It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Kiesha Crowther under investigation as fraud. Salish and Kootenai tribe releases statement.

page: 3
21
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 07:45 AM
link   
Ive been reading through the posts on this thread and, for the life of me, I cant understand what is wrong with this woman charging money for the work she does. Morally what is wrong with providing a service and asking for some renumeration. Psychotherapists do it, MD's do it, politicians do it, law enforcement does it, is there anyone out there who doesnt get paid for the work that they do. She makes good points, her message is fundamentally good, why not get paid? She, like the rest of us has to make a living, am I missing a fundamental unwritten code that says if the message is spiritual, the person cant expect some form of payment? She obviously has some native american roots, she has something to say that relates to native american philosophy, is she a shaman? does she regard herself as a shaman? Does anyone definitively know? What are the overall Sioux community authorities saying about this? If she hasnt been conveyed shaman status by the tribe, then she shouldnt be using the title, obviously, but at this stage how much do we know? Too many questions in relation to this, limited concrete answers. Does any one know if this woman is definitely a fraud, or are you all jumping on the negativity bandwagon?? Whats your thoughts?




posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 08:00 AM
link   

Originally posted by IAMIAM
[ So, I here by declare her a Shaman of the Tribe of Man.
As I am the only one who seems to recognise this tribe, there is no one to dispute me declaring her a Shaman of said tribe.

Anyone else want to be a Shaman of the Tribe of Man? If so, it is so, free of charge.




great, I'll be one of those too

I can add that title to the one i already have, back many years ago i became a BooHoo, of the Neo-American Church of Divine-Toad-Sweat... that was free-of-charge too... if i recall the org. came out of the Yuppie movement



...and i was in deep thought about your stipulation that the little grandmother encourage others to plant 'fruit' trees in her position as an Earth shaman...does that have any connection or synchronicity with the repeal of 'Don't Ask don't Tell'



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 08:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by zcflint05


"The Message Is Good"? What is so good about bozo Norway Spiral predictions, just because she's making 2012 predictions that "is good"? What, like the basic "lie" that the death of the gulf stream would somehow create an ecological disaster? That is a LIE, end of story.


This is a 'lie'? Then many scientists and ecologists must also be lying.

Please see the thread: www.abovetopsecret.com...
which refers to a report on the Gulf Oil Spill by Tom Termotto. The first two paragraphs of this lengthy report:



It is with deep regret that we publish this report. We do not take this responsibility lightly, as the consequences of the following observations are of such great import and have such far-reaching ramifications for the entire planet. Truly, the fate of the oceans of the world hangs in the balance, as does the future of humankind.

The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) does not exist in isolation and is, in fact, connected to the Seven Seas. Hence, we publish these findings in order that the world community will come together to further contemplate this dire and demanding predicament. We also do so with the hope that an appropriate global response will be formulated, and acted upon, for the sake of future generations. It is the most basic responsibility for every civilization to leave their world in a better condition than that which they inherited from their forbears.


phoenixrisingfromthegulf.wordpress.com...



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 08:33 AM
link   
double post deleted
edit on 30-12-2010 by wcitizen because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 09:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by Anam Gra
Ive been reading through the posts on this thread and, for the life of me, I cant understand what is wrong with this woman charging money for the work she does. Morally what is wrong with providing a service and asking for some renumeration. Psychotherapists do it, MD's do it, politicians do it, law enforcement does it, is there anyone out there who doesnt get paid for the work that they do. She makes good points, her message is fundamentally good, why not get paid? She, like the rest of us has to make a living, am I missing a fundamental unwritten code that says if the message is spiritual, the person cant expect some form of payment? She obviously has some native american roots, she has something to say that relates to native american philosophy, is she a shaman? does she regard herself as a shaman? Does anyone definitively know? What are the overall Sioux community authorities saying about this? If she hasnt been conveyed shaman status by the tribe, then she shouldnt be using the title, obviously, but at this stage how much do we know? Too many questions in relation to this, limited concrete answers. Does any one know if this woman is definitely a fraud, or are you all jumping on the negativity bandwagon?? Whats your thoughts?


My friend,

Here is the problem with conveying a spiritual message with money attached. Whether we admit it to ourselves or not, money IS the problem. With money we place value on the contributions of our services and goods to one another. We elevate the status and contributions of some over others even though we are all contributing in ways that need to be contributed according to our unique capabilities and drives. It is a system of inequity and we all know this in our heart. Thus, when we see money attached to something supposedly pure, like spiritual guidance, we are revolted by it.

If we have been indoctrinated into accepting spiritual services long enough, we ignore this feeling and accept it. Try getting a Priest to officate a wedding or a Rabbi a Bahmitzva as an example.

