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1000+ birds dropped dead from the sky.

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posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:41 PM
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Originally posted by christian28
www2.wnct.com...
Sorry to put up info from 2009, but the birds have been showing up dead and disoriented through out 2010 as well. Scientists believe some kind of toxin has coated their feathers causing the insulation on their wings to fail, but it's still under debate. This most likely has nothing to do with the current situation but it's not impossible that the deaths are totally unrelated. Pelicans are an indicator species. I wasn't trying to sound an alarm. Someone posted that a live bird was found in Ak dazed and going in circles. It made me think of the way the pelicans were acting.


Interesting that you mention the insulation on their wings. This is from the 70's. but talks about the military "exterminating" birds from a base using a solution to make them cold-sensitive:

news.google.com...


edit on 2-1-2011 by DukeOfDorch because: Added link to correct article using TinyUrl

edit on 2-1-2011 by DukeOfDorch because: Link still doesnt work. Trying again

edit on 2-1-2011 by DukeOfDorch because: Looks like ATS is blocking tinyurl with str_replace. Take 3.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:44 PM
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Originally posted by Gradius Maximus
I would like to bring to the attention of everyone here the issue of Rotenone.

This is a pesticide that has been used extensively as a insecticide and natural fish poison in Arkansas to wipe out certain species of invasive fish.

The levels of toxicity for birds are also extremely dangerous.

I can hypothesize that if this was sprayed on all local corn crops that it could have leeched into the river system and also have remained on the corn to be ingested by the blackbirds who become poisoned during their migration as they feed on the corn sprayed by the Rotenone.


Culling fish with Rotenone
Toxity in birds with Rotenone
Rotenone is created from Mullein



So how would the blackbird kill happen, all localized to 5000+ birds in a town 125 miles away from that river, and no other towns in between? When blackbirds would be asleep with the last light of day?

And how would it be species specific, both among fish and birds?

Drum fish, and blackbirds seeming the targets, as opposed to catfish and cardinals? By the way, drum fish in the Arkansas River are not an "invasive" species, neither are blackbirds in the air.

If it was a fish general poison, why not no massive catfish or cardinal kills?

And how would blackbirds be there in just the right place and time to eat fish carcasses that were poisoned, and yet still make the 125 mile journey to Beebe before dieing, when they should have been roosting after sundown?

I seldom say this. But you need to hone your intellect before you post again.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:52 PM
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Here are the tremors, in case anyone didn't check the USGS.

1.7 2011/01/01 00:49:52 35.278 -92.338 4.7 5 km ( 3 mi) S of Guy, AR

2.3 2010/12/31 23:44:39 35.290 -92.332 3.0 4 km ( 2 mi) S of Guy, AR

2.3 2010/12/31 02:48:13 35.308 -92.333 4.2 2 km ( 1 mi) S of Guy, AR

2.3 2010/12/31 00:55:14 35.298 -92.335 2.8 3 km ( 2 mi) S of Guy, AR

About 25-30 miles NW of Beebe. Note: the area has had over 500 tremors, which started in September.
edit on 2/1/11 by MikeboydUS because: More Cowbell



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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i think its swamp gas eheheheh

2nd line

3rd line



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by mydarkpassenger
 


Hey darkpassenger!

You might want to go back to school and get a little more educated. Blackbirds migrate at night. Sometimes for hundreds of miles,especially when the weather changes in the area their in. Large-eyed birds migrate at night also. You know...Ducks. Arkansas is a major flyway for these birds. Sorry I butted into YOUR conversation but I suggest before you start calling someone a troll you might want to know what your talking about first. How DO southerners talk or write? I'm not sure if that was an insult or a compliment. It does'nt matter but you better do some more reading.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by neowakko
 


First thought in my mind was a disturbance in Earth's electromagnetic field.

If I'm not mistaken, birds and other species are sensitive to such changes.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:09 AM
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..
edit on 3-1-2011 by gateway30 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:14 AM
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reply to post by pinchanze
 


Ecology

Q. What is the range of the American redwing?

A. The American redwing is found over most of North America. See its range map

Q. What is the redwing's habitat?

A. Redwings can be found in a wide range of habitats, but they usually nest in marshes and spend a lot of time feeding in fields. Sometimes they visit backyard bird feeders.

Q. What is the redwing's role in the ecosystem?

A. Redwings are omnivores. They eat a wide range of food in marshes during the breeding season. The rest of the year they mainly eat seeds on the ground. They eat a lot of grain.

Redwings are in turn eaten by foxes, bobcats, hawks, shrikes, and owls, and crows and blue jays often take their eggs and babies. Hundreds of thousands of redwings are poisoned every year in places where they destroy crops.

Q. What are a redwing's enemies?

A. Natural predators and humans are the redwing's worst enemies.

Q. What do redwings eat?

A. Redwings eat large quantities of seeds and insects.

Q. How do scientists learn where the redwings from one state or province migrate for the winter?

A. Scientists study bird banding data to learn where redwings go. They put thousands of numbered bands on redwing legs, but they know they will only recover data from a few of these birds in the future. So it takes a long time to amass enough data for them to draw accurate conclusions. Meanwhile, redwings can change some of their migration patterns, making the research even more complicated.

