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Dying Inside: Elderly in prison

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posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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reply to post by space cadet
 


Yeah, but he was old when he was caught. I agree with you in this case. The deterrent needs to be there in order to stop people from doing such horrible things. But, if he were in prison for years upon years and got dementia and physical ailments of a severe degree, there is no reason to not move the person to a care home type setting. Heck, they still don't have freedom in this environment. It just means you don't have to have all the security measures and associated costs to stop them from escaping. Merely walk at a regular pace and you will outmaneuver them.




posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 10:13 AM
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There are a few people that perhaps need to be locked up but much fewer than the numbers currently behind bars. In most cases society has made them prisoners so it is society's responsibility to care for them,

With 50 states withing the United States and countless counties and towns there can be communities whose standards can accomodate lifestyle choices. Most people would prefer to live among "their own kind" and for those who may not, tough, it is a choice they made.

I would like to see thieves live among thieves, murderers live (or die) among other murderers, and so on. The choices we make should determine where and with whom we live. There may be some accepted standards for a "polite" society but the choice to live outside those standards is a choice to live outside that society.

For hopeless drug addicts I see no problem with providing them a cell from a closed-down prison where they may waste away with their drug of choice, perhaps even provided for them - if not for prohibition inflating the prices, drugs are cheap!

Perhaps the divisions need not be within our states but in the world for different lifestyle choices. I fail to see the need of thrusting diverse peoples together and demand they live in harmony together. I also fail to see why we insist on depriving people of the choices they make.

People who later may wish to rejoin the larger segments of a very strict and demanding society should be given opportunity, subject to review, to do so - though unless there are major payoffs to making such a choice I don't see why they would make that choice. Very few people really deserve to be locked up and among them are the psychopaths that should be offered the option of euthanasia. And these prisons would be more like mental asylums and hospitals.

We really have little need for many prisons. We have a great need for more tolerant and free societies that offer choices for different lifestyles and habits. Establishing such societal systems would be a cheaper and prefferable arrangement to what we have now.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Calender
 


I reallly don't think the answer is to go back to biblical repercussions. If a woman is found with another man, are you going to be the one to throw rocks to stone her to death?
They still do this very thing in extremist parts of the Middle East, is that the way you want to go?



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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Originally posted by gnosticquasar
I'm a believer in "you do the crime, you do the time". But, realistically, if you're 75 and can't even remember your own name, I seriously doubt that you're going to go round killing folks and holding up convenience stores. And seeing as it costs so much to house these inmates, maybe outsourcing them to some sort of secured nursing home would be the best thing to do.


Hi, picked your post at random but it does cover a key couple of points.....

At what point do you all think people stop being responsible for criminal acts? Anyone here thinking pensioners aren't capable of serious crime?

Outsourced secure nursing homes don't come free, assuming they already exist and have available capacity, they will hand out an invoice every month, where does this become a better deal and for whom?



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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I wonder if they are all microchiped, otherwise it does not make sense that the guy has escaped 10 times and has come back.

Thanks for the video.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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The only people I am willing to see grow old & die behind bars are killers and (big scale) hard drugs importers (as both people are killers, and it’s a compromise with the death penalty).

But I find it hard to believe that (most) elderly behind bars will be guilty of such crimes.
And although I think chopping the hands of thieves is very a Museum-Muslim to do, I think it is less wicked than seeing elderly people rot behind bares (even if when they were a strong young man they commited e.g. rape). Maybe give the elderly a choice? At least they won’t offend again.

Of course if an elderly person commits a crime (as an old person) then “crime deterrent” logic allows little choice but prison. However instead of mixing up old people with hard prisoners, it could be cheaper to give them their own “meals on wheels & chains” prison nursing homes?



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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The other day 2 black women got life sentences for stealing $11.

Then a white woman kill his husband and caused the suicide of another man got 25 years in prison.


This is where out problem is coming from.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by die_another_day
The other day 2 black women got life sentences for stealing $11.

Then a white woman kill his husband and caused the suicide of another man got 25 years in prison.


This is where out problem is coming from.


Where did you get that information from? Sounds like BS to me.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by Hoangkongfuey
 


www.reuters.com...

at least the governor came to his senses.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


The best solution for the problem I think is to let them go home to be taken care of by their family. This solves two problems. One is the unnecessary spending of the federal and/or the state budget. The other is the natural isolation from the public due to their immobility. However, before this to be decided, the committe must agree to the condition of the prisoner that he/she is bedridden and can not move around by her/him self. What the nature can take care of by itself should not be duplicated by the prison system.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:10 PM
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Solutions? I have 1...

30-06 round to the back of the head.

I'd start with psychopaths, sociopaths, pedophiles and rapists...