Unfortuantely, we have been hooked on money and inequality for so long, it is hard to imagine a world without it. Those that can, will see a world of wonder where all assist all to make this world the heaven it was intended to be.

Let us hope.

With Love,

Your Brother



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 09:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by St Udio
...and i was in deep thought about your stipulation that the little grandmother encourage others to plant 'fruit' trees in her position as an Earth shaman...does that have any connection or synchronicity with the repeal of 'Don't Ask don't Tell'


LOL Absolutely NOT!

But if it takes fruit to plant fruit, I will be just as happy.

With Love,

Your Brother



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 10:58 AM
link   
Looks like the owner of this video updates on the situation daily. The consistancy of Kiesha's stories seem to unravel often.


On that note, as a Miniconjou I am offended by Kiesha's appropriation of traditions. As it is the people struggle to preserve our language, culture, and for her to come along and sell them off to the highest paying customer is beyond offensive to me and many. Unfortunately this has been happening for years on end and it's nearly impossible to stop them because there's always gonna be a non native who's wanting a dances with wolves experience. It's a good film but I think many people saw it and decided they wanted to be a skin too.

You know what? I ain't got a problem with a white man wanting to walk the red road, or learn some teachings if it's done respectfully so long as he doesn't set up a sweat lodge and start charging for it or tell people he's really an ndn when he's not, or try to claim ancestors he doesn't have. I will tell you that more and more of the people are not wanting non natives at the sacred altars. That's our right.

Kiesha has been telling people one concocted story after another and it's catching up to her. You got these people saying "don't care about her lies, just care about her message of love" OK. Well if you're gonna teach about love let's teach honesty too.

One more thing to note here is when one is a medicine person for a tribe everyone knows who their kin is. Everyone knows where they come from but Kiesha hides hers. A medicine person tends to live poorly among their tribe and would not charge hundreds of dollars for anything. I can't believe people are gonna pay this woman about $200 just to figure out their totem animal. So that's all I'm going to say about that and will leave other's to make their own judgement.



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 11:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by Anam Gra
Ive been reading through the posts on this thread and, for the life of me, I cant understand what is wrong with this woman charging money for the work she does. Morally what is wrong with providing a service and asking for some renumeration.

It's not the service and remuneration. It's that she's pretending to be a certified spiritual leader of tribes and she's making up traditions that are not their traditions and presenting them as her own.

Let me put it in ways you might understand more easily: Suppose a practitioner of Voodoo who grew up in Haiti suddenly started walking around, saying he was the Catholic Pope and telling Catholics that Jesus practiced a message of running out and stealing cars and food and tv sets from your neighbors and then preaching the word that sharing the wealth by stealing is what Jesus really taught and as the Pope he's the only one who can explain this true religion.

Native Americans feel they have had everything stolen from them -- land, freedom, economic opportunity -- and culture. Forced to play the part of "evil savages" in "wild west medicine shows" (true fact), demonized in films ("Cowboys vs Indians" sort of thing) and to add to the indignity, forced conversion by Protestant missionaries who simply took children away from their families, sent them to mission schools a thousand miles away, punished them for speaking their native language or holding on to traditions... and so on and so forth.

Then comes the "new age" where people decide what Native American religion and tradition was going to be, including a forced acceptance of the Christian god as one of their own gods.

And then... to add insult to injury ... "prophets" whose only contact with the Native Americans was reading about the tribes in a history book start showing up, teaching shamanism (and often in ways that are dangerous or have caused deaths) and proclaim themselves to be elders. They see their culture being stolen and their children starting to believe these fake Indians.

Let her present herself as a "star child" or make up some sort of title.


She obviously has some native american roots,


So do most Americans. This doesn't make us Native Americans or mean we're in contact with what they believed.


she has something to say that relates to native american philosophy,

And it's dead wrong.


is she a shaman?

By their traditions, no. They have a name for their shamans, and it isn't "shaman." (I have a Native American background, too...but I studied the tribes in college and I've spoken to a number of real Native Americans and have gone to powwows. One friend and two acquaintances ARE real shamans (recognized by their tribe) and they are not very kind in their remarks about people like Crowther.


does she regard herself as a shaman?

She does. She may have gone through some sort of "initiation" by another "new age" fraud who said they were a shaman. This doesn't make her a shaman any more than my nickname ("Little Dragon") makes me a dragon.


Does anyone definitively know?

Oh yes. The REAL shamans do, and they're the ones who started the ruckus.


What are the overall Sioux community authorities saying about this?

