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When parents go hungry, the diabetes risk of future generations increases

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posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 07:33 PM
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When parents go hungry, the diabetes risk of future generations increases


www.privatemdlabs.com

Researchers said that the findings confirm the belief that when a parent or grandparent goes hungry, it can cause genetic changes that can lead to excess energy storage in the form of fat for future generations.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.google.com
news.discovery.com




posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 07:33 PM
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Well there ya go...

Not everyone who is fat is at fault... in fact we can indeed, in many cases blame it on their parents.

And then mixed with increased availability over the last 50 years of fast food makes this a witches brew....

Again...


poor nutrition during a paternal grandfather's adolescence increased his grandchild's risk of diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease.



Now think about when most Americans went amazingly hungry? The Great Depression....


www.privatemdlabs.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 2-1-2011 by HunkaHunka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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Which means that epidemics of obesity are tied to previous epidemics of hunger mixed with the introduction of abundant fat sources in subsequent generations.

Basically the genes prepare to store more fat in the next gen, but then the landscape changes from famine to feast, so the cupcake you eat today has more impact on your health than one would have had on your father or grandfather.
edit on 3-1-2011 by HunkaHunka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


I think it is great that evidence for DNA not being static is being discovered. The defeatist attitude that people are at the mercy of their genes is not helpful for making positive life changes.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyTHSeed
 


It's not defeatist to understand how you live your life effects your progeny...

How is that defeatist?

Isn't that empowering? To know that you can positively effect your children and grandchildrens health through your own diet?

Seems amazingly empowering to me as a Father.
edit on 2-1-2011 by HunkaHunka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


I meant that if one believes their DNA to be static - as is/was the traditional understanding - that would lead to a deafeatist attitude. If you believe your current health is mostly dictated by your unchangeable DNA, there is less reason to make changes in your diet.

But it seems DNA is NOT unchanging and is affected by our life choices. This information IS empowering, as you said.
edit on 2-1-2011 by JohnnyTHSeed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:32 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyTHSeed
 


However if you believe that changing your diet effects your unborn children and grandchildren, then it gives you lots of reasons to change your diet.

Also if you stop beating yourself up because your fat due to having poorly nourished grand parents then it actually does gve you more ability to change your diet because you no longer feel shame. Remember shame is a limiting emotion, not one that causes change.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


If I feel shame it is because I realize I have done something wrong. Shame feels very bad and I change my future behavior to avoid shame. Because of that, shame certainly does evoke change in me.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyTHSeed
 


Actually that is a myth... Using shame to get results often ends up solidifying the behavior because it is at the root of defeatist and self destructive behavior.

Once you remove shame, or the sense of right and wrong, then you can actually focus on healthy vs non healthy without the oppression of self judgement or victim mindsets.

Every therapist and interrogator knows this.

Perhaps we should bring this back to the topic.


edit on 2-1-2011 by HunkaHunka because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-1-2011 by HunkaHunka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


That is demoralized garbage you're spouting out. Being excessively self-critical is detrimental, but not feeling shame at all is very, very foolish and dangerous for society. Balance is needed.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 


Not at all... When you remove shame, you remove a lot of other elements as well... Like envy, hate etc... And you increase things like empathy, compassion etc

Regardless of how you feel about that, it doesn't change the fact that "When parents go hungry, the diabetes risk of future generations increases"

Which means that epidemics of obesity are tied to previous epidemics of hunger mixed with the introduction of abundant fat sources in subsequent generations.

Basically the genes prepare to store more fat in the next gen, but then the landscape changes from famine to feast, so the cupcake you eat today has more impact on your health than one would have had on your father or grandfather.
edit on 2-1-2011 by HunkaHunka because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-1-2011 by HunkaHunka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


Shame is very much tied in to empathy. Why would I feel ashamed for harming someone if I did not have empathy?

Your cupcake example is very good. That provides an easily understandable model of what has been discovered in the article.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyTHSeed
 


Shame causes you to devalue yourself... Empathy means you can feel others pain.... That's much different from shame...



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


This has to be a form of junk science.

Perhaps, it could be construed as a cop-out of sorts for larger people. I am large myself but the last thing I need is another cop-out.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:25 AM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


If I make a distasteful joke and hurt someone's feelings, I feel bad because I empathize with their feelings of hurt. What would you call that "bad" feeling I have from seeing that I hurt someone's feelings?

I call it shame and, in my example, it is directly caused by having empathy for others' feelings.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:39 AM
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Originally posted by HunkaHunka
reply to post by unityemissions
 


Not at all... When you remove shame, you remove a lot of other elements as well... Like envy, hate etc... And you increase things like empathy, compassion etc


Okay, you've bought into some seriously over simplified, twisted, paramorality. You fail to see the WISDOM of devaluing ones self in order to be humbled and expand one's awareness, reassess one's value structure, reinterpret a situation more accurately, etc, etc, etc. This requires the ability to reflect on the past, in the present, in order to establish a more productive future. Your concept of "self-limiting" doesn't put these into the equation, it seems. It's only self limiting from a childish or psychopathic "I want this now" type of perspective.

Sorry for that bit, and back on topic!

I find epigenetics, & nutrigenomics to be fascinating. Basically this changes the propensity for genetic expression in the next generation or two. I've read some of these changes skip a generation which I also find interesting. I do agree with you that many things are beyond our ability to control to an extent, and we are a product of our environment and genetics we inherited. I think it would be a little overly simple to say that obesity is or is not a result of one's lifestyle. In some cases, it could be the result of a parent or grandparents life experiences as a major factor, but in others it may be more a result of dietary choices. Even in the cases where it's simply "overeating", there could still be hormonal imbalances or similar where the desire is much greater than in most, and this could be mostly genetic in cause. It's all pretty intricate, but for sure one's life situation isn't entirely "one's fault" as many spout out these days. Once again, balance is needed!


edit on 3-1-2011 by unityemissions because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 03:34 AM
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When our bodies are exposed to dioxins our body puts that poison into fat to keep it from our internal organs.

South Korea scientists just did a story that losing fat will then put those dioxins into your internal organs...BAD.

Watching China's obesity/diabetic explosion is proof positive....Dioxins create diabetes/obesity. We've destroyed our DNA.

If China realizes what we did to them how mad do you think they will get?



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 03:47 AM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 


Shame can be good in some instances but I have repeatedly seen it cause self destructive behaviors and I saw it lead one person to suicide.

If someone is extremely conceited then a little shame can be good, but if someone suffers from poor self worth, which most over weight people do, then shame is only going to backfire. People with an already damaged sense of self worth are more apt to indulge in self destructive behavior.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by The Sword
reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


This has to be a form of junk science.

Perhaps, it could be construed as a cop-out of sorts for larger people. I am large myself but the last thing I need is another cop-out.



What makes you think it *has* to be some form of junk science?

Read the articles... there were more than one study which came to the same conclusion.

This is only a cop-out if you interpret it as such...



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by calstorm
reply to post by unityemissions
 


Shame can be good in some instances but I have repeatedly seen it cause self destructive behaviors and I saw it lead one person to suicide.

If someone is extremely conceited then a little shame can be good, but if someone suffers from poor self worth, which most over weight people do, then shame is only going to backfire. People with an already damaged sense of self worth are more apt to indulge in self destructive behavior.


You bring out a very interesting point here... shame/conceit. They are two sides of the same coin... remove one, and you remove the other.



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