuts are dying, Dutch Elm and now Larch trees. It will be a very empty planet at this rate.
edit on 7/1/11 by Lebowski achiever because: changed tree name


Its been happening since 1995.
And lol @ the rest of ATS fear mongering, the news decides to cover something other than local news and everyone gets a little scared about what happens in the real world.

At least people are starting to realize that the world isn't static and that you don't live in a bubble where everything is safe.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:40 AM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


Extralien

Very interesting and like you said, something New attacking our resources.... It is actually very worrying because when a bug / virus / disease becomes airborne then that's when any form of reasonable control starts to vanish and we become powerless to do anything....
One of the great fears in the world is an H1N1 type of thing becoming airborne - that will be when the 'fun' starts..!!!

Regarding the trees - they are the world's lungs and is this the start of a slow asyphixation of the world ?

Regards

PDUK



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 05:48 AM
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Here's a thread from 2005 of invasive species and the like.. nicely informative;
www.abovetopsecret.com...

And I cant help but wonder about the seed banks..

There are about 6 million accessions, or samples of a particular population, stored as seeds in about 1,300 genebanks throughout the world as of 2006. This amount represents a small fraction of the world's biodiversity, and many regions of the world have not been fully explored.

en.wikipedia.org...

It also makes me wonder exactly which countries are growing GM crops.. Are we going to see these countries come up trumps after a pandemic? Have these seed banks and GM crops been set up and organised many years prior to someone letting loose all hell ?

I can only wonder...



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:02 AM
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Is this one of those things like foot and mouth?

Because the UK is known for responding to mild and/or occasionally fatal diseases by killing everything.


Where a disease doesn't wipe out an entire population (and wiki suggests that this doesn't) it's usually best to let it decide which ones live, and then propogate those, spreading resistance, rather than our current approach of "Aargh! They might die! Better kill 'em!!!"



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:07 AM
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Could it be at all possible that this along with the birds, bees, fish, whales, crabs etc etc could all be due to the massive spill in the gulf?
Seems to me this is where everything really started changing......for the worse. Then there was the spill in Europe where the wall burst polluting the major river which seems to have dissappeared from the news?

Surely with everything thats going on globally the U.N. or similar bodies should be having emergency meetings to determine exactly whats going on here.
Im not scaremongering just stating the fact that the Earth seems to be dying. Thousands of fish and birds and now an illness in trees?
If there was a massive die off of trees globally due to a disease that cant be controlled how long before it spreads to other plants? also with everything that is going on would it be fair to say that another disease may be expected to surface that is detrimental to plantlife in our rivers, ponds and seas?



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:11 AM
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reply to post by jazz10
 


you do know that virtually every organism, ever, has diseases? We can either let the organism move past this disease by recognising that some have to die for a population to become immune, or try to prevent selective pressures from creating immunity and end up wiping out the entire population instead.

Evolution requires death. That's how it works. It's when we weaken resistance - either through pollution or our own misguided attempts to protect our investments - that we start to have a serious problem.
edit on 7/1/2011 by TheWill because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:18 AM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


I have to point out that contrary to the assumptions of posters and officials , no explanation has been verfified beyond doubt for the blackbird deaths, the crab deaths and pelican deaths, nor any of the mass deaths of vertibrate species in recent times. That makes those instances different to this one , where a confirmed case of disease has been identified, which has resulted in the felling of trees as part of a plan to reduce the spread of the disease.
It is however very sad, some of the trees they have cut down have been in place for many years, some have historical significance, and all were once beautiful examples of natures bounty to us. Also these trees have provided habitats for everything from birds to squirrels to bettles, and the ecosystem can ill afford such losses at this precarious time. I hope with all my heart that this disease does not spread any further, for our woodlands are one of the only things about Great Britain that remind us truely when we look upon them, who we are and where we come from. As a proud Brit, and being at least three quaters Celtic it always fills me with woe when woodland suffers under a darkness, because other than the woodlands and the mountains of Wales, Scotland, and the Pennines in England, we have so little left of the rugged wilds on which our forebares made thier living, and died thier deaths.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:29 AM
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Originally posted by TheWill
reply to post by jazz10
 


you do know that virtually every organism, ever, has diseases? We can either let the organism move past this disease by recognising that some have to die for a population to become immune, or try to prevent selective pressures from creating immunity and end up wiping out the entire population instead.