I can't speak for them but I do know that what she's teaching is a type of New Age Spiritualism mixed with Christianity and is nothing at all like the Sioux original traditions. I suspect you'll find they're pretty hopped up about her, too.



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 11:59 AM
link   
here's a good example of someone who basically does the same, pretending to be some wanna' be high holy spiritual native.

source


February 4, 2010 Guru Indicted in 3 Deaths at Arizona Sweat Lodge By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD LOS ANGELES — A New Age motivational speaker who led a sweat lodge ceremony in Arizona last year in which three people died was indicted Wednesday on manslaughter charges despite his claims he did nothing wrong. James A. Ray, president of James Ray International, a multimillion-dollar company in Carlsbad, Calif., that promises followers a path to “harmonic wealth in all areas of your life,” was arrested at a law office in Prescott, Ariz., not far from the Sedona retreat where the fatal Oct. 8 ceremony was held. He was jailed in lieu of $5 million bond, said a statement by Sheriff Steve Waugh of Yavapai County. Sheriff Waugh said he “hopes the families of the three victims will now have some measure of closure to this tragedy.” He declined to be interviewed. The victims, Kirby Brown, 38, of Westtown, N.Y.; James Shore, 40, of Milwaukee; and Liz Neuman, 49, of Prior Lake, Minn., were overcome in the two-hour “spiritual warrior” ceremony, in which hot rocks were placed inside a tent so the 55 participants could sweat out whatever was ailing their souls. Twenty others suffered heat-related injuries. Participants have said Mr. Ray ignored signs that people were falling into distress in the pitch-dark tent and said things like “it’s a good day to die” in his zeal to keep the ceremony going. Several lawsuits have alleged negligence and fraud. Virginia Brown, Ms. Brown’s mother, said Wednesday in an interview, “This indictment does not bring my daughter back, so it is very upsetting.” Denouncing Mr. Ray as a “fraud,” she added, “James Ray teaches that people need to take responsibility for their actions, and he clearly has not done that.” Mr. Ray had recently taken his case to the court of public opinion, with his lawyers issuing lengthy letters last month providing their account of what happened and asserting that many damaging statements made by witnesses to the police were inaccurate or taken out of context. They likened Mr. Ray to a driven coach but one who did not commit any crime and did what he could after learning people were in trouble. Mr. Ray said as much in an interview with New York magazine in its Jan. 24 issue; he displayed the article on his Web site. A lawyer for Mr. Ray, Luis Li, called the charges unjust and said “this was a terrible accident — but it was an accident, not a criminal act.” “James Ray cooperated at every step of the way, providing information and witnesses to the authorities showing that no one could have foreseen this accident,” Mr. Li said, adding, “We will now present this evidence in a court of law, and we are confident that Mr. Ray will be exonerated.” He has been a high-profile self-help guru for years, with free seminars and frequent television appearances that recruit hundreds of followers to paid events. The five-day retreat, at the Angel Valley Spiritual Retreat Center, was among many held in Sedona, whose red rocks and mountains emit mystical energy to some, and simply peace and solace to others. A program for the retreat told participants “that your future holds the most difficult battles, as well as the greatest of victories.” It went on, “As you can imagine, Spiritual Warrior will push you beyond your perceived limits.”



posted on Dec, 31 2010 @ 05:53 PM
link   
There are many, many "rogue" Native Americans, as well, running around and claiming they're spiritual teachers, shamans, and what-have-you. Maybe it was one of those who told Keisha she was the "chosen one" and should establish a "tribe of many colors." He probably laughed his a** off afterwards.

One giveaway should have been that Native Americans usually don't have shamans but medicine men/women. The word "shaman," as far as I know, stems from a Siberian native tribe and some rainforest tribes, but is not used in North America.

Back in the day, I was very impressed/enamored by so-called Native American teachers as well -- I even had one as "my" teacher and until only a few years ago went to a so-called "Elders Gathering" here in Vermont that is run by Dhyani Ywahoo, author of "Voices of the Ancestors."

Turned out that my "teacher" back then as well Madam Ywahoo were frauds and swindlers. Dhyani, for example, claims that she's the keeper of the sacred pipe for the Cherokee (I believe -- it's been a while since I researched all that), as well as a descendant of the special Ywahoo "lineage" and thus a seventh-generation peacekeeper for the tribe, a supposedly very sacred task.

I stumbled over the NA forum "New Age Frauds and Plastic Shamans" or NAFPS, for short, and read some very unflattering things about Dhyani. To verify those, I wrote an email to the Cherokee Council on their official website, and they confirmed that a) there is no such thing as a special "Ywahoo lineage" or a peacekeeper; and b) the Cherokee are one of the tribes that don't even HAVE a sacred pipe (unlike the Lakota Sioux, for example). The audacity!!

