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The Tree of Life

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posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by micpsi
For those who are interested, here you will find the mathematical and scientific meanings of the cosmic blueprint called the "Tree of Life" (Hebrew: Otz Chiim) revealed for the first time ever and its amazing equivalence to the sacred geometries of other religions:
smphillips.8m.com...


Will this blueprint feed your neighbors during a food shortage my friend?

With Love,

Your Brother




posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 02:32 PM
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IAMIAM, I like your thoughts on this, a modern day johnny appleseed. Here in CO. we have heaps of evergreen type trees but I notice not many deciduous varieties, I'm in NW Denver suburbs...

We live near an enormous open space maintanined by the state, just might have to surreptitiously plant a few fruit bearing species in, near and around.

great idea!!!



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 02:44 PM
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I will admit, the parable of the Fig Tree was the inspiration.


lol! have you starting saving or planting seeds from what you eat yet? I've heard after a few generations natural purety returns, one of my fav subjects as well all the way to essential oils, inspired a few years back and still growing-

Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit-John15


The Lapps removed the brown outer layer and hung the strips of white inner bark under the eaves of their barns to dry. If food was plentiful the next winter, this bark was fed to their dogs and cattle, and was reported to be very fattening, but if other foods were scarce, the Lapps would grind this dried bark and make a famine bread of it, which was very nutritious, but, to Linnaeus's taste, not very palatable.

It is not usually realized how much the American Indians formerly depended on tree barks for food. The eastern Indians favored the barks from the pine family, especially that from the white pine, although the inner barks of other trees, such as black birch and slippery elm, were relished. www.ruralvermont.com...




Pine needles contain 5 times the vitamin C found in lemons..Think of it as a herbal tea. A handful of pine needles, or 1/4 cup fresh chopped needles steeped in boiling water for 10 to 15 minutes provide 100% of the U.S.R.D.A. of vitamin C. Pine soup (or tea) tastes like the pine forest smells..Certain Indian tribes used to peel young shoots of pine and use them as a green vegetable..Don't make the mistake of trying to eat the dead outer layer of the pine tree bark. It is the moist white living inner bark (cambrium layer) we are after. The cambrium is located just underneath the dead outer layer and it is here where the tree`s girth growth occurs. The best way to get a supply is to peel off some large chunks of bark, being careful not to girdle the tree lest you destroy it, the carefully fillet the moist layer of cambrium clinging to the inside of that. isurvivalskills.blogspot.com...




Yet, all parts of the rose, and especially the hips, are storehouses of Vitamin C and other important nutrients.

Compare the nutritional content of oranges to rose hips and you will find that rose hips contain 25 percent more iron, 20 to 40 percent more Vitamin C (depending upon variety), 25 times the Vitamin A, and 28 percent more calcium.

In addition, rose hips are a rich source of bioflavanoids, pectin, Vitamin E, selenium, manganese, and the B-complex vitamins. Rose hips also contain trace amounts of magnesium, potassium, sulfur and silicon.corditecountryshownotes.wordpress.com...


www.ars-grin.gov...


edit on 27-12-2010 by Rustami because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by Rustami
lol! have you starting saving or planting seeds from what you eat yet? I've heard after a few generations natural purety returns, one of my fav subjects as well all the way to essential oils, inspired a few years back and still growing-


Excellent addition my friend. I have tried pine needle tea. It is rather refreshing in my opinion. I have yet to try anything with slippery elm, but I will be looking. Many native elm tress were wiped out by dutch elms disease. This is another I may track down to re-introduce to the small woodlands around my neighborhood.

I am just getting started collecting seeds from the fruits we eat. It shouldn't take too long to have a good stock pile to work with.

Do you do your own distilling of essential oils?

It is a great and useful hobby. I got into it a while back when I was learning Alchemy. My first project was a basil oil which I still have today.

Thanks for the great post.

With Love,

Your Brother



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 10:42 PM
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cool, yea I kinda like the flavor also especially knowing the properties now, long story involving attaining a plot of land and an orchard and have yet to make my own, though I have alot of different EO's and use daily in many various ways even pretty much blame no sickness in @4 years (including close family) on them, as well as home pesticide and pest free for as long also and would be hard pressed narrowing down to 10 favorites, anyway here are a few more common trees/plants with benefits




Trees have many benefits and one of the most overlooked is its sap. Sap serves the tree as blood does the human body..Sweetgum has been used by Native Americans as a balm. Some cultures mix tobacco and sweet gum to help people sleep.. Sweetgum is made into a salve and sold under names like Copalm Blasam and Liquid Storax. It is used to treat skin cancer, diarrhea, ringworm and other conditions. www.centraltexastreecare.com...

According to drugs.com, pharmaceutical companies use gum arabic as an emulsifier or binder in drugs, and it can also inhibit growth of periodontic bacteria..



Willow bark is used to ease pain and reduce inflammation. There is good evidence that it does just that. Researchers believe that the chemical salicin, found in willow bark, is responsible for these effects. However, studies have identified several other components of willow bark that have antioxidant, fever-reducing, antiseptic, and immune-boosting properties. Some studies have shown willow is as effective as aspirin for reducing pain and inflammation (but not fever), and at a much lower dose.. Menstrual cramps, Flu www.umm.edu...



