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Homeless Man Drives Across Country Helping Other Homeless

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posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 12:32 AM
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Originally posted by Stop-loss!
reply to post by Sestias
 


I have never been homeless before, but I know how it feels to sleep on a bare cold floor. To sleep out in the open while the hot baking sun roasts your skin. I wish this man a better future and to those who are struggling for everyday life. If the rich and poor traded belongings just for one day, would the rich still be greedy or give a helping hand to the less fortunate?
edit on 29-12-2010 by Stop-loss! because: (no reason given)


Its actually pretty nice to be quite honest.
You were probably sleeping the wrong way, its not like a bed where you sleep facing up.




posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by Sestias
 



It doesn't take much to fall into his fate. Many, many people are just one paycheck away from where he is now.


I disagree. It takes a lifetime of bad decision making to fall into this fate! (Exception of the mentally ill, and I agree with you that a large number of homeless are mentally ill.)

To fall into this fate, you have to be unemployed, unskilled, unhealthy, and with no family or friends. If you have skills and good health, you can find a way to survive. If you have family or friends, they will lend you a hand, give you a place to stay, hook you up with a job, etc., etc.

In order to become entirely destitute, you have to have alienated every single good person in your life, lost your job, lost all repor with your landlords and creditors, and eventually find yourself with absolutely nothing, no one to turn to, nowhere to go, and no physical skills to turn back on! How is that possible for a sane and healthy person?

I guarantee 100% that it cannot happen to a good upstanding person. I've already accused of being judgemental, and on a "high horse," but I have to use myself and my circle of friends and families as an example. I am not even distantly acquainted with anyone that this could happen to. Anybody that I have ever met more than once would be welcome at my home, and I have at least a dozen friends that coud put them to work today as a favor to me! If I lost my job and home, at least 10 other households would offer to take in my family of 4, and that doesn't count my Masonic brothers. If there was not a single job in the State, I could mow lawns, wash cars, wash windows, pick berries and sell them on the roadside, do odd jobs, work on cars, volunteer somewhere until the recognized my skills and employed me. There are an infinite number of possibilities and ways to survive.

"Homelessness" is certainly a "choice." Actually it is a long series of choices, and if you ever find yourself in that condition, it means you are not a good person, and you have a lifelong history of alienating all the good things around you. (Again, apologies to the mentally ill, for them it may not be a choice.)



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 10:08 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Sestias
 



It doesn't take much to fall into his fate. Many, many people are just one paycheck away from where he is now.


I disagree.

I guarantee 100% that it cannot happen to a good upstanding person. I've already accused of being judgemental, and on a "high horse," but I have to use myself and my circle of friends and families as an example. I am not even distantly acquainted with anyone that this could happen to. Anybody that I have ever met more than once would be welcome at my home, and I have at least a dozen friends that coud put them to work today as a favor to me! If I lost my job and home, at least 10 other households would offer to take in my family of 4, and that doesn't count my Masonic brothers. If there was not a single job in the State, I could mow lawns, wash cars, wash windows, pick berries and sell them on the roadside, do odd jobs, work on cars, volunteer somewhere until the recognized my skills and employed me. There are an infinite number of possibilities and ways to survive.


You've pretty much validated one of my major points. For every so-called "self-made man (or woman)" there are many people who have given them a hand-up along the way and they have had many fortunate circumstances in their lives.

I am one of those who would have been homeless at times but was fortunate enough to have relatives who took me in for very little rent. I also had the good fortune of growing up in a middle-class home where I was given many advantages -- good teeth, good health care, good education, etc. etc. When I fell into poverty I had all these advantages, which made me presentable to employers and insured that my downfall would not be a long one. I do not pat myself on the back for these gifts, or believe I am superior to those who have not been so fortunate in life.

I just remember "There, but for the grace of God, go I."



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


You claim that it takes a lifetime of bad decisions to fall into this fate.

My mother had a decent job, (after McDonald's). It wasn't great, but it paid all of her bills and allowed her to be self-sufficient for her and my younger brother. However, she also needed a hip replacement. For two years, she continued to work, full-time, (and at times 2 jobs, 80/hour weeks), through the use of a cane and pain medications. She could not afford to take the 3 months off of work for the recovery period of a total hip replacement.

Then the economy tanked. Her part-time employer folded, leaving her with only one job. Then they downsized, and turned every employee into part-time employees. Her income fell by 70%. Mind you, she had done nothing wrong - this situation was out of her control.

