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Questions about Prince Hall

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posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 07:28 AM
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I have a very limited understanding of Prince Hall masonry. I am fully aware that although my state recognizes Prince Hall as regular masonry (for almost two years now) none of the bodies that I am a part of seem to have any black men associated with it. Yet I see lots of cars in my area driving around with Shrine symbols on it and black men driving. Is there a separate Shrine club for Prince Hall? Is there a separate Scottish Rite? So far, the only interaction I have seen is at the grand lodge level when Prince Hall masons attend. I know they have their own grand lodge structure.

What are the feelings of Prince Hall masons as far as their interaction with regular lodges? Is it a non issue or is it still a touchy subject?




posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 07:41 AM
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all i know is that their are 70.000 members but i too see more prince hall masons with bumper stickers more then i see the other folk



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 07:54 AM
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According to some (I have absolutely no references, just hearsay) When George Washington went to a meeting, he found one of his "slaves" at the meeting. The "slave" was a black mason named Prince Hall. That's what I heard from a mason. Take it with a grain of salt!



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 08:01 AM
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reply to post by Hero Protagonist
 


Here is a brief history from Wiki. It doesn't go into much detail at all.



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


Thanks! It's more detail than I was given. Other than disinfo of course!



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


For what it's worth (because I reside close by - Apex584), we had a Prince Hall petitioner at dinner last month. Not sure why, other than his sponsor was a Blue Lodger. He was well received.

I was shocked when I moved here a few years ago and learned NC had just begun to recognize PH - just never really thought about it before. To the best of my knowledge, it is segregated all the way up.

Be well, Brother.



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 08:12 AM
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reply to post by capod2t
 


I have a neighbor who just joined Prince Hall. I asked him about trying to get some visitation going to bridge the obvious gap. He came back with a negative tone about it. Apparently, his brethren aren't too up on the idea. We have some old timers who are set in their ways and I don't see them changing anytime soon. I just hope I can learn a bit more about this subject. It seems somewhat taboo to mention in most cases.
Have a great day Brother.



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


It's still old school around here, Bro.

Be Well.
edit on 4-1-2011 by capod2t because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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see isn't the whole mason "read- geek, dork, unathletic, or fake military veterans" really pathetic..fake military as in NOT MARINES..all dorks, every mason..kinda like the D&D dweebs in high school.. couldn't play sports, couldn't fight their way out of a wet paper bag.. pathetic the whole dorkus organization..


even segregated masons?? boy, what a terrific way to "evolve" learn more, come together as a country..



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by rebeldog
 


Whats wrong with D&D?



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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We recognize Prince Hall here in California and I have sat in Lodge with several Brothers from a local Prince Hall Lodge in my home town. I have also had the pleasure of having a Past Grand Master of Prince Hall Masons in California visit my Lodge when I was sitting as master.

People, we are all Brothers. that's the whole point of the Fraternity.



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by W3RLIED2
 


nothing at all wrong with d&d unless it consumes you. as in waaaayyyyyyy fanatical about it. i was a kid in the late 70's and WOW..

some dudes completely toook it so far past overboard, it was like waaaaayyyyyyyyyy overboard, chopped up by the propeller, drifting thru the rip current as krill food..

but on the other hand, it wasn't exactly the chick gravy either.. hint. hint



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by sharkman
 


white lodges, black lodges... RREEEAAALLLLLLL brotherly...


kinda like sperm donor brothers by different fathers



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by rebeldog
 


A lot of us would like to see no separation. Sadly, the blockade seems to be on both sides. I think it will just take time. A lot of areas used "tradition" as a means to keep things as they have been for many years. Things are changing. Hopefully with some education on both sides, we can move forward.



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 11:50 PM
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tradition is the ANTITHESIS of progress.. absolute.. you see, that is the problem with all these "boys" clubs..


all these insecure, weak, too pansy to stand strong AS A MAN on their own 2 feet without a bunch of fellow cowards there to "support" each other..


the cowboys, miners, and trappers who tamed this land would call it queer-- or as useful as tits on a mule..


newsflash!!! what really made america great was the cowboy spirit. one man handling his business like a real man on his own.. without all those silly little things like secret handshakes, meetings, dinners, etc.. HOW PATHETIC!!! all weak little momma's boys.. lacking a pair in which to feel confident enough to face the world on their own.. weak in mind, body, and spirit...

the real pioneers of yesteryear thought about being real men, not about some lame stupid "ooohhh look at my cloak" "im a man now, see my dorky little ring with the symbol" "im part of something" "i belong"

what wussies!!!



posted on Jan, 5 2011 @ 07:28 AM
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reply to post by rebeldog
 


Thanks for letting us know how you feel. Got turned down huh. Maybe it's not for you. You should move out west and be a sheep herder. Go get em cowboy.



posted on Jan, 5 2011 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


Wow - that's one angry, hateful dude. Sad, really, so full of toxic venom and needing to spit it at others, of whom he knows very little. I will not reciprocate in kind. Rather, I will send positive vibes his way.

