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"Online storage! We keep your files safe if you crash!" Wait! What?

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posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 04:04 PM
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Just buy a new Hard drive and copy all your data there.




posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 05:05 PM
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haha.. dont you get it? people just need others to do things for them.. probably because they always need someone to blame.. i usually feel better bout myself when i can blame someone else for my negligence.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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It might be a good idea if you thought there is a possibility that your computers might get confiscated. In which case they would take any hard drives and documents as well.

A guy I grew up with is now a cop in Dallas. They got a call from a local school. The teacher reported one of her children. He was a 7yo Muslim boy who was playing some kind of cops and robbers (shoot 'em up game) with all the other kids his age. Its obvious why she singled out that boy.

His department alerted the FBI (not sure if this is protocol). The FBI went to the home of the parents and confiscated anything that might indict them including computers, DVDs and general papers lying around.

The other day, I asked him what came of that story. He said nothing came of it but that he thought the family moved out of the state.

They also randomly confiscate lap tops at airports. Michael Rivero of whatreallyhappened.com had his confiscated. When it was returned to him, it no longer worked.
edit on 26-12-2010 by gladtobehere because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 07:39 PM
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It can be done, securely, but I would question their method.

one could make a single backup file, use 256-bit encryption to chop it into little pieces, then sprinkle the pieces across many different places, to make the file secure as hell.

p2p would work great for this. That is one of my first targets for my modified version of transmission-gtk, to allow server administrators to backup their data into the cloud and to ensure co-operative push seeing of single pieces between user groups and the cloud as a whole. The 256bit encryption is secure enough that it will take millions of years for a computer to break. The key would keep it readable only by your system. Any way they can get your key without you intentionally giving it, they would likely have root access to your server anyways.

HENCE IT IS SECURE, and not one piece of it is sent unencrypted and locked down.

Do any of you people have degrees in computer science? About the worst I could picture is a flaw with a random number generator but I honestly don't think that's an issue anymore. Even if the numbers are not so random, it's random enough to keep people out. Even 20,000 years to break into it would be a stretch, and that is on top of the time it would take to break through ssh encryption which the packets themselves go through, so eavesdropping is drastically less likely than an unlikely crack on the encryption.

If I can convince server admins and average users to do this, and can create a recovery utility one can load onto a usb thumbdrive, then that'd be just the ticket. I would trust it to backup important things (and is definitely something I am going to write in the software). Personally I think it is a great idea, I just don't think I would trust anybody in a proprietary corporate environment -- such a thing should be purely open source.

I suppose that opens the door to people messing with the network; there just simply has to be a means to perform random integrity polling.

Either way -- I wholly stand behind the idea, and I feel that if this is paired up with distributed computing of some sort, one could have the cloud act as a server, and share the processing load of server side objects and merely have site run a database service, that would suffice. There are ways to have a distributed database across geographically disparate regions, it's been done before; so this can be made. In fact if it's made right it could encapsulate all web traffic and provide greater anoniminity in the end, once the tunneling and proxying capabilities are included into the deal, it will allow complete obfuscating of source and destination by using a series of agents to relay data and requests. The distributed nature of p2p makes this possible through careful management of distribution of hosted online data housed in a virtual net-drive.

All of this stuff can be bundled in. A suitable replacement for dns could be made, using utf8 format addresses instead of typical tld arrangements. your site is a folder on the netdrive. no more dns needed, if prisonplanet.ca is taken, try prisonplanet.canada, or prisonplanet.can or prisonplanetca or prisonplanetcanada. There may be partial need for user accounts and identifying non-critical information from your peer, but the only information needed is tracking data for specific pieces. Such data shouldn't be stored and eventually making the tracker part of a function of the cloud as a whole would be perfect.

One can create a subweb that is better than the web is today. In fact, torrent traffic dominates the web at 70% of all traffic, why not make it 100% and just be done with the different protocols from the perspective of what goes between point A and point B.