I guess these people figure they can get away with it because the tribes don't have a lot of exposure; even if they do have a website etc., honestly, who actually searches for genuine Native American websites and reads them? I don't know anyone. Even me finding the NAFPS forum was mere coincidence (well, OK, I don't believe in coincidences).

Basic fact is that most NAs don't want "white people" and New Agers to desecrate and imitate their sacred rituals, and they condemn everyone, white or red, who makes money teaching "sacred ceremonies" or running prayer circles or sweat lodges.

But not just that: they don't want to share their ceremonies and spirituality AT ALL with white people. Their attitude is, they are theirs and you can only really understand them fully if you've grown up in a NA community and with the old traditions. They're basically like, "Dudes, you have your own religions and stuff, why do you have to steal ours?"

Which is understandable, but it took me a long time to accept it, since I always felt very drawn to this nature-oriented spirituality so deeply connected to everything... but at some point I realized that I, too, was only performing New Agey types of rituals thinking they were genuine NA. Did you know, for example, that the medicine wheel is not an ancient NA tradition, but a very recent invention made by Sun Bear around the 1970s?

I guess that's just one example. You're right, Keisha seems honest and well meaning, but from the first video I saw of her, she didn't strike me as the brightest match in the box, if you get my drift. Very well possible that some "NA leader" told her some BS and she swallowed it hook, line, and sinker because it made her feel so great. Who knows... I'm sure most people, if they were told they were "special" and "chosen" and had a "sacred mission in life," especially if it was someone with a lot credibility who told them that, would not ask too many questions. People believe what they want to believe... that's why con artists are so successful.



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 12:35 AM
link   
Kiesha Crowther's story seems to unravel even further. Here's an interesting blog someone put up detailing a few things. It looks new but interesting.

firstnationsdiscussculturaltheft.blogspot.com...



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 12:38 AM
link   
Another good video.



posted on Jan, 4 2011 @ 12:46 AM
link   
reply to post by sylvie
 


This is true. There are many running around charging for ceremonies like Adam Yellowbird. He is a shame to his people. We have alot of Mayans claiming to be grandfathers or daykeepers. I had a friend go to a meet up to see Hun Batz Men who is another one claiming to be a daykeeper. She ended up meeting up with him down in the Yucatan and found out that this man is abusive and beats his dogs. People have to be careful. Just because someone tells you they are a leader or are an important wisdom keeper doesn't make it so. Dhyani is a well known swindler as is Mary Thunder. Or Elizabeth Mary Thunder who runs her fake sweat lodges for money.


edit on 4-1-2011 by Thunder heart woman because: additional info



posted on Jan, 11 2011 @ 03:36 PM
link   
Tribe of Many Colors or Tribe of Many Dollars?
By Dr. Al Carroll

Kiesha Crowther AKA “Little Grandmother” has garnered a lot of attention, over a thousand followers, perhaps millions in cash, and even more controversy in less than two years. ...Falsely claiming to be the “shaman” for the “Sioux Salish tribe,” Crowther has gathered an all white, mostly European “Tribe of Many Colors” around her with bizarre claims. Native activists and former followers have vowed to oppose her and expose her.

From Santa Fe to Sweden, Denmark, Germany, and the Netherlands, and soon to that most “American Indian” of places, Palm Springs, Kiesha Crowther draws crowds of hundreds with each gathering of ceremony selling, charging from several hundred to up to $6,000 a person. Crowther is a small red haired woman of 33, yet looks young enough to be a teenager. Adding to the strangeness, Crowther calls herself “Little Grandmother” (she is not one) and often talks in a little girl voice with fanciful (and largely false) stories about her childhood.

Crowther mixes in stories of vulnerability with dire prophecies of doom and fantastic claims, none of which are true. She claims to be the “shaman” for the “Sioux Salish tribe.” She claims to be the descendant of famous Lakota and Salish leaders, with a “fullblood Indian mother” and a grandmother supposedly on the reservation. Crowther claims to be made “shaman” by an alleged Salish elder named Falling Feathers. She claims to be recognized by dozens of tribes from New Zealand to United States to the Arctic Circle to Scandinavia to Central America. She claims to have been recognized by Native tribes at as young as age eight and to be the fulfillment of a supposed prophecy about a “fair haired girl.” She even suggests in one video that she is the returned White Buffalo Calf Woman of Lakota prophecy, a claim sure to outrage the Plains Indian tribes that hold the prophecy sacred.

Yet not a single one of these claims are true. Most are extremely obvious lies.

Who Is The Real Kiesha Crowther?

