Solar Activity Watch 2011

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posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


I have no idea, but it is weird, eh? I'm not like freaked about it, but after looking at my own spreadsheets, I have been going to that site for almost seven years. Either they finally needed to upgrade it in some way, or....?

Anyway, after looking just now again, they even took off more:

" Near Earth Asteroids

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

On January 19, 2011 there were 1183 potentially hazardous asteroids.


Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters: Asteroid Date(UT) Miss Distance Mag. Size


Notes: LD means "Lunar Distance." 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach. "


And that is all that is there...makes me go hmmmm.




posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 


Yes sir I am.

Odd, eh?



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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reply to post by lasertaglover
 


Check now,the list is back up.



posted on Jan, 20 2011 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by jpsdasnake
 


Nope,its not there anymore when i checked today... :T



posted on Jan, 20 2011 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by jpsdasnake
 


Yep, I saw that too. I know it is just small thing, and 'probably' just a fluke, but it is just weird.

Anyway, looks Sunspot 1147 is in the mood for some C-class action. I am still wondering if it is going to reve back up to what it was doing on the the other side of the sun when we caught those cool pics the other day.

Have a great day!



posted on Jan, 20 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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Spaceweather isn't listing them today, but the list still exists

NASA Near Earth Object Program

Hopefully they'll get their links and list worked out soon



posted on Jan, 21 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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Spaceweather has increased the percentage of an M flare from 1% to 10 % Haven't seen an increase in some time. I would think we are in for some C's at least.



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


M's. 1149 is looking stronger.

"Sunspot 1149 (the southern half of the complex) has a tangled magnetic field that harbors energy for strong flares. NOAA forecasters estimate a 10% chance of M-class eruptions during the next 24 hours. Readers with solar telescopes should continue to monitor the region for explosive developments."

spaceweather.com...



posted on Jan, 23 2011 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by lasertaglover
 


Thanks for the update - definitely something to keep an eye on. We will most likely get some strong C's.



posted on Jan, 26 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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A coronal hole in the sun's eastern hemisphere is spewing a stream of solar wind, due to hit Earth about a week from now. High-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras on Feb 1st or 2nd.

Spaceweather.com



posted on Jan, 27 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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Now then sun worshippers watchers. I have a question.

Recently there have been some good auroras shown on spaceweather and I always understood that to get these you needed activity yet every time I have looked the KP index has been 1 or at most 2. Always in the green anyway.

How is this?



posted on Jan, 27 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Maybe this



" The interplanetary magnetic field near Earth tipped south, opening a hole in Earth's magnetosphere; solar wind poured in to fuel the display. High-latitude sky watchers should remain alert as Bz continues to favor polar auroras on Jan. 25th.


www.spaceweather.com...



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 07:29 AM
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Lucky us, we missed a Double Shot! An M-1 flare and a CME both fired off, but not Earth directed.

From SpaceWeather.com:

"DOUBLE ERUPTION: Jan. 28th began with not one but two major eruptions on the sun. Separated by more than a million kilometers, the two blasts occurred almost simultaneously on opposite corners of the solar disk."

"These blasts are going to miss in concert, too. Plasma clouds ejected by the two eruptions will sail wide of our planet, one on the left and one on the right. No Earth-effects are expected; maybe next time."

spaceweather.com...



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 10:57 AM
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reply to post by lasertaglover
 


Wow...I was looking at SOHO and thought that there was a major CME directed at us because of the halo affect of it. Must have been because there were two events at once giving it the same appearance!

Very impressive display.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 

Will check out SOHO, thanks.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by lasertaglover
 


We got lucky on the M's! I find it strange that M flares are never facing earth, hope it remains so.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


I sooo agree! It is weird that any of the big stuff is missing us, but I am sure as heck glad it is.

It was really suprising how 1147 quieted down so much as soon as it turned towards us. I thought for sure that it would continue and blast an M-class at us this past week. Even though it did today, that doesn't count!



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by berkeleygal
 


So does that mean that we don't get a high KP index then. I need to get my head round this some more.

Any useful links on what the KP index actually is would be appreciated.



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


K index is showing at 2 (low). This is the first place I go

n3kl.org...

All the graphs are in one place



posted on Jan, 28 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


This might help somewhat:

Relationship between Kp and the Aurora

"...Cornell University scientists have determined geographic subpoints for the southern edges of auroral displays. The curves represent four values of the planetary index (Kp). As this index increases, the aurora's southern edge moves southward. "



www.spaceweather.com...





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