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Hackers crack open mobile network

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posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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Hackers crack open mobile network


www.bbc.co.uk

"Mobile calls and texts made on any GSM network can be eavesdropped upon using four cheap phones and open source software, say security researchers..."

"...Mr Nohl said that before now commercial equipment that could spy on calls cost upwards of £35,000. The kit demonstrated at the Berlin event cost far less than that, he said. For instance, the Motorola phones used to grab data cost only 10 euros (£9) each..."
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
edition.cnn.com
www.techeye.net

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"Internet a very large-scale spying machine" – info leaking site co-founder
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cell phones and being spyed on.




posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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This looks like a disturbing development in an age where our privacy is being chipped away in such an Orwellian fashion.

I know this technology has been in the hands of the police and gov't for years, but its the fact that this can now be done with a £9 cell phone by anyone who is inclined to do it is the scary part... the issues that come to mind is this could be a good tool for a fraudster to use, or for stalking, or, of course, the old journalist trick of hacking and listening in.

www.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 1-1-2011 by rufusthestuntbum because: re arranging



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 08:38 AM
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The reason this is even possible is because of lack of encryption. The governments around the world (remember the blackberry not allowed in Saudi Arabia) do not WANT companies to deeply encrypt mobile phone calls because the governments want to spy.

The fact that any joe blow with a little extra cash and a lot of extra time can do it is a testimony to that fact.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by againuntodust
 


i remember reading about how they cant crack the encryption on the phone with the right know how you can smuggle secret documents in the phone to the user



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 09:02 AM
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reply to post by SKinLaB
 

Well its all good
on the subject kevin mitnick used a simler hack when he was on the run from fbi he used a motrolla phone and keep one step ahead of them but the things we can with our phones are amazing for eg
jail break a iphone make a wifi scanning app that lets you connect to baby monitors and view on your phone? there is heaps of things you can do with phones i use to be into reverse engineering on phones



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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lol oki 900 anybody?



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 09:25 AM
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Originally posted by againuntodust
The reason this is even possible is because of lack of encryption.


That's not actually accurate, this particular hack utilises 4 Motorola phones flashed with custom firmware that have been modified to direct all network traffic to a PC, after targeting a specific phone and recording it's datastreams the messages and phone calls are decrypted using rainbow tables. It's still encrypted, but modern PCs and the ability to store the 2TB Rainbow tables that would have been fantasy when GSM was invented are now a reasonable proposition.
There is a lot more detail to how the entire hack is done, but it is obviously not something to be discussed.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 09:33 AM
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Originally posted by SKinLaB
Reply to post by xmetalgear
 


Better be careful. I just posted this same exact post the other day and some anal mod removed it

 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



If its already been posted, sorry, tried looking first.
2nd line



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by AgentSmith
 


I see. If the data were encrypted differently/better this would seemingly not be an issue. For instance, rainbow tables are rendered ineffective against hashes that includes salts (In cryptography, a salt consists of random bits that are used as one of the inputs to a key derivation function.)

Almost ten years ago, I think it was Rohde & Schwarz, they invented some special phone with a "crypto-chip" that had asymmetric 1024-bit and symmetric 128-bit encryption. The other party had to be using the same thing for it to be effective. It was mostly marketed towards government people with a price range in the thousands.

The company disclaimer? There are legal restrictions on using encrypted phones in some countries, so customers must check whether they can legally use it or not.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by againuntodust
 


i hope you know you can hookup you phone to your computer and change the encryption. do that with all of your friends phones and the government cant read a thing. but you will only be able to communicate with people with the same encryption.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 10:52 AM
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reply to post by zeon9010
 


Why do you hope he knows that?

I never understand why others hope that someone else knows something...




posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 11:13 AM
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I hope the S.O.B.s enjoy eavesdropping on my wife and her mother. Boy, if it were my job to sit in a cargo van on an all night stake out and listen to those two, I'd gargle buckshot within about 20 minutes.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 11:20 AM
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Yeah we have no privacy. You can also hack peoples' phone that have bluetooth tech



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Optix
 


Have we ever had privacy? Hackers have been doing this stuff for ages, you just need the ones that will release papers on it to find the stuff out.

How much of the worlds population do you think would be effected by a jammer and a pineapple, I'm thinking well over half.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 11:54 AM
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events.ccc.de...

GSM is still the most widely used security technology in the world with a user base of 5 billion and a quickly growing number of critical applications. 26C3's rainbow table attack on GSM's A5/1 encryption convinced many users that GSM calls should be considered unprotected. The network operators, however, have not woken up to the threat yet. Perhaps the new capabilities to be unleashed this year – like wide-band sniffing and real-time signal processing – will wake them up.

Now that GSM A5/1 encryption can be cracked in seconds, the complexity of wireless phone snooping moved to signal processing. Since GSM hops over a multitude of channels, a large chunk of radio spectrum needs to be analyzed, for example with USRPs, and decoded before storage or decoding. We demonstrate how this high bandwidth task can be achieved with cheap programmable phones.

Attached files

events.ccc.de...



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 01:44 PM
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Talking about privacy I still have my RadioShack Scanner on which I could pick up phone calls made on analogue cordless phones which were very popular up till recently when most folk moved over to digital. Although theres probably still a lot of the old ones being used.

I have overheard people giving out credit card details etc and I could have used it had I been so inclined.

It made me laugh when Bankers would claim there was no way for pin numbers and other details to be leaked when customers complained about unauthorised withdrawals...... cos I knew different.

Any criminal could drive around with their scanner and collect all sorts of stuff.



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Yhea this is a sweet trick no doubt, but the thing is it's almost too late - did you see the reference to the £3,500 system? Well as soon as that system hit the powers that be in the mobile world started working on what is basically GSM2... And considering how strong the first GSM was, and how long it took to effectively crack I'm pretty sure in the next couple of years we will see something much more secure.

edit: and guess what? it's going to be a perfect reason to sell everyone new phones! yay!
edit on 1/1/2011 by Now_Then because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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Reply to post by xmetalgear
 





 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



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