Evolution requires death. That's how it works. It's when we weaken resistance - either through pollution or our own misguided attempts to protect our investments - that we start to have a serious problem.
edit on 7/1/2011 by TheWill because: (no reason given)


Its unfortunate that post like these with any sense in them get ignored.
You aren't scary enough to listen to, ATS is all about Alex Jone, Jesse Ventura and Glenn Beck.
edit on 7-1-2011 by Segador because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:31 AM
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reply to post by Segador
 


Even if it has happened since 1995, what is that if you look at the Earth's age? Nothing! It is not even a microsecond if you put it in perspective. There is a great extinction event going on, most scientists will agree on that, whether you laugh at it or not.. The bee die off is far more serious than this but I, for one, have noticed all the horse chestnut trees dying off in my neighbourhood.. And also a lack of bees.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:38 AM
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Originally posted by Lebowski achiever
reply to post by Segador
 


Even if it has happened since 1995, what is that if you look at the Earth's age? Nothing! It is not even a microsecond if you put it in perspective. There is a great extinction event going on, most scientists will agree on that, whether you laugh at it or not.. The bee die off is far more serious than this but I, for one, have noticed all the horse chestnut trees dying off in my neighbourhood.. And also a lack of bees.


Its wintertime, of course there is going to be less bees.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:47 AM
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This might be relevant....


Is Wi-Fi making trees sick? Researchers doubt study

On that note, could we be killing entire flock of birds with WiFi hotspots??

Peace



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by Segador
 


I meant during the past few summers, dude. Don't tell me that you are denying the Bee die off as well. Sheesh.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by jazz10
 


This has been going on since way before the GOM incident. I attend regular duties in the woods and forests here in Cornwall and this has been a problem for a long time. I have noticed a lot of area's that use to be dense woodland gone, leaving nothing but fields of stumps. The first time I noticed anything major going on was on the A38 between Bodmin and Liskard, they cleared miles of tree's from the side of the road for no 'apparent' reason then slowly this was mentioned about the oak disease.

Its certainly changing the landscape, when we moved here 4 years ago it was green but no its looking more bare by the week.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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this makes no sense!

we have a bark beetle problem in MT you know what we do fell the trees with bark beetles and PROTECT the other trees against the bark beetle.

there must be a better way I doubt that many trees were infected.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 07:24 AM
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I think this is BS because the government planned to sell the forests off to company's to make way for holiday parks etc.
UK gov plan to sell off forests

And it just seems like a sneaky way to avoid confrontation from a petition with around 120,000 signatures, including mine. If you wish too sign then click HERE

And it's no big secret that the BBC is a lying tool of the Gov.
edit on 7/1/2011 by BarmyBilly because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/1/2011 by BarmyBilly because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 07:27 AM
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Originally posted by BarmyBilly
And it's no big secret that the BBC is a lying tool of the Gov.


I hear that brother, didn't know about the holiday parks bit though, but then again it comes as no surprise considering the booming trade they would get. Cornwall gets way too busy in the Summer. Why not stick some parks a little further out of the towns



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 07:48 AM
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This oak die off has been going on since at least 2007. It is certainly troublesome. That is one tree we cannot do without. We have already lost Chestnuts and the Ash tree numbers are tumbling as well. Insects and disease can decimate large stands of trees. I've seen the damage caused by gypsy moths first hand in Virginia.

This is from 2007 and relates to insects, disease, and climate conditions


Strange that it is happening in multiple parts of the world.



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