At this point, she was only making roughly $300/month, and she still desperately needed a total hip replacement. She was forced with the prospect of moving her and her son into their car. At this point, my partner and I moved her and my brother 2 hours north and in with us. We helped her get her surgery, recover, and now she is able to work again.

That being said - there was no one else in her family who was able to help her. Most of my family on her side are either thousands of miles away, or dirt poor themselves. Her friends were already helping out others, and had no room to take in 2 more people. The unemployment rate in her town was nearly 20% - finding additional work wasn't easy.

So I ask, what bad decisions did she make? How can you manipulate this into being her fault?



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by journey2010
 


None! She worked hard, she raised a good son, she served as a great example, and when she needed help, you were there for her. She is not homeless.

I recently had a position open that paid $32K per year. I scanned over 100 applications and I offered 60 opportunities to give me a work sample. 20 replied. (33%) Of those 20, I offered interviews to 10. 4 declined right away, 6 agreed. Of those 6, 3 showed up for the interview. (30% again) This was not a minimum wage job!

Now why does Florida have 10% unemployment again?
edit on 30-12-2010 by getreadyalready because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


When I took her into my home, I was living on unemployment. (After having lost my job due to my back injuries.)

Had there not been unemployment, we would have all been out on the streets.

All that I ask of you and others is this: Don't judge so easily. YES, there are a lot of people that abuse the system. But that doesn't mean that everyone does.

My grandmother lives on disability. She cannot drive, can barely see, and has a difficult time walking. She has been on disability her entire life. She lives on a Social Security check of $610/month and gets $11, yes - eleven dollars - of food stamps each month. She does not qualify for any other assistance. Now, what has she done wrong? Not everyone can work.

Why must you have such a stick up your arse in regard to everyone that is suffering due to no job? Simply recognize that there are people that take advantage of unemployment, but NOT EVERYONE. Just like there are people that have good jobs, but skimp on by - thus taking advantage of their employers for a paycheck.

Not everyone is you. Not everyone will come across an employer like you. And yes, sometimes bad things happen to good people. It's not always their fault.



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 08:07 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
"Homelessness" is certainly a "choice." Actually it is a long series of choices, and if you ever find yourself in that condition, it means you are not a good person, and you have a lifelong history of alienating all the good things around you. (Again, apologies to the mentally ill, for them it may not be a choice.)


My friend,

Who are you to decide who is "good"?

I was not aware that anyone was appointed to sit in the creators seat as judge of his creation. Every single person who is homeless arrived there by a road YOU have NOT travelled. If you had travelled that road you would be where they are. Regardless, since you haven't, you are in no position to judge the view of their journey.

The fact of the matter is that we are all children of the same creator. We are his work in action. What you see as a hopeless homeless person is not something "bad". It is the greatest gift God has given you. A fellow human being who could use a hand. Yet, you judge his work? Shame on you.

It is wonderful that you help those who meet your high standards. It is great that you are in a position to employ a handful of the unemployed. This does not put you in a position to judge anyone.

Of those who have chosen to be homeless, do you know why they chose that road? Because they are tired of living in a society that judges people for their external qualities. They are content to live on the streets among those who value the internal qualities of a person. The homeless are a tight band. They care for one another. They are content with the things God gives them. They share and they love.

I should not have to explain this to a Mason. Go spend time with the homeless, get to know them, learn to love them. You WILL learn something of being human.

With Love,

Your Brother



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 08:50 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 





I guarantee 100% that it cannot happen to a good upstanding person.


You sir can kiss my @ss. I may be a far cry from where I used to be, but I have been homeless and I promise you had you been in my same situation, I highly doubt you would have survived, let alone come of it half as sane as I did. I promise you it was not due to any poor choices I made, or from being less than an upstanding citizen. Despite the fact that my life would have been easier if I had done things like cheat the system or stole food when I was hungry, but I refused. I knew the kind of person I wanted to be and the kind of life I wanted. Thankfully my best/worst trait is that I am stubborn as heck. According to you I must chosen to be born to a drug addicted mother, and I must have also chosen for her to sell my social security number for a bag of dope. Apparently I also choose that there be laws that you can't prosecute a dead person for identity theft. Do you know how hard it is to find a job when you have barely turned 18 when you have no social security card (don't even know the number) or have a birth certificate and can't obtain one because you don't know what county you where born in, because your mother, your only known relative committed suicide.
But you are right, I could have chosen being raped every night over being homeless. You drag yourself out of that, and then you can be on your high horse. The thing is though, that I know for all my hard work, a bit of bad luck through no fault of my own could set me back even enough to put me on the streets again. Trust me, I know, I have come close a few times since then, funding cuts, that have eliminated my job, having a landlord who had a bit of bad luck himself. a spouse that decided to walk off and leave.