In fact web searching capabilities and im should be integrated in a decentralized fashion as well. Essentially I think we need a huge open source project to get this rolling. I wouldn't bother with time sensitive packets... but the delivery of a file, or a webpage, or an email, is almost always not time sensitive, it gets there when it gets there and just the fact that it gets there soon enough is good enough. I don't care if it always takes 10 seconds to load a webpage on undernet, I only care that it is delivered reliably, and if the whole set of data is fairly large that I can get it in one shot instead of making connections for each and every single little thing. The only thing I should need to connect to a webserver for should be to get their package, and to connect with their database; that's it. It could be done easily with flash apps and just using a webserver as a backend using server side scripting.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by Riffrafter

Originally posted by davespanners
Could someone here suggest an external drive that they have found reliable and used as back up for 2 years or more.

I'm pretty desperate to find one, and I don;t know which companies to trust any more.

The last one I bought was a Fujitsu Storage bird, there not a top line company but their hard drives have an Ok reputation. It died after 6 months and when I opened up the drive inside was actually made by MDT a terrible terrible company with an even worse reputation.


edit on 26-12-2010 by davespanners because: (no reason given)


I have 2 Seagate 1TB external USB drives. Both are 2 years old and have worked flawlessly for me since I purchased them (for about $79 each which at the time was a screaming deal).

One does daily backup in the background at 7am each day. I use the second one to back up the first once a month and I keep that one in a file cabinet drawer in my office 40 miles away.

Using High-speed USB, they're fast too.

Good luck.


Thanks for the recommendation, I will look into Seagate drives



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


I have never had a WD Hard Drive die before I'd moved on to a new computer. Every Seagate Hard Drive I've ever had died within the first 18 months, while I have WD's that have seen more than five years of use. I generally have aroung 6 computers running between home an office.

My latest all have eSATA connections and I use a two slot, hot swappable eternal device from Thermaltake which allows me to use internal drives instead of the crappy external ones; makes backup a breeze. When I do backups, I do it to two 1 TB WD Black Caviars at the same time to be safe when it comes to photo's, graphics for work or important files.

As to stuff like passwords and credit card stuff, don't even keep it on your computer. Get a high quality Flash Drive for that with a pass-code and encryption. Google "IronKey". They are good for many thousands of uses and keep your private stuff private.

I'm no expert on Hard Drives but I can say that I have had terrible luck with Seagate. In fact I messed up and bought a new machine with Seagate Drives and I paid dearly. I just finished replacing it and going through the two days of tedium reinstalling all my Graphics, Office and Productivity Software. Seagate which only lasted 14 months. In contrast one WD I have I still use to store important photo's is five years old and still chugging along without issue and I have a drawer full of WD's from over the years and not one of them has ever failed.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:18 PM
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You guys may want to look into creating a RAID setup on a home server or NASbox. That way, if a drive dies, your data is still retained, just replace the dead drive.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


I have had the opposite experience. WD drives have always been a nightmare, plus their warranty sucks probably because they are made out of less reliable parts. That doesn't mean higher rpm drives won't burn out, seagate cheetahs are notorious for that; but when it comes to just plain jane reliable storage nothing has beat a seagate in my opinion. Seagate owns WD btw, they are the same company. The seagate has a 5 year warranty, the wd a 2 or 3 can't remember which. Either way the amount a manufacturer stands behind their product could be a big hint as to what's better.

I have a 2 tb external seagate which I use both usb and esata connections, works great, I couldn't be more happy with it and plan to buy a 2nd sometime in the near future.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:21 PM
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If concerned about the failure rate of external drives (My 1TB WD MyBook hasn't yet for a year, fingers crossed) invest in getting a cheap NAS with no hard drive in it, and put your preferred brand of a 3.5" hard drive in it. This NAS can then be connected to your Router or switch with an ethernet cable and you can access your files.

If you do want to go external, make sure it has its own power supply. The one that runs power off USB-only tends to fail from what I've read online.
edit on 26-12-2010 by salty_wagyu because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by v1rtu0s0
 


my asus g50vt laptop comes with two 300gb drives in a mirror setup. Personally I don't bother, I just cram data into my 2tb drive because 600 gb's fills up fast -- takes a few months but I still have to get rid of it and I like keeping it around since I went to the bother of downloading it.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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a) Most people don't back up on a regular basis and that's an issue. I can't tell you how many friends and family (and yes myself too) lost important family photos when a drive died.

b) Most forms of Raid are not backups. If a file gets corrupted, raid will replicate that corruption to the other drive. Its good to have but not the end all be all solution.

