Sun's Path in 2010: in a single frame (Time lapsed- very interesting)

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posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 10:08 AM
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Can a single picture sum up all of 2010? In a way, yes. The above multiple-exposure photo shows the figure-eight path of the sun over the course of the entire year, known as an analemma.

Analemma photographs are made by taking a picture of the sun from the same place at the same time of day once or twice a week, generating 30 to 50 frames. This picture, made in Veszprem, Hungary, combines 36 photos of the sun taken at 10 a.m. local time between January and December. A separate picture of the neighborhood taken from the same location but at a different time of day was digitally composited into the foreground.

The sun makes this shape over a year because Earth rotates on a slightly different axis than the sun, and our planet also travels on an elliptical orbit. As one hemisphere of Earth tilts farther from the sun, the arc of the sun's daily path seen from that location lowers toward the horizon. The sun's arc then gets higher in the sky as the tilt reverses. The sun's highest point in the sky, seen in this analemma, occurs during the summer solstice, while its lowest point is during winter solstice.
Because of the time and precision involved, photographs of analemmas can be very difficult to produce. So far, only about 20 people worldwide have released successful analemma photos

Source: news.nationalgeographic.com...:01

I thought this was extremely interesting. I didn't know the Sun traveled like that. You can see more pics by Googling etc. I found this site: www.perseus.gr... wish I had the time and mind to do this. I would forget to take the picture half the time.

Anyone on ATSer ever try this? Can you post your results? Thanks in advance.

I am betting there is at least ONE ATSer that has done this.




posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 10:37 AM
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Good stuff . That picture is worth a thousand words beautiful !

Yes im gonna try that to when i move into my own house . I would like to do that for venus and mars and the sun hell why not the whole solar system lool . That would be so awesome to see the whole solar system in a slideshow movie type thing !



The things we can see today all from our computers in the comfort of our own home ! GG technology sometimes you really come thru .



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 11:25 AM
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That's an awesome picture! Amazing really. a figure 8 on its side is also the infinity symbol...very cool post op!



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


It is not the sun that travels in that configuration. Its earth that travels in that configuration around the sun.



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


If it's a picture of the sun over time, why are the shadows in the wrong place?



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


Ah yes. Good point my man.

A metal slip on my part.

Thank you for the correction.

Star.... (ugh.... not the way I like to give them, but...when it's earned, it's earned)



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by irgust
reply to post by anon72
 


If it's a picture of the sun over time, why are the shadows in the wrong place?


2nd paragraph below the picture. Last sentence.

A separate picture of the neighborhood taken from the same location but at a different time of day was digitally composited into the foreground




posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 12:38 PM
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Here is one from Mars.





apod.nasa.gov...
Martian Analemma
Digital Illustration Credit & Copyright: Dennis Mammana (Skyscapes)
Explanation: On planet Earth, an analemma is the figure-8 loop you get when you mark the position of the Sun at the same time each day throughout the year. But similarly marking the position of the Sun in the Martian sky would produce the simpler, stretched pear shape in this digital illustration, based on the Mars Pathfinder project's famous Presidential Panorama view from the surface. The simulation shows the late afternoon Sun that would have been seen from the Sagan Memorial Station once every 30 Martian days (sols) beginning on Pathfinder's Sol 24 (July 29, 1997). Slightly less bright, the simulated Sun is only about two thirds the size as seen from Earth, while the Martian dust, responsible for the reddish sky of Mars, also scatters some blue light around the solar disk.


 
Mod Note: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.
As well please link your sources.

edit on Wed Dec 29 2010 by Jbird because: added ex tags and source



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 12:56 PM
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Here is another one from Mars.




And a few more from Earth.

















posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by spy66
reply to post by anon72
 


It is not the sun that travels in that configuration. Its earth that travels in that configuration around the sun.



The Sun is also travelling as the Galaxy Turns. (Sounds like a universal soap opera ).(Spins)
edit on 29-12-2010 by Mr. D because: added (Spins)



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 01:17 PM
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the universe is perfect...thanks OP



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by heineken
 


Well, I don't know if the universe is perfect but it sure is beautiful to see.

I'm glad you liked the thread.

The Sun, another marvel, that we take for granted. IMO



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 05:28 PM
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To end all,the earth does wobble which forms this figure 8as it rotates around the sun



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 06:17 PM
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Definitely interesting, wonder what 2011 will look like.



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 06:39 PM
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You know what's amazing is that in the OP picture you can see the guys shadow and his camera is set up on a tripod, either he left it there for an entire year or he set it up in the exact same position every day very accurately!



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:17 PM
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Originally posted by roughycannon
You know what's amazing is that in the OP picture you can see the guys shadow and his camera is set up on a tripod, either he left it there for an entire year or he set it up in the exact same position every day very accurately!


You stopped reading the thread after you posted!


Originally posted by ohiotim2112

Originally posted by irgust
reply to post by anon72
 


If it's a picture of the sun over time, why are the shadows in the wrong place?


2nd paragraph below the picture. Last sentence.

A separate picture of the neighborhood taken from the same location but at a different time of day was digitally composited into the foreground



[ot]Looking at the other images, they are amazing. I had no idea, this is as good as the thread Chadwickus the other day, www.abovetopsecret.com... - Pinhole timelapse.

It's interesting that the figure 8 is the same dimensions from everywhere on the planet - so it appears.

Another one I have to try !!

8]



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:42 PM
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can anyone explain to me why it makes a figure 8 at all? shouldn't it just look more or less exactly like the pinhole times lapse on chad's thread?

-B.M



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by B.Morrison
 


One is a daily exposure of the sun's position (one each day) over an entire year.



knowing that Earth's average solar day is almost exactly 24 hours, an analemma can be traced by plotting the position of the Sun as viewed from a fixed position on Earth at the same time every day for an entire year.


Analemma

The other - the pinhole photography - is (I believe - or is intended to approximate) a single six month exposure. If you did it for 12 months, the long streams of light would appear to travel in a broad, multi-banded figure eight as well. (I believe.)

edit on 12/29/2010 by AceWombat04 because: typo



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 


Ok... I very well might be wrong here.... But doesn't the sun just sit there in the middle of our solar system and the planets follow a path around the sun?

Still neat picture....



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 09:05 PM
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Cool picture! But why are the shadows off? it seems like he is looking north and the sun is coming from the east but the picture has the sun in front of it. look at the hydrant.





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