The real Kiesha Crowther was born Kiesha Rae Kreps in Sanford, Colorado, to a white middle class background, with a truck driver father and a mother owning small businesses. Her mother’s maiden name is Rodda. The Salish tribe she claims to have ancestry from do not have a single known person named Crowther, Kreps, or Rodda, either enrolled or known to the small and close knit community. (Most Salish have Irish last names given them by missionaries. A few Salish have traditional names, but none are ever translated into English.) The Salish elders in fact issued a public statement, saying officially she is not their “shaman,” asking her to quit claiming so, and pointing out no Salish had ever even heard of her. Their statement in full is at the end of this article.

Contrary to Crowther/Krep’s claim of a “fullblood Indian” mother and grandmother, there is no evidence of any Native ancestry in her family line. Her family ancestry has been traced back to her great-grandparents from England. Every census form lists all of her ancestors as white. No one else in the family has ever claimed to be or identified as American Indian, including her mother and grandmother. The only Natives in the family are two children (with no relation by blood) adopted by an uncle near Missoula, Montana. Kiesha Crowther’s mother and other family members have in fact urged her repeatedly to quit lying about the family ancestry.

Kiesha Kreps was raised as a Mormon and baptized into the Mormon Church at age eight at the same time she claims to have been recognized by Indian tribes and living alone in the woods. Crowther was married in the Mormon Church in Littleton, Colorado, and was a practicing member of the church only two years ago. She is married with two children, but separated from her husband and estranged from her entire family due to her “calling.”

In fact, absolutely no one in her family backs her claims of Native ancestry or being a “shaman.” A source very close to the family called her a “fraud” and “elaborate liar.” Numerous stories Kiesha Crowther tells at paid ceremonies are described as “lies,” such as claiming to have lived alone in the woods, nursing a dying owl, and being recognized by tribal leaders. The young Kiesha Kreps was actually fairly popular in school and not the lonely isolated kid she claims. Crowther's stranger lies include once giving a "Viking treasure ring" to her sister, who then noted one could see the trademark symbol on it.

The same source close to the family also claims Crowther’s veterinary degree is fake and came from an online degree mill, with the "degree" printed in notebook style paper rather than the stock paper degrees generally come on. It was also confirmed an animal rescue group Crowther claimed to have started is phony. The same source says Crowther plagiarized the poems she claimed to write and largely copied the paintings and other artwork she did.

Even Kiesha Crowther’s online biography as an artist is filled with falsehoods. She claimed to have been awarded Poet of the Year in 2003, 2004, and 2005 in separate cities. The “awards” are given out by the International Society of Poets, a pay to publish outfit that will include you in vanity editions for twenty five dollars each. She claimed her poem “Reach For My Hands” was made into a song by the “Willow Folk Group.” There is no sign of such a group, but there is a Willow Folk Festival in England. She claimed one of her poems was published in a book, “Poems for Peace,” chosen by former First Lady Laura Bush. There is no sign of the book nor of Laura Bush’s involvement, unless one counts her refusing to show up at a gathering of poets reciting poems opposed to the Iraq War. Crowther’s bio also claims she was “awarded the Life Experience Bachelors and holds a Masters Degree of Art from Almeda University.” Almeda University is an unaccredited online degree mill. In a 2004 expose by CBS News, a reporter successfully got his dog awarded a degree from Almeda.

How It All Began For a Would Be Shaman

Kiesha Crowther/Krep’s claims of how she became a “shaman” have changed rapidly and dramatically in less than two years since she began. In April of 2010, Crowther made the claim she originally had gotten a phone call from a group of all the Salish elders who told her she was the “fair haired child of prophecy” and they had a sacred bundle waiting for her made centuries ago.

But in June of 2010, that account changed. She claims instead an unnamed “Sioux man” made her a shaman.

That same month, Crowther also claimed she was made shaman by a group of “grandmothers” of both the Salish and “Sioux” tribes.

(Note for non-Native people: Natives generally don’t refer to the “Sioux” since this is an outdated outsider’s term. The actual tribes are called the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakoda, often called collectively the Lakota. There are dozens of Lakota bands at reservations and reserves. The Salish is an entirely different people and culture.)

In December 2010, Crowther’s story changed dramatically. No longer was there any mention of groups of women elders, nor of “Sioux men.” Instead she now claims there was a single Salish elder she calls Falling Feathers who made her “shaman for the Sioux and Salish tribes.”

There is no evidence at all that Falling Feathers ever existed, other than Crowther’s claims. Crowther claims he was an important elder, so widely known she assumed he was speaking for all Salish elders. The Salish elders have never heard of him and neither have any other Salish contacted for this article. His alleged name does not fit typical Salish names, which are either Irish or traditional Salish names not translated into English.