Q.How can we participate in Journey North's Red-winged Blackbird Migration Study?

A.You can

* Report the first redwing you SEE
* Report OTHER interesting redwing sightings and behaviors

Q. Which returns first: males or females?

A. Male redwings arrive on the breeding grounds a few days to a few weeks before the females return. Females look like large sparrows, so are often unnoticed.

Q. What do redwings eat when getting ready for their migration?

A. During late winter and late summer, redwings pig out on as much food as they can, mostly grain.

Q. Do redwings travel together when they migrate?

A. Yes, they form flocks for both feeding and flying during migration.

Q. What might be some advantages for redwings to migrate in groups?

A. While feeding, the more redwings there are, the more likely that at least one of them will notice a predator and warn the rest. During migratory flights, hawks have trouble singling out one redwing to strike when faced with their fast-moving, tight migratory flocks.

Q. Where do redwings spend the winter?

A. Some redwings winter all the way up in southern Canada and the northern states, but the majority of them winter in the central states, especially in agricultural areas.

Q. Do redwings migrate by day or night?

A. Redwings mostly migrate during daytime.

Q. When do redwings leave their wintering grounds?

A. Redwings typically start moving northward in mid-February, and reach the northern states by March.

Q. Many neotropical migrants have a fairly regular migration from year to year. Why don't redwings depart at almost the identical time each spring?

A. Neotropical migrants have no way of knowing what the weather may be like across the Gulf of Mexico when they leave their wintering grounds. Most of them migrate much later than redwings, and time their migration by daylength. Redwings are very dependent on open water on their marshland nesting territories. Since weather conditions vary enormously from one year to the next, so redwing migration varies, too.

Q. How do redwings prepare for the journey north?

A. Redwings double their fat reserves before migrationl, which helps fuel their flight. Adults molt, growing new body and flight feathers, in summer after they've finished breeding: these feathers will be fresh for fall migration, provide maximum warmth in winter, and still be in good enough condition for spring migration.

Q. When do the redwings arrive in their breeding marshes?

A. Male redwings arrive sometime between mid-February and mid-March.

Q. What do the redwings do first upon arrival back on their territories in the spring?

A. Males spend their mornings in the marsh, displaying and defending their territories. Until the weather is warm enough for food production in the marsh, they often leave in afternoon to feed in a field.

Q. What are some of the hazards that redwings face on their long migrations?

A. Being in so much unfamiliar territory, redwings are more vulnerable to predators during migration than when they are on a breeding territory. They only rarely hit communications towers, because they migrate by day. If they join a huge flock that causes damage on a farm, they may get poisoned or shot.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:14 AM
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reply to post by The Sword
 


Here is a map of magnetic anomalies over Arkansas.

It looks like major red pockets appear over Beebe, but I could be mistaken.
Magnetic Anomalies



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:14 AM
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Originally posted by The Sword
reply to post by neowakko
 


First thought in my mind was a disturbance in Earth's electromagnetic field.

If I'm not mistaken, birds and other species are sensitive to such changes.


Absolutely, but what is amazing about this is the deaths that occurred

Typically we just see migration, dis-orientation and maybe them acting abnormally in the cases of unusual EMF changes.

Just as marine sonar disrupts whales, and dolphins ability to use their innate tracking.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by gateway30
 

You left out the 20
but it was 11:30 pm just before new year .sorry



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by mydarkpassenger
 


Are you kidding me? Every brainstorming proposition imaginable in this thread and you state that I need to hone my intellect? Im glad you exercise your opinions but you need to leave your personal attacks in your head.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by CHEDwick
 


Yeah and CNN even gos on to claim they died of a mass heart attack
with no proof, i saw the reporters laughing about this incident, near at the end.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:20 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


I took a look at the map posted above and I honestly have no clue what part of Arkansas this occurred in.

You could have a point though. Strong EMP? Perhaps someone is playing with some "toys" in that area?


I wouldn't even bother saying HAARP. It's a cop-out answer.
edit on 3-1-2011 by The Sword because: Eliminated a redundant word



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:20 AM
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reply to post by dukeofjive
 



Someone posted the there is a Chem-Bio factory in Pine Bluff? Just for fun I looked at Google earth for the factory. Here some thing weird, probability water treatment plant? Throwing darts here.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by The Sword
 


Wasn't there a thread just recently about a crack or tilt in the earths magnetosphere, causing an unusual amount of radiation to enter?

I can't seem to find it at the moment. hmmmm



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by The Sword
 


I superimposed the magnetic map over google earth and the 200+ Intensity bubbles match up with Beebe's location



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:26 AM
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reply to post by Gradius Maximus
 


Thanks for that as well. I believe there's another thread on this subject that claims that there's a military base nearby. It also mentions a type of poison that was used to cull these birds.

There seems to be a few theories floating out there.



posted on Jan, 3 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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Originally posted by Gradius Maximus
reply to post by The Sword
 


I superimposed the magnetic map over google earth and the 200+ Intensity bubbles match up with Beebe's location


Now we are talking this is what I thought maybe the cause but I was not certain.

Can you post a pic to show the results.



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