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The Practical, Everyday Survivalist: An Overview...

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posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 01:36 AM
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The Practical, Everyday Survivalist: An Overview...



Just exactly what the title says...

I have been interested in and practiced Survivalist Tactics for the past 30 years. Basically ever sense joining the Marines..

In this thread I plan on posting the what, where, when, why and hows of my approach to survival in the hopes that maybe some of you will benefit from my experience and knowledge.

First let me say I am not "into" the bs of the typical survivalist..This is practical and workable...

I have a full time job.. I chose this profession in order to assist me in my one true love.. Survival and all of the aspects surrounding it..Such as Weapons (I'm an FBI Certified Firearms Instructor and Defensive Tactics Instructor) Skills such as Rappelling and rope work, practical hand to hand combat etc.. My profession?... Law Enforcement ...

I own a home, some cats and I am married.. All practical stuff that makes life worthwhile ..

But I still prepare and as this progresses I will tell you how and how to do it on a budget..

We will discuss

1. Your Bag
2. Vehicles
3. Weapons (Knives and Guns)
4. Basic Skills
5. Practice
6. Areas to go to practice (Fun time)
7. Medicines and Natural cures, herbs, plants etc
8. Food (Gathering, storing, preparing etc)

And much much more.. So stayed tuned in and lets see what happens..

I am also going to post some videos that will more accurately exemplify the particular subject...

Semper




posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 03:01 AM
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S&F looking forward to seeing a good common sense approach to the subject rather than the usual ...



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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S&F also from me. If you can do a little focus on "suburban base camp" survival, I would really appreciate it. I don't live on 40 acres in rural WV. I live in the suburbs of a major midwest city. Telling me to get up "the mountain" doesn't apply.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Lets discuss....
What and where do you want to begin?


S&F



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 03:18 PM
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Cool, looking forward to it! Thanks.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 04:07 PM
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this seems to be very interesting, i never really had training in survival, except what my dad taught me for hunting and survival ICE



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by semperfortis

We will discuss

1. Your Bag
2. Vehicles
3. Weapons (Knives and Guns)
4. Basic Skills
5. Practice
6. Areas to go to practice (Fun time)
7. Medicines and Natural cures, herbs, plants etc
8. Food (Gathering, storing, preparing etc)


You left one out... Physical conditioning. All the canned food, ammo, guns, knives and preparation are for naught if you can't perform physically. In a catastrophic survival scenario the only real survival gear that you may have is your body. You may have to travel some distance without conveyance. Endure heat, cold, altitude, water and be able to physically confront an aggressor sans weapons.

Just thought I might add that to the list...


CX

posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 04:20 PM
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Sounds good Semper, looking forward to learning and joining in with the thread.


Starred and flagged.

CX.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 
S&F to you for your thread i hope i goes well, as to being a informative. You seem to have a lot to offer, can not wait too see first post.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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Absolutely S AND F just on the forthcoming information...

I would love to hear from a REAL survivalist over the arm chair generals and their *tactical fat ass Amory*.

I have been trying to find GOOD survival videos on you tube (have went through hundreds) most all just people showing the 50 guns they have amassed or their mini convenient-store stock pile of food in the basement....



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Also looking forward to this thread. Since the Y2K scare (not that I thought it would really be an end of world thing) I have been gathering information on survival. We have an emergency plan in case of a threat to our home as well as a need to evacuate that includes our four canine friends. I really look forward to someone like you to bring it all together for us.

Semper Fi



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me

Originally posted by semperfortis

We will discuss

1. Your Bag
2. Vehicles
3. Weapons (Knives and Guns)
4. Basic Skills
5. Practice
6. Areas to go to practice (Fun time)
7. Medicines and Natural cures, herbs, plants etc
8. Food (Gathering, storing, preparing etc)


You left one out... Physical conditioning. All the canned food, ammo, guns, knives and preparation are for naught if you can't perform physically. In a catastrophic survival scenario the only real survival gear that you may have is your body. You may have to travel some distance without conveyance. Endure heat, cold, altitude, water and be able to physically confront an aggressor sans weapons.

Just thought I might add that to the list...


You are dead on MM.

I can run a mile without getting too winded (ok for a guy who is 49, I think). But if I get stung by a bee, I'm dead in two minutes unless I can reach my shot kit and even then it's gonna be iffy; might have a stroke from the shot.

I've learned everything I can about bee behavior, both the gentle Italian and New World honey bees, and the africanized ones, but I guess everyone has their Achilles heel, huh?

Looking forward to Semperfortis's exposition.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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This is something I've been attempting to prepare, because not matter the situation (y2k, 2012, economic collapse, etc) you should be prepared for yourself and your family.

1. Your Bag (
2. Vehicles (i've put alot of thought into this and i would think so type of easily sustainable 4x4 would be perfect, vegetable oil conversion. if the gas pumps stop working you can still get a supply of fuel from restaurants)
3. Weapons (Knives and Guns) (i would think something you could hunt with from squirrels to deer)
4. Basic Skills (hunting/cooking, building shelter, mechanical inclination, etc)

--- not sure on the rest
5. Practice
6. Areas to go to practice (Fun time)
7. Medicines and Natural cures, herbs, plants etc
8. Food (Gathering, storing, preparing etc)

Im still working through idea, but i'm excited to see where this thread goes.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 05:44 PM
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Sounds good. I can't wait to see what you've got coming. It is going to take me most of 2011 to be as prepared as I want to be, but after that I will be 100% off the grid.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 05:53 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 

Another issue would be the survival of those that can't leave their urban dwelling due to age, illness, etc.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by sonofliberty1776
Sounds good. I can't wait to see what you've got coming. It is going to take me most of 2011 to be as prepared as I want to be, but after that I will be 100% off the grid.


What did you do to start getting off the gird? It such a big step to go from fully dependent to 100% off the grid?



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by labouton
reply to post by semperfortis
 

Another issue would be the survival of those that can't leave their urban dwelling due to age, illness, etc.



sorry but your chances of survival are nothing - if it's so bad that people are living in the hills after each house has been pillaged it will likely be burned to the ground. your best bet is partnering with someone who can get you mobile in that instance.

Physical fitness and a reference guide are 1 and 2 - preferably one that has durable waterproof pages.
edit on 27-12-2010 by circuitsports because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 07:26 PM
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I am curious about, of all things, perhaps digging my own shelter. I have a good brick home on nearly an acre of land with recently planted fruit trees for later canning and preserving. I need to find out what I can do to make a sort of root cellar with extra room for myself and my son if push came to shove. Any ideas?



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 07:54 PM
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Would this information benefit someone with a family of 9 members, mostly little kids in early elementary school?
I can't make my 3 younger brothers and sisters learn how to survive with me, their morals are still developing(as in, not there at all) and they'd definitely make some bad choices in dangerous situations.
Also, we live about 15 minutes away from a very major city. How can I take advantage of this if I were even able to walk out on my family at all?



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 08:17 PM
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One thing we know for certain - one thing that never changes - is that everything eventually changes. There is no such thing as steady-state existence.

Based on that, we know that our current state of existence will not continue as formed.

Anyone who's spent time outdoors can tell from humidity, cloud changes, temperature changes, wind changes, and other indicators when the weather is going to get bad. There are usually multiple indicators of impending change.

Regardless of your state of living, whether city, suburban, or rural, canny folks do some planning for the possibility of things going sideways. Whether environmental disaster, economic collapse, chemical/biological/radiation attack, or political anarchy, one should give some thought on whether they stay or go. What they'll need for either scenario.

I look forward to some of the postings here.






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