Conveniently, Crowther claims Falling Feathers recently died. There is no mention on tribal sites of a prominent elder dying recently. Crowther’s supporter, manager, and longtime friend Jennifer Ferraro also claims Falling Feathers was a member of the “governing council” for the “Confederated Sioux Salish.” Neither of those exists, but there is a tribal council for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai. The Lakota bands and tribes, as mentioned before, are spread across over two dozen reservations and reserves.

Only a few days after her December statement, Crowther changed her story in the most drastic way yet. She now claims to have never been teaching Native ways at all. This despite dressing up in American Indian regalia (though it was a shirt only worn by Native males), using what she seems to have believed was American Indian face paint, using what she claims was a Native pipe, and claiming her initiation came from Native elders, or alternately, a single Native elder who has passed away no one else ever heard of.

Crowther has also continually claimed the endorsement of numerous indigenous elders and other religious leaders, without evidence. Many of those she claims are Native elders actually are imposters.

She claims the endorsement of Cherokee elders. None of the traditional Cherokee elders in the Eastern Band ever heard of her.

She claims to have been recognized as a shaman by “lamas of Nepal and Tibet.” There are hundreds of such Buddhist teachers, but the only one she ever named was Lakha Lama, whom she met in Sweden. Lakha Lama gave her a blessing when Crowther asked for one, but this is neither an endorsement nor recognition, only kind words. Buddhist lamas, like American Indian traditionalists, also condemn teaching for a fee, especially very high fees as Crowther does.

Crowther also for a time claimed Sammi elders in Sweden authorized and endorsed her. Then her claim was removed from her websites. She further claimed Inuit elders gave her a crystal “from the North Pole” and that she was “giving the crystal back to the Sammi” when she buried the crystal in Sweden. There is no land, only ice at the North Pole. Crystals do not form in ice, only in land. Geologists consulted for this story say it likely is an ordinary crystal bought in a shop for less than 200 dollars, one dug up by strip mining.

On one of her visits to Sweden she claimed all Native tribes recognized and endorsed her, and that she was shaman for all of them. Since there are over 500 tribes in the US alone, the absurdity of this claim is obvious.

More recently, Crowther also claimed she was made shaman by a “Sioux” named Grandmother Lota or Lootha. Crowther also claims to be related to “Sioux” she calls Ciqalah Lotah and Ciqala Jensen. Fluent Lakota speakers we spoke to pointed out those words do not exist in the Lakota language. No one in any of the Lakota communities we contacted ever heard of Crowther or the people she claims to be related to or authorized her.

Crowther also claims the endorsement of Don Alejandro Cirilo Perez, sometimes called Wandering Wolf. Perez is a Mayan leader who appears on a number of New Age sites. However, there is no evidence of Perez ever endorsing Crowther. Perez is actually on record as strongly disagreeing and even mocking the claims of Crowther and other that the world will end in 2012. The maker of a documentary on Perez and Crowther denounced in fierce terms the “exploitation” of Perez by New Agers such as Crowther.

Crowther also is an associate of and claims the endorsement of two imposters who falsely claim to be Native elders, Adam DeArmon, a white New Age operator in Sedona, and John Kimmey, a white New Ager barred from the Hopi reservation and condemned by Hopi spiritual leaders for selling ceremony and making false claims.

The (All White) Tribe of Many Colors

Why would a self styled “shaman” who spent most of two years claiming Native elders authorized her suddenly claims to have never been doing Native teachings? Numerous family and friends of Crowther’s followers, as well as former followers, began to ask Native activists about the authenticity of her claims. By September of 2010, the chorus of criticism began to rise and put Crowther and her management on the defensive.

Crowther’s following she dubbed the Tribe of Many Colors has some striking characteristics. It has absolutely no Native members at all (including Crowther.) Outside of a member of Crowther’s management team, all seem to be exclusively white. Much like the Tea Party, they are also prone to throwing around the claim that they are hated supposedly for being white.

Such a claim falls apart because many of her critics are themselves white, especially former followers. The claim is even more striking because of the racism in some of the imagery and words used by Crowther and her “tribe.” In one trip to Sweden, Crowther spoke about the alleged superiority of Swedish people over all others. Crowther frequently claims all Native elders, or even all Native people, are supporting her, waiting for her, and depend upon her and her message even for their very survival. Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. Most Natives never heard of her. Those that have are strongly opposed to her.

