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Soon, You Will Be Able to PRINT Your Own Food!!!

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posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 09:33 AM
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Soon, You Will Be Able to Print Your Food

I know I for one will not be a fan of this. I cant imagine getting my family dinner from a printer or a syringe, I rather stick with the crap that is already being offered to us. Who comes up with these kinds of things? Just another way to keep people fat and lazy at home, or pretending that it's a fast, safe way to make a quick dinner for a family under a busy or hectic schedule. Or because recalls are popping up everywhere at an alarming rate, this is the future of safe food? I dont see the benefits or the logic of this. At the end of the day all they see are dollar signs.


Just pop the raw food "inks" in the top, load the recipe - or 'FabApp' - and the machine would do the rest. "FabApps would allow you to tweak your foods taste, texture and other properties," says Dr Jeffrey Ian Lipton, who leads the project. "Maybe you really love biscuits, but want them extra flaky. You would change the slider and the recipe and the instructions would adjust accordingly." Currently, the food printer's "inks" are limited to "anything that can be extruded from a syringe" (luckily that includes the four major food groups: Liquid chocolate, liquid cookie dough, liquid cheese, and liquid cake batter). But the team is working on turning other ingredients into syringe-extrudable materials—and they've had some successes, like cookies, and chocolate, and, oh my God, "designer domes made of turkey meat." And there's nothing weird about that at all! No, nothing completely and utterly horrifying about the fact that the endpoint of technological modernity is our food being squeezed out of a syringe in prearranged patterns. If anything, this will improve The Food Experience, according to chef Homaro Cantu of Chicago's Moto, who has, and you may want to get a vomit bag here, "printed sushi using an ink jet printer": Long-term, the team believes that people will take to the technology by creating their own 3D printable food recipe social networks with everyone improving on each other's creations. "3D printing will do for food what e-mail and instant messaging did for communication," says Mr Cantu.


And this is the Scientists at Cornell University's Computational Synthesis Lab that's developing the latest in "food technology". I would like to know what you guys think of this, honestly, if this was available to you and your family, would you offer it to them?

Gawker


edit on 29-12-2010 by WeBrooklyn because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 09:42 AM
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It reminds me of the beginning of the food replicator tech from Star Trek. It sounds like it could be a great idea especially for countries that have major food shortages.



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by QBSneak000
 





It reminds me of the beginning of the food replicator tech from Star Trek. It sounds like it could be a great idea especially for countries that have major food shortages.


Some people might think of it as an advantage but would they really benefit from it?



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by WeBrooklyn
 


Why wouldn't we? its yet another food source and considering that there's a lot of people in the world going hungry. Heck, I would try it....as long as it could make crispy bacon.

Think of what this tech will be like in 20 years....probably very much like the Star Trek replicators. Maybe I just haven't had enough coffee yet this morning but what would be the disadvantages of this tech?

Edit to add: As long as the nutritional values of the food remain or made even healthier its a step in the right direction. I think it would also be a great benefit for long space trips (saves on space and weight) or even colonization of the moon or Mars.

edit on 29-12-2010 by QBSneak000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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The BIG question is whether you can "print" your own beer!

Why spend an entire afternoon brewing when you can just print? Me likey!
edit on 29-12-2010 by bozzchem because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 03:24 PM
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This would be a great tech, but as another poster said, if it doesn't have the nutritional value, it's worthless.

The tech is there, but how we use it, like all things, is the deciding factor in whether or not the tech is good.

Example is atomic processes. either we make weapons or energy out of it.. energy good, weapons, not so much.

If monsanto got their hands on this, it'll be bad. If big pharma got a hold of this, it'd be even worse.

If we fortified the food ink in good ways, with nutrients, and vitamins and minerals, it would be great.

"With great power comes great responsibility!"



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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This is the stupidest idea i have ever seen. It isn't anything special...it is taking food in an envelope (ultra processed food....yeah, that will help cancer and obesity rates) and putting it in an extruded design. Yuck.

I have a hard enough time choking down what passes as food in most places now a days. i am an avid cook, and really do make some 5 star meals in my kitchen. The thought of this is as revolting as you can get.

Might as well serve up freshly squeezed dookie.



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by QBSneak000
 





Why wouldn't we? its yet another food source and considering that there's a lot of people in the world going hungry. Heck, I would try it....as long as it could make crispy bacon. Think of what this tech will be like in 20 years....probably very much like the Star Trek replicators. Maybe I just haven't had enough coffee yet this morning but what would be the disadvantages of this tech? Edit to add: As long as the nutritional values of the food remain or made even healthier its a step in the right direction. I think it would also be a great benefit for long space trips (saves on space and weight) or even colonization of the moon or Mars.


I can agree when you say it can work for long space trips and such but for Mass Consumption? It might sound healthy now and i guess to some people tempting but I dont doubt that tptb or Monsanto or whoever is on the depopulation train will get their hands on this.



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by bozzchem
 





The BIG question is whether you can "print" your own beer! Why spend an entire afternoon brewing when you can just print? Me likey!


well my friend, I read today you can deep fry your beer!

I wouldnt want printed beer give me the real stuff!



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Cygnis
 





This would be a great tech, but as another poster said, if it doesn't have the nutritional value, it's worthless. The tech is there, but how we use it, like all things, is the deciding factor in whether or not the tech is good. Example is atomic processes. either we make weapons or energy out of it.. energy good, weapons, not so much. If monsanto got their hands on this, it'll be bad. If big pharma got a hold of this, it'd be even worse. If we fortified the food ink in good ways, with nutrients, and vitamins and minerals, it would be great. "With great power comes great responsibility!"


And this is pretty much what I was thinking, Monsanto, Pharma, Gov, and whoever else is poisoning our food and shoving all that crap in there. This might work for some people and maybe I'm old fashioned (im 26, im old!), but I wouldnt want this to be the norm in terms of how we eat in 20+ years



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 





This is the stupidest idea i have ever seen. It isn't anything special...it is taking food in an envelope (ultra processed food....yeah, that will help cancer and obesity rates) and putting it in an extruded design. Yuck. I have a hard enough time choking down what passes as food in most places now a days. i am an avid cook, and really do make some 5 star meals in my kitchen. The thought of this is as revolting as you can get. Might as well serve up freshly squeezed dookie.


I agree with your post and thats another thing. Will it be safe going through the process? I mean this is so out of the norm, print your food from your computer while paying bills online and posting on Facebook. I dont want it to be where this is the only choice we are gonna have in a few short years.



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:20 PM
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Originally posted by WeBrooklyn
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 





This is the stupidest idea i have ever seen. It isn't anything special...it is taking food in an envelope (ultra processed food....yeah, that will help cancer and obesity rates) and putting it in an extruded design. Yuck. I have a hard enough time choking down what passes as food in most places now a days. i am an avid cook, and really do make some 5 star meals in my kitchen. The thought of this is as revolting as you can get. Might as well serve up freshly squeezed dookie.


I agree with your post and thats another thing. Will it be safe going through the process? I mean this is so out of the norm, print your food from your computer while paying bills online and posting on Facebook. I dont want it to be where this is the only choice we are gonna have in a few short years.


well, i have a 30-30, and live in a state that is currently over run by hogs, and has ample deer. That won't happen to me as long as i can walk.



posted on Dec, 29 2010 @ 07:32 PM
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lol, i could go for it!

keeping it for confections like ferrero rocher, peanutbutter cups, milky ways, etc!


but a turkey sandwich, no way.

yeah, texture would be a problem with this.

there goes the teeth.



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