I have a feeling that if you spent one month in the shoes I used to be in, you would be singing a different tune.



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 10:00 PM
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reply to post by calstorm
 


There are always exceptions, and perhaps I have over-generalized. Of course it isn' the fault of a child or an orphan, but by and large it is a choice.

I have spent plenty of time with the homeless. I have attempted to house, give jobs, train, and help them. It was a fruitless endeavor, because most of them refused to work, or stole from me, or just disappeared a few hours into their work day.

I would love to help anyone willing to help themself. Unfortunately, the vast majority of homeless do not wish to be helped.

Believe me, I know my opinion is not popular, but I believe every living soul should be contributing something to the world. For a disabled old grandmother, maybe it is love or patience, or experience, for a young man maybe it is work, for a disabled person maybe it is conversation, knowledge, or research, but I do not see any point in supporting those people who do not wish to contribute something back.



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 10:36 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
I have spent plenty of time with the homeless. I have attempted to house, give jobs, train, and help them. It was a fruitless endeavor, because most of them refused to work, or stole from me, or just disappeared a few hours into their work day.


My friend,

If this was a fruitless endeavor, then you were doing it for the wrong reasons. You either enjoy helping and get satisfaction out of helping those who cannot help themselves, or you do not. Do not presume you know what another is capable of. Even if by all external appearances they appear healthy, obviously they are not in their mind. This does not make them bad. This is a product of the life they lead. You do not know what they have had happen to them to lead them to this point.


Originally posted by getreadyalready
I would love to help anyone willing to help themself. Unfortunately, the vast majority of homeless do not wish to be helped.


Perhaps what you consider help is not what they need? Perhaps a little non-judgemental love would suffice and then just leave them be.


Originally posted by getreadyalready
Believe me, I know my opinion is not popular, but I believe every living soul should be contributing something to the world.


Who are you to demand of another what they do with their own body? You seem to only have a problem with those who do not want your help. If they do not ask anything of you, do not want your help, what business is it of your if they are homeless? Are you in favor of rounding the homeless up and placing them in labor camps?

It takes all kinds to make the world go round. I suppose you are just playing your part.

Judge not, Love all, be at peace

With Love,

Your Brother

edit on 30-12-2010 by IAMIAM because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 

I don't mean to be cynical, but you are painting yourself as this upstanding, righteous citizen who has not only attempted to hire the unemployed on many occasions but has also made many attempts to help them with their immediate needs. In return you found irresponsibility, ingratitude, poor character, laziness, lack of gumption, deserved suffering and altogether worthlessness (in your judgment).

Many people who trash those on state assistance, unemployment, or other social programs, or those who live in their cars or shelters, or are on the streets, haven't really tried to help them in any serious way. They just claim they have in order to justify their hatred of those less fortunate than themselves. Most times they haven't really tried to help at all, but have just heard stories about people who know people who have tried and failed to give assistance to the clearly worthless in our society.

I have to hand it to you though. You do have the gumption to challenge just about everybody else on this thread and stick to your guns, even when your viewpoint is unpopular. That takes a certain amount of courage.

That said, I am reminded of the working-class Cockney guy in "My Fair Lady" who says there are two types of poor people: the deserving and the undeserving. There is likely some truth in this. Still, I am with those who believe it is not our place to judge others, especially when we haven't walked in their shoes. We should not expect to be rewarded for our good deeds or covet the praise of one's peers.

One should give for the pure joy of giving. Wanting extravagant praise or wanting people to do or say only what you would like them to in return for your efforts is not unselfish giving. It is egotistical and possibly the result of low self-esteem that is boosted by feeling superior to others.

edit on 30-12-2010 by Sestias because: Proofreading



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 12:58 AM
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If he's driving,you cant consider him homeless. The deffinition of homeless according to webster "No source of income other than hand outs,sometimes gets lost and cannot find the soup kitchen."



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by IAMIAM
 


The "fruitlessness" came because there was little to no success in the efforts. I didn't do it for some selfless reason, or for any self-satisfaction, I was somewhat forced into the situation.