If your not doing it regularly, and often, then it doesn't count either.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by salty_wagyu
 


why NAS, don't they have wireless routers now that allow you to add usb storage? I coulda sworn I saw a wifi router somewhere that you could just plug a typical external usb drive into.

......

here it is:
stepanoff.org...

I wonder, can you plug a usb hub into that, then connect several drives to it?
edit on 26-12-2010 by stealthc because: (no reason given)


Update: I totally forgot that my dir-825 does the same thing... I guess I can slap my hard drive on it then and leave it running...cool.
edit on 26-12-2010 by stealthc because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:30 PM
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If you're really that worried about raid replicating file corruption, then you need 2 or more raid arrays, just copy the same data to them. You would need to monitor/analyze periodically. While you're at it, back the files up blu rays as well.




Originally posted by PhoenixDown
a) Most people don't back up on a regular basis and that's an issue. I can't tell you how many friends and family (and yes myself too) lost important family photos when a drive died.

b) Most forms of Raid are not backups. If a file gets corrupted, raid will replicate that corruption to the other drive. Its good to have but not the end all be all solution.

If your not doing it regularly, and often, then it doesn't count either.







posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:30 PM
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What I really want to find is an external drive case that actually has some decent level of cooling as most of the problems with the drives dying seem to stem from overheating due to bad case design.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 08:49 PM
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Nas is a nice solution.
Nas-Raid is even better.
I've been testing the following:

2 LACie 1TB- non Raid..Working great, on my 6 month period of time.
Two 2-TB ReadyNas by Netgear...These are over 1 year old.
and on of them saved my life (serverwise)...I had a failed server, which was not running any apps, just sharing files.I recovered the data, and the Ready Nas is functioning as a server while I build a new one this week.

I also have a Lacie 1TB External split into multiple volumes..Eash volume is for different types of data..Photos, documents, etc..

What I would like to do on my personal network, is to have 1 more NAS..As a monthly OFFSite storage.
But instead of Offsite, I would store it in a fireproof safe.

I do agree with Davespanner about some heat problems with some drives.
I believe these were designed for Form over Function...(they look pretty)..

I also use an HP Nas...It's kind of slow...So I just use it for images of desktop configurations.
edit on 26-12-2010 by spacedoubt because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by stealthc
 


So, we have had the opposite experience then. Probably means they are both about the same. I can only relate my experience which has included 100% of the Seagates I've had going bad for me and not one WD going bad ever.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by v1rtu0s0
 


RAID has it's drawbacks as well. They still need to be backed up. Mirroring steals speed and in my case that is important. Backing up files is no biggy anyway. People just get lazy. I have all of my computers back up automatically at 3 AM, so I never notice it. Work stuff I backup to two alternate drives as double protection.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by salty_wagyu
 


Thermaltakes device for that is self powered and hot swappable. I just keep the drives in storage when not in use. I have maybe 5 TB's of just photo's and it's way better than DVD's. Most newer computers have eSATA connections so just as fast as internal. I even found a site that sells static protection cases that look like the old VHS cases. I'm getting ready to order some and abandon the hundreds of DVD's. I've had so many DVD's go bad, I have to burn two all the time and it's a slow tedious process. Hate it in fact.



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 10:08 PM
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Haha, well the niche market is so small now, the new things are things like this.

Someone will use it, thus justifying it's existence.

It's just how things are.

I don't even store crap like bookmarks or leave gmail emails (despite having it linked to a throwaway email) - I delete everything. Stopped google tracking my web history, (sure that means bugger all irl however) but where someone see's $$$ and a dummy to provide it, they'll provide the service.

Makes me wonder how google became so big, when I used to use metacrawler back in the day - google just usurped everything else - and I guess it was with gimmicks like gmail, etc, taking over from dejanews, etc and the money grabbed, adsense, that got it bulging in popularity



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Fujitsu is who bought up IBM's "DeathStars".

Those were lovely.


Fuji's werent much better afterward.

I wouldnt put anything serious on anything but solid state drives and have 2+ copies backed up on cd/dvd.



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