Seeds of the plant cannabis sativa, hemp seed, contain all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids necessary to maintain healthy human life. No other single plant source has the essential amino acids in such an easily digestible form, nor has the essential fatty acids in as perfect a ratio to meet human nutritional needs..Hemp is not unique in having all the essential amino acids in its embryonic seed. Flax seeds also contain all the essential amino acids as do many other seeds in the plant kingdom. What is unique about hemp seed protein is that 65% of it is globulin edistin. That is the highest in the plant kingdom. www.ratical.org...


And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so.-Gen1

and the fruit thereof shall be for meat, and the leaf thereof for medicine.-Eze47


edit on 27-12-2010 by Rustami because: (no reason given)


eh was looking for a better article on transforming front and backyard grass into Eden but this will have to do-With the trend towards “Going Green” lawns are being replaced with herbs, edible gardens and moveable gardens. With less emphasis on a green lawn there is a large decrease in the use of water, saving the family money and time. This is also creating more growing space.www.ourbackyardoasis.com...

what taste better than homegrown? not much
edit on 28-12-2010 by Rustami because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by IAMIAM
 


I'd advise against planting in wild areas. You could be introducing diseases and non-native species, which could cause further problems for the trees in that area,

edit on 27-12-2010 by PieKeeper because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by PieKeeper
reply to post by IAMIAM
 


I'd advise against planting in wild areas. You could be introducing diseases and non-native species, which could cause further problems for the trees in that area,

edit on 27-12-2010 by PieKeeper because: (no reason given)


Thanks for the advice. I am growing everything from seeds, thus little chance of introducing disease that isn't already in the area.

I am not too worried. If you saw the area I am talking about, all that can be done is improvement. The majority of the trees are already dead, just not fallen over yet. What is still alive is mainly pine and holly.

With love,

Your Brother



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 11:05 PM
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Of every tree in the garden you may freely eat, but you are not to take the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. Original sin; the tree was the most beautiful and fruitful in the garden and proved impossible to resist, one taste and our eyes were open to the temptation of sin, also difficult to resist. As a result, banishment and a curse that the soil would require toil and dedication to hard work in order to produce sustainance. A lesson to be learned, you have the seeds, prepare the soil, care for the seedling, grow your own tree of life and give thanks for what it produces for not only does the tree bear fruit, the fruit bears seed. Proliferate the growth of the tree of life, share with your neighbor. Teach the preperation of the soil and the care of the seedling so that each has the opportunity to harvest from their own tree of life. The tree that produces fruit that provides seed that produces tree's produces life.
edit on 27-12-2010 by authortobe because: grammatical error



posted on Dec, 30 2010 @ 02:00 PM
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I try to continue Native plant growth as much as possible. Somewhat like Johnny Appleseed but trying to absolutely avoid GMO/GE/frankenfood plants as many of them have Round Up Ready in the DNA of the plant to exterminate pests and sadly, many bees and other pollinators are struggling and many dying. Einstein spoke to the loss of bees and this may encourage more to become informed and learn how to hand pollinate as that is where it is headed. Take care



posted on Jan, 9 2011 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by IAMIAM
 


I feel that they, TPTB are truly altering our natural world, they're trying to destroy the bounty of nature and make this incredibly ungly NWO controlled slave type enviro GMO food. So if we want to go out in the woods, well they think they own it all. And all the food in abundance from nature, nuts, fruit, berries, etc, they've depleted or altered, and the fish, ,poisoned and virtually mutated. If you read about what they're doing with salmon and even talk of insect dna bing incorporated its just way too much.

Heritage seeds (not all hybrids are bad, they've made wonderful foods over the years that were still good for you, but improved, its a science, but careful selection of seeds and alot of heritage), nuts, trees, berries, food, herbs......maybe even seeding the forest. But anyones efforts can be undone by them, so it needs to be well thought out, how to do this, how to do it in numbers?



posted on Jan, 9 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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I own a farm out in the sticks of minnesota the land has been pasted down in my family for many generations ive lived here all my life and ive noticed alot of the hard woods like the oak trees have died from disease but when one dies i cut it down and use it for firewood i heat onley with wood..For each tree that dies i replace it with 2 and thats how its been with each generation thats lived here i usally replace with oak or apple trees so the paradise here on the farm thrives..there is many wild berrys such as raspberrys and blueberrys and its so much fun in the summer to pick them and make jam..But i understand what your talking about many places i use to go as a kid is now fenced off and the trees are dieing and never replaced and over ran with shrub and poison ivy its a shame what were doing to mother earth she has so much to give..I think what your doing is a wonderful thing i wish more people would repopulate the cost of food is so high and there is so much right on the land to eat and go around for everyone..a couple of years back i bought a food dehydrator i plant a garden every year what we dont eat i give away and some i dehydrate so nothing goes to waste..There is overwhelming, undeniable evidence that the world will run out of food in the years to come so it makes common sense to store food and repopulate the trees and wild berrys..thanks for your post it made me smile



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