I'll back up a little bit and give the whole story. My wife and I took over a small "teen club" that had mini golf, a dance hall, and a gokart track. It was positioned along a railroad track. I was about 21, and I had no preconceived notions about the homeless that lived along the tracks. We let them come up and use our water spigots, take our left over lumber, take our left over carpet remnants, etc. We knew several of them as regulars. One day I let my dog out to pee, and she didn't come back. She was well-trained and I knew something was wrong. We didn't find her on the first look, but one of the homeless guys was sharpening a small hatchet and seemed very uncomfortable about us looking for the dog. We called in the other workers from the club and upon a second look, the dog was discovered decapitated on the train tracks. No train had come through. It quickly became apparent that the dog was planned has his breakfast. Much violence ensued, including a large fire that consumed most of the homeless camp. The police and fire department were very considerate of the circumstances, we didn't get in any trouble, and the one homeless guy was arrested for animal cruelty, but released the following day. During the fiasco, many stolen purses were found, child porn was found, children's undergarments were found. Criminal records of murder, child sexual assault, and other things were discovered.

The real problem was that young teens walked those tracks to get to our club. It was obviously a very dangerous situation! So, each afternoon, we began walking the tracks and removing all the "threats." I did feel bad about the way we were treating them, so I partnered with a couple of construction and farming companies, and we offered them alternatives. They could have small work cabins, free use of tools, and job training if they wished to relocate and work, or they could stick around and be harassed by us everyday. Many of them just resisted for a few days, and eventually wandered off, a few of them were grateful and seemed very interested in work, but after a couple of hours, they would also wander off.

Out of about 25 healthy looking men, 1 actually continued to work, and raised himself out of his situation. All the others didn't even put forth an effort.

NOW,
On another note, God gives us all certain skills and aptitudes. Mine is certainly not providing love and patience to people. Mine is motivating and expecting a lot of effort and results. I can help a great many people, but if what they need is love and understanding, then I am not the man for that job, and I suppose the homeless shelters are the best place for those people.



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by Sestias
 


To add to my earlier story,

Since that experience, I have never refused a person food, and I never will. If I am approached for a handout, I offer food, shelter, and work. EVERYTIME, without fail! Out of hundreds and hundreds of panhandlers that have approached me, I think 3 actually took me up on the offer to buy them a meal, and none have ever taken me up on the offer of shelter and work. Most of the time, they only want cash. Sorry, but I don't believe they are really that down and out. If they were really just having hard times, they would be thrilled at a hot meal and an opportunity to turn their life around!



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I'm with you on the subject of hand-outs. I don't discriminate about who I give them to, but I only give them at all if I have a little extra cash.

I used to live in New York. Every payday I would break a $20 bill into singles and give one to the first 20 people who asked me. There were so many people who would ask you that I had to limit how much I spent. I knew that some of them would use the money for dope or booze. I also knew that in New York many people actually make a living out of panhandling -- they're professionals. You can't always tell the difference.

I do give when I can. Once I bought hamburgers at MacDonald's for a couple who were living in their car . They seemed very grateful. It's important to give but you have to remember to take care of yourself as well.



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 01:35 PM
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Currently I am enjoying good fortune. There seems to be a lot of what I call "bums" on the streets; I don't know their circumstances and it's not my place to judge.
I do suspect that most of the money I give goes for alcohol and drugs, but I don't know that for sure and as one that has struggled with my own demons.... "there but for the grace of God go I"

I give freely and get the constant "chump" label from my girl friend all the time; I don't care because when I needed help; someone was there for me. I feel it's the only honorable and gracious path to respond in kind. I only wish I could do more to help my fellow man that's down on his luck.



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 01:41 PM
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A sincere thank you to this gentleman! Peace be with you and others that are homeless!



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I have heard the term over qualfied many times since I recieved a degree. I worked as a supervisor years a go and I know from experience that people who have too much education or skills is considered overqualfied for. This was even before an interveiw and by the manager just looking at the application.
I know applications are pretty standard so a person can't come off as arrogant really. In fact most of the time when I heard I was overqualfied it was simply from my resume or application alone I never even got an interveiw.
I really applaude this guy for helping others even when he had little himself.



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by whaaa
 


It is nice to be charitable, but just as an experiment, instead of handing them a dollar or two, offer to by them a meal, most will not accept, to be really surprised, offer them a $20 or $100 if they will help you wax your car or clean your garage pick up trash around your business. That is the quickest and easiest way to get rid of a panhandler. I began using it at all of my businesses. They were welcome to stay, as long as they checked in with me at 8 a.m. and grabbed a pair of pinchers and a trashcan. I would pay cash for every full trashbag that came back. If they refused, then they got a trespass violation. Work or leave. I never had to actually use the trespass violation, because just the mention of work sent them scurrying!



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