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Diabetes Defeated by a Microchip?

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posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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This sounds promising and hopefully is one of the more successful medical tech advances. This device has a blood glucose monitor and an insulin pump with a wearable computer to manage the bodies hormone levels 24/7.
With Diabetes growing to epic proportions, these advances are welcomed in a frustrating time for diabetics and families involved. It is amazing and perhaps a bit scary that we are beginning to literally incorporate technology into our bodies, but this one sounds promising and hopefully will provide some relief in managing the disease, if not ultimately defeating the ailment altogether.


Most people who treat their Type I Diabetes must still rely on pricking their finger and testing their blood several times everyday. Researchers at the Imperial College London want to give that job to a microchip. Pantelis Georgiou and Nick Oliver at ICL have developed a special blood glucose control chip that reacts to changes in sugar levels just like the cells in your body. The ‘Silicon Pancreas’ mimics the insulin controlling beta cells, as well as the glucagon controlling alpha cells, normally found in the healthy organ. In diabetics, beta cells are destroyed by the body’s immune system and alpha cells tend to suffer over the long term. When paired with a continuous glucose monitor embedded on the skin, and a pair of insulin and glucagon pumps, the Silicon Pancreas should be able to give diabetics an approximate response to blood sugar levels close to what their bodies would normally produce.


And even though implants like the JRDF device and the Silicon Pancreas have the potential to defeat diabetes by letting us control our blood sugar levels, neither is going to be a true cure. For that we will need to deal with the actual problem – the body’s loss of healthy beta cells. As we’ve discussed before, that’s probably going to come through stem cell therapies, some of which are already having great success. Cybernetic solutions for the disease are remarkable, and growing nearer to use, but they are likely only a stepping stone towards even better treatments. In the future, we won’t simply defeat diabetes, we’ll remove it from our bodies entirely. At least, I hope so.

Source


Peace,
spec




posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


So a chip controlling our hormones, na thanks.

What makes you think they cannot do this already using a mobile phone?
Isn't it possible mobiles can be used to control a persons hormones already?



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 


Ha, I can appreciate your thinking andy, it does sound scary but think of the people with Diabetes. I know many and it is tough on them and their families. It is crazy times but the marriage of body and tech will only continue to occur, imo, for better or worse, tis a sign o the times. Do I want one? No, but I will not speak for the afflicted.

Thanks for the reply,
spec



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 


Care to expand on how the cell phone controls your emotions rather than just suggesting it does?

Just curious.



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by andy1033
reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


So a chip controlling our hormones, na thanks.



Sir you obviously do not know anyone with this vile disease. I would rahter punch my worst enemy to a pulp every six months that inflict type one diabetes upon them. I simply do not hate anyone that much. I do not have the disease and people manage diabetes as best they can but ya know what gets to me?? It is the unspoken fear that in the future the worst case scenarios come home to roost, Loss of limbs, Sight etc. They have to live with that every day of their lives.

I hope you sir never get it!



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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Hopefully before diabetics go out and get a chip implanted in them they learn a bit about the importance of nutrition. Most diabetics haven't taken the time to learn that bitter melon will make them healthier naturally :/



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by tiger5
 


I probably already have it, and it was caused by gov and police trying to wreck my life.

So i am debating in this thread as a real thing, not some bystander. I understand some may get something like this chip, i understand that. Of course its nice if only used for positive, but gov and others always use techs for the bad side first.



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by KnowledgeIsPowre
 

Good advice except for children now being born with type 1 Diabetes. Nutrition doesn't seem to rid them of Diabetes(type 1) but surely it would help manage it. I have searched for cases of people beating type 1 with diet adjustments, but have not seen any triumphing success. I always believed in the power of the body/mind but when one is born with this, it seems really tough to deal with, much less defeat naturally. But I am all for the notion and if it can be done then it should be an example for all to follow and try(the nutritional approach), but so far they are at a loss.

spec



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by KnowledgeIsPowre
 


Well I know those who have tried these things including Kaerila ( Bitter melon) to know avail. SOme have found a slight increase in Glucose control. Do you know think that the educated Diabetics would have researched everything to rid themselves of this awful disease?

Do you not think that concerned upper class parents would not have tried everything to prevent their 8 year old from a life of checking blood glucose and problems of flying??

www.diabeteshealth.com...