Bless his heart.

I won't be returning here either, as I have no further interest this colloquy.

p.s. Former Marine (0311 & Linebacker for FMFLant), College Athlete, Federal Officer, Homeland Security.



posted on Jan, 5 2011 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by capod2t
 


I guess if he feels better after venting, we have helped yet another through our lawful masonic workings.


Thanks for your service. (I was in the USAF or the Chair force as some like to call it)



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 02:09 AM
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Prince Hall was a free black man living in Boston (not a slave). He was initiated, passed and raised in an Irish Military Lodge. (I find this mildly ironic considering the history of race relations in Boston, but...). Once that military lodge left the area, Prince Hall petitioned several lodges for affiliation and was denied. He and a number of other freeborn African-Americans then wrote to the Grand Lodge of England (I think the Ancients lodge, but I'd have to check to be sure) and requested a charter for a new lodge. Said Charter was granted to African Lodge and the lodge was carried on the rolls of the Grand Lodge of England for some time.

At some point, communication between England and African Lodge broke down. Hey, there was this revolution thing that happened and, in any case, communication across oceans was trickier back then. African Lodge then, like many lodges in the period, began to issue charters to subsidiary lodges and, in essence, declared itself a Grand Lodge. Like "mainstream" Masonry, Prince Hall affiliated lodges eventually developed a modern understanding of Grand Lodge and tied the same to a particular jurisdiction.

One of the technical details that for a time hindered recognition of Prince Hall lodges was the fact that UGLE regarded African Lodge's charter as having been surrendered (for non-payment of dues? failure to communicate?) or something fairly similar. This barrier was eventually amicably resolved and no longer presents a hurdle to recognition or mutual visitation.

My jurisdiction recognizes the Prince Hall affiliated Grand Lodge and has representatives from the PHA Grand Lodge at all Grand Lodge Communications.

Not all the hesitancy around mutual recognition is on the "mainstream" side. Many Prince Hall Masons worry that recognition and visitation will deplete their numbers and result in the end of their tradition of Freemasonry. While, in so far as I am aware, this hasn't proven to be the case in any of the -- we're up to about 46, I believe -- jurisdictions where recognition has taken place, it remains a concern among many PHA Masons. This has lead to at least one circumstance in which the "mainstream" Grand Lodge unilaterally recognized the PHA Grand Lodge and then waited a time before the PHA Grand Lodge came around and made it mutual.

I hope that's helpful.



posted on Jan, 7 2011 @ 07:14 PM
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Prince Hall is recognized as the Father of Black Masonry in the United States. Historically, he made it possible for Negroes to be recognized and enjoy all privileges of free and accepted masonry.
Many rumors of the birth of Prince Hall have arisen. A few records and papers have been found of him in Barbados where it was rumored that he was born in 1748, but no record of birth by church or by state, has been found there, and none in Boston. All 11 countries were searched and churches with baptismal records were examined without finding the name of Prince Hall.
One widely circulated rumor states that "Prince Hall was free born in British West Indies. His father, Thomas Prince Hall, was an Englishman and his mother a free colored woman of French extraction. In 1765 he worked his passage on a ship to Boston, where he worked as a leather worker, a trade learned from his father. During this time he married Sarah Ritchery. Shortly after their marriage, she died at the age of 24. Eight years later he had acquired real estate and was qualified to vote. Prince Hall also pressed John Hancock to be allowed to join the Continental Army and was one of a few blacks who fought at the battle of Bunker Hill. Religiously inclined, he later became a minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church with a charge in Cambridge and fought for the abolition of slavery." Some accounts are paraphrased from the generally discredited Grimshaw book of 1903.
Free Masonry among Black men began during the War of Independence, when Prince Hall and fourteen other free black men were initiated into Lodge # 441, Irish Constitution, attached to the 38th Regiment of Foot, British Army Garrisoned at Castle Williams (now Fort Independence) Boston Harbor on March 6, 1775. The Master of the Lodge was Sergeant John Batt. Along with Prince Hall, the other newly made masons were Cyrus Johnson, Bueston Slinger, Prince Rees, John Canton, Peter Freeman, Benjamin Tiler, Duff Ruform, Thomas Santerson, Prince Rayden, Cato Spain, Boston Smith, Peter Best, Forten Howard and Richard Titley.



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