Who is behind Crowther’s rapid rise among New Age leaders? Our source very close to the family says Crowther has no computer skills nor business or organizing acumen, nothing that could account for her success except a vivid imagination. The same source attributes everything Crowther has done to two people and one group; Adam DeArmon AKA Adam Yellowbird, a white New Age operator in Sedona; Santa Fe Soul, which sponsors some of Crowther’s talks; and especially Crowther’s longtime friend Jennifer Ferraro. Our source described Fierro as a failed performance artist who claims to be Native but is actually Italian and Greek. Online discussions between Crowther and Ferraro seem to show Ferraro as the real brains of the operation, the power behind the throne, her manager, website operator, and even her director. Crowther defers to her in public talks, and Ferraro frequently talks in one messages to Crowther like a mother to a small child.

Our source close to the family is worried the Tribe of Many Colors will "become another Jonestown" and is at a loss for how her family can get her to see sense. Whether the “tribe” self destruct violently is yet to be seen, but they are extraordinarily intolerant of dissent or criticism of any kind. Its website was heavily censored, with any daring to question Crowther kicked out. Recently their website was so overwhelmed by dealing with criticism it was taken down entirely. Crowther’s inner circle, especially Ferraro, have begun throwing around legal threats at any who dare to critique Crowther. Ferraro, though she is not a lawyer, sent threats to sue to at least five people. The “tribe” also sent infiltrators to sites critical to Crowther to gather information on critics.

There are currently plans for a book by Crowther, and two documentaries, one favorable to her and one critical. There are also ongoing plans for protests of Crowther’s ceremony selling by Native activists and her many non-Native critics. The Salish tribal council is considering legal action. The controversy is not going away.

Dr. Al Carroll is a historian, professor, former Fulbright Scholar, and activist for Native causes. His first book is Medicine Bags and Dog Tags: American Indian Veterans From Colonial Times to the Second Iraq War from University of Nebraska Press.

Research for this article includes contributions by numerous activists, former followers, Sky Davis and T. Tavares, and a source very close to the Crowther family. Annika Banfeld translated articles and radio interviews from Swedish to English.

Statement of the Salish Elders:

"The Culture and Elders Committee of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation protect the intangible cultural resources of the tribes including language, songs, stories etc.

"No tribal Elders or elders have met with nor do they condone the claims and actions made by Kiesha Crowther.

"She is not their 'shaman', she has no right to claim this title and the Elders and elders of CSKT of the Flathead Reservation would like her to cease and desist immediately from making such false claims that erode the traditions that members of the CSKT Culture and Elders Committee are trying to preserve."

The posting of this statement came with the permission and urging of the Salish elders. Anyone doubting this message's authenticity can contact the Flathead Reservation.



posted on Jan, 11 2011 @ 04:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by Thunder heart woman
reply to post by sylvie
 


This is true. There are many running around charging for ceremonies like Adam Yellowbird. He is a shame to his people. We have alot of Mayans claiming to be grandfathers or daykeepers. I had a friend go to a meet up to see Hun Batz Men who is another one claiming to be a daykeeper. She ended up meeting up with him down in the Yucatan and found out that this man is abusive and beats his dogs. People have to be careful. Just because someone tells you they are a leader or are an important wisdom keeper doesn't make it so. Dhyani is a well known swindler as is Mary Thunder. Or Elizabeth Mary Thunder who runs her fake sweat lodges for money.


edit on 4-1-2011 by Thunder heart woman because: additional info


Adam "Yellowbird" is in reality a white guy named Adam DeArmon. He's about as NDN as Bill clinton.



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 07:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by Anam Gra
Ive been reading through the posts on this thread and, for the life of me, I cant understand what is wrong with this woman charging money for the work she does. Morally what is wrong with providing a service and asking for some renumeration. Psychotherapists do it, MD's do it, politicians do it, law enforcement does it, is there anyone out there who doesnt get paid for the work that they do. She makes good points, her message is fundamentally good, why not get paid? She, like the rest of us has to make a living, am I missing a fundamental unwritten code that says if the message is spiritual, the person cant expect some form of payment? She obviously has some native american roots, she has something to say that relates to native american philosophy, is she a shaman? does she regard herself as a shaman? Does anyone definitively know? What are the overall Sioux community authorities saying about this? If she hasnt been conveyed shaman status by the tribe, then she shouldnt be using the title, obviously, but at this stage how much do we know? Too many questions in relation to this, limited concrete answers. Does any one know if this woman is definitely a fraud, or are you all jumping on the negativity bandwagon?? Whats your thoughts?