I am hoping to get someone TO do an OP on how the drug companies screw diabetics every few years.
edit on 6-1-2011 by tiger5 because: Add a bit



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by tiger5
 



I am hoping to get someone TO do an OP on how the drug companies screw diabetics every few years.

Sounds like a great idea, why don't you seize the moment and take a stab at it?


spec



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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As a person that was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes on Oct 20, 2010 at the age of 35, I can tell you a little about this new treatment being investigated.

First, if they could find a way for a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to accurately measure glucose without the currently 20 min delay, I would be all for that. There are thousands of type 1's walking around right now with what looks like a big tick stuck to them that does the job, but like I said, it is on about a 20 min delay. The reason for that is the sensor is not directly accessing blood. While these sensors are great at helping get glucose numbers under control, they are uncomfortable to wear and depending on insurance, expensive.

I have currently have an insulin pump that receives the numbers from the sensor. There are studies being conducted on having a CGM & insulin pump "talk" to each other and adjust without any user intervention. I would be happy with that!

Also, those who would say that diet adjustments can cure a type 1, please, please actually talk to a type 1 before you make that claim. I am a member of a forum for diabetics and not one, out of the hundreds that have really tried, has managed to do that. One thing I will give you when it comes to diet, is it can help bring erratic numbers under control, but it will NOT cure them!

OiO



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by OneisOne
 


Hey one, thanks for the reply and insight. I have a good friend with an 11 year old daughter who was born with type 1 and it has been quite a struggle not only with the disease, but also getting her daughter to stick with the treatments and watch her diet. This tech seems to provide some relief at least.

spec



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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I am a type 1 diabetic, with the beta cells killed off by my immune system. I was 6 when this happened. I am now in my early thirties, and wear an insulin pump. I also spend 3 minutes, every few hours checking my glucose via finger-stick.

there currently are CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) systems out there, the problem with most of them is the duration of the CGM being enbedded in your subcutaneous has to be changed in 3 days or so.

These system are not evil, as some would have you believe, they do give us some medium of independence to some degree. but they are only a band-aid for a much bigger problem.

The CGM i have does not automatically adjust my insulin, it only gives ME information so I still have to do the work of changing and working with the numbers to correct things. Also means I have to pay a lot of my attention to the trending to adjust to stay within a optimal range. I still must account for my carbohydrate intake, and my exercise.

A cybernetic enhancement to do that sort of work would give me back alot of time to accomplish other things, verses worrying about my medical condition, and adjusting things.

This chip does seem like another good step in getting us back to being normal humans.

I'd advise against going off the deep end here saying that cybernetics, or biomods would be a bad thing for those that need them. Unless you suffer from a condition that rules all aspects of your life, and you do not have the freedom as others do, you do not have the aptitude to understand.

I definitely would be in the market for cybernetic eyes, and a cybernetic pancreas.

-Cyg



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


Spec, If at all possible your friend might want to investigate pump therapy for their daughter. It is amazing at the difference regarding quality of life. No injections and it is even possible to skip meals. Mine even calculates my insulin dose, I just tell it my blood sugar and how many carbs and I'm done. The downside it it is attached 24/7. To me that was a huge mental hurtle to overcome, but I'm glad I did. Now I just have this thing about the size of a pager with me all the time, easy peasy......

Also as far as the stem cell research goes, here is a great article about a study being done: Type 1 Diabetes Cure Closer Than Ever



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by Cygnis
 


Star for you Cygnis!

You are right, if the CGM could work with a pump without user intervention, that would be a step in the right direction! If I'm not mistaken, I think that is being worked on as an "artificial pancreas". As far as the CGM data stream goes, it's the only time to wish for a flat line!



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by OneisOne
 

Is that the cathadure(sp?) pump? Or is it something different? I think she has the state of the art pump, but surprise surprise her insurance is the one that has a final say in what they pay for and the mom has been going round and round with them to get the best care.

spec



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


Yes that sounds correct. I think the official pump term is a cannula, small tube inserted in to the body that delivers the insulin. As for the cost, yes they are very expensive. The one I have I think costs about $6,000. My insurance did not cover all the cost so I'm on a monthly payment plan. Like I said before, for quality of life, I think it's worth it. My sister is a cheer coach and one of her students is type 1. She is still on injections because a pump gets in the way for tumbling. I completely understand that. Pump therapy is a personal choice! One thing that isn't, getting insulin. No matter how a type 1 does it, it is one thing they can not go without.



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