Magnum



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:12 PM
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I keep seeing the same comment over and over...."the best solution this, the best solution that"

Realize there isn't a solution to this problem...The prison system is a business so its going to stay the way it is. The more ppl that get locked up for years the more the share holders make. Its not something that can be fixed because the people that run them are powerful wealthy people. Theres no way they're going to let anything happen to disrupt their profit. Theres been many attempts to reform the prison systems, but they throw some money at the situation, then get one or two of their lobiests to talk to the media to assure us that the reforms have taken place when they haven't, and everything is fixed...right back to business.

Its not something that can be fixed...Its like trying to "fix" walmart. Nothing can be done! Walmart comes into a city and all the small businesses go under. Its not something thats preventable or fixable.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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All I want to know is; How the HELL does it cost $100,000.00 to care for each individual prisoner when we have elderly people on the outside making only a fraction of that in social security payments??? Most people on the outside don't make $100,000.00 a year, they make half that! They have to feed a whole family on that salary and they somehow get through it, yet here we are paying $100,000.00 per prisoner????? That's absolutely ridiculous. There's something VERY wrong and corrupt afoot.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by Adonsa
May I raise some questions about elderly prisoners and the obamacare death panels?

The question becomes, "are prisoners exempted from the death panel requirements of the obamacare law?"

to be quite honest,
I don't think it matters very much
cuz in a few more weeks I expect
Obamacare to be repealed.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by notsoperfect
The best solution for the problem I think is to let them go home to be taken care of by their family.

that may be good for some,
but others do not have family
or a family that wants them
or to take care of them.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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The problem of old aged prisoners is not just confined to the US, we are starting to have the same problem here in the UK. With modern day forensics, some of the 'older crimes' are now being detected, so some criminals are coming into the Criminal Justice System quite some time after their original crimes were committed.

In the UK, ALL prisoners regardless of nationality are entitled to full NHS care. Most prisons healthcare is run by local NHS Trusts, with the full range of care that anyone who is 'outside' of a prison has access to.

UK prisoners with mental health problems do go to places like Broadmoor and Rampton as well as other secure mental health facilities. Likewise, some prisoners with dementia go to special secure medical facilities. 'End-of-Life' care within prison is still at its infant stage within some prisons as each death is considered a death in custody and Doctors and Govenors are loath to issue a DNR order.

At some point in the future, TPTB will have to come to terms with 'age old prisoners' and will have to build specially designed prisons on the designs of Residential/Nursing Homes but within prison walls run by Nurses and Prison Officers alike.

FYI, I am a Registered Nurse working on an Inpatient Unit within a UK Prison.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by orwellianunenlightenment
reply to post by space cadet
 


Yeah, but he was old when he was caught. I agree with you in this case. The deterrent needs to be there in order to stop people from doing such horrible things. But, if he were in prison for years upon years and got dementia and physical ailments of a severe degree, there is no reason to not move the person to a care home type setting. Heck, they still don't have freedom in this environment. It just means you don't have to have all the security measures and associated costs to stop them from escaping. Merely walk at a regular pace and you will outmaneuver them.


Would you really want your grandma or grandpa in an old home, living a door away from this guy even if he's old? I've heard of murders in old homes, it happens. Even old people can cause great harm to each other. What if this guy happens to have a flashback one day and in his dementia kills one of the old folks living close to him? We'd have to build old homes specially for violent old criminals.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:34 PM
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Originally posted by Akragon
Its like trying to "fix" walmart. Nothing can be done! Walmart comes into a city and all the small businesses go under. Its not something thats preventable or fixable.

well yes, there is something
that can be done with wally world.
but it's illegal.

but hell, they're not playing by the
rules anyway



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by Magnum007
Solutions? I have 1...

30-06 round to the back of the head.

I'd start with psychopaths, sociopaths, pedophiles and rapists...

Magnum


I don't believe in any violence, and never ever against citizens. The true criminals and psychos are the leaders and the international bankers, primarily Rothchild connections, and the Bloodlines/Cartel. The rest are their victims for the most part.

The solution is a completely equal world without banks and money and with most of the crimes decriminalized and then real efforts made to protect and heal when necessary, ie. serious situations only.



posted on Jan, 2 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by die_another_day
reply to post by Hoangkongfuey
 


www.reuters.com...

at least the governor came to his senses.


Thanks for providing the source. I've read the article and some comments, it's ridiculous.

Magnum


Solutions? I have 1... 30-06 round to the back of the head. I'd start with psychopaths, sociopaths, pedophiles and rapists... Magnum


I was talking with a friend of mines about that a couple days ago and we pretty much came up with the same solution. Some might say it's inhumane but keeping them in prison for life, I believe, is also inhumane. Besides, if they can commit those crimes, they deserve it.


Originally posted by Akragon
The prison system is a business so its going to stay the way it is. The more ppl that get locked up for years the more the share holders make. Its not something that can be fixed because the people that run them are powerful wealthy people.


Sadly, I agree with Akragon. I seen a documentary about this some time ago, I don't remember what it was called though.



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