There's couple major problems really, why it is wrong to charge in Kiesha's case:
First, none of the native american tribes or other indigenous people have recognized her as their spokesperson as she claimed, so she is basicly asking money from teaching something she has a) no right to teach, b) knows nothing about, c) isn't in line with traditional indigenous teachings that have been passed on from generation to generation. Of course, there are parts of "indigenous wisdom" mixed in, but then again, there are not just one absolute "indigenous truth".
Second, if she was teaching the native american way of spirituality (again, there is no one tradition, every tribe have their own), more or less ALL of the tribes agree that when money comes in, spirit flies out. There's nothing spiritual in selling teachings or healing, true medicine man/woman might accept gifts tho, but money is never discussed before the actual ceremony, because it lowers the spiritual energy, or what ever. In any case, what ever the reason is - money doesn't belong in native american spirituality. Ceremony is not for sale.
Third, the sacred items of native american spirituality shouldn't be used in public, paid ceremony. And there are certain elements that need to be fulfilled that you have right to use the pipe for example at all. Look Arvol Looking Horse's statements about ceremony and so on, lots of info there.
Fourth, despite the "goodness" of her message, she seems very reluctant to give any evidence herself to any of the claims, instead she is changing her story when something has been questioned, but she still keeps the "indigenous" "native american" "shaman" and "ancient wisdomkeeper" in the story in some form, so it is obvious it is used as a "sales tactic"... Salish and sioux, cherokee and even don alejandro of mayas have all stated that she is not speaking for them tho.

So in a way, in the way and form the "teachings" are sold with false claims, it is not acceptable. It is bit like some advert about miracle cure that then turns out to be something completely different. Altho, in the case of false advertizing, there are laws against it.

In any case, without commenting the message much more, altho I think there are good points in it, (some even better have been left out tho...). I just want to ask one question: If the whole base of the message is to "remember who you are" and make the world a better place, why to start with lies about who you are? When world needs more honest actions... And how is it really from love to disrespect native american elders by using them as a sales trick and say that everyone who questions her message is from "low energy" and will be removed from earth when shift happens? It is just the ways of main religions all over again, believe this and you will be saved.

The most interesting thing really is how people can even believe that the message is THE indegenous message when the main thing in it stems from I AM activity of the ascended master teachings (religious movement) that started in 30s... Here's wiki link to origins of "I AM": en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 10 2011 @ 08:37 AM
link   
i really don't see how this is her fault. she's selling a product. people are buying it. there's a sucker born every minute. she's providing delusion for delusional people. sounds fair.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 11:47 AM
link   

Originally posted by Byrd

Originally posted by Anam Gra


What are the overall Sioux community authorities saying about this?

I can't speak for them but I do know that what she's teaching is a type of New Age Spiritualism mixed with Christianity and is nothing at all like the Sioux original traditions. I suspect you'll find they're pretty hopped up about her, too.


I am enrolled with the Yanktonai Hunkpati Dakota nation of Crow Creek, South Dakota. We, the Dakota/Lakota/Nakota nations do not claim this woman. This woman needs to be stopped immediately. Women are not considered ready until they have passed their menopause to become medicine women. The menstrual cycle of women has too much power to be mixing with traditional ways. When women are on their moontime, they are obligated to stay away from partaking in ceremony.

Wade Crowe
edit on 27-2-2011 by quicksilverwade because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 04:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by Asktheanimals

I think it is time for the real shamans to come forward and speak to the world through the internet, they have messages of great importance to us all.
Should they fail to do so they may be losing the last chance they have for mankind to know what lies ahead for us all.



You know what message real shamans have for mankind?

Stop following people, and develop your own ability to hear the voice of God, the collective unconscious, the Divine intelligence, whatever you want to call it. Live a principled life, and that means dont let fear drive your actions, particularly the fear of not having enough money, and dont look for rationalizations to do what you feel/know intuitively to be wrong. Be that which you want to see in the world. Pour all your effort into living true, making yourself the truest example of an honorable person you can, and dont base your choices on what others are or are not doing.

The problem is not that the real shamans have failed to spread the message, the problem is that people would rather buy the message of the fake spiritualists.



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 04:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by IAMIAM

Hypocrites!



Ok, so let me get clear on this. You are too spiritually pure to judge her for lying, being a fraud, etc., but you arent too spiritually pure to judge the people who want to believe her?

I am also well aware that you are correct, in that many of the people who are butt hurt over her lying do NOT believe someone who just tells the honest truth, without setting themself up as a magical guru, or authority, and wrapping their message in rainbows and unicorns. I agree that that is frustrating.

But.........lets not pretend that she was doing us a favor somehow by spreading the "love and light" message in a totally fraudulent and self serving way. The end does not justify the means, and all she has done is made it even harder for someone authentic to be heard. Both by her theatrics, and her deception.


edit on 4-3-2011 by Illusionsaregrander because: fix a statement



new topics

top topics



 
21
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join