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Neanderthal Killing Floor

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posted on Dec, 25 2010 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Tlove250
A whole genome sequence in the Neanderthal genome was produced and analyzed. It suggests that up to 2% of the DNA in the genome of present-day humans outside of Africa originated in Neanderthals, or Neanderthals' ancestors. I don't know, my personal opinion is that they "merged" with the then-present-day (their cousins) humans. It would explain a lot. Especially since we do see many of the physical traits displayed in some modern humans.


And it might explain the strength of men like Angus Macaskill. While he was absolutely huge, his size does not seem to explain the fact that he could lift tons with relative ease.




posted on Dec, 25 2010 @ 09:56 PM
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Originally posted by Tlove250
A whole genome sequence in the Neanderthal genome was produced and analyzed. It suggests that up to 2% of the DNA in the genome of present-day humans outside of Africa originated in Neanderthals, or Neanderthals' ancestors. I don't know, my personal opinion is that they "merged" with the then-present-day (their cousins) humans. It would explain a lot. Especially since we do see many of the physical traits displayed in some modern humans.


Up to 4%, actually.


According to a new DNA study, most humans have a little Neanderthal in them—at least 1 to 4 percent of a person's genetic makeup. The study uncovered the first solid genetic evidence that "modern" humans—or Homo sapiens—interbred with their Neanderthal neighbors, who mysteriously died out about 30,000 years ago. What's more, the Neanderthal-modern human mating apparently took place in the Middle East, shortly after modern humans had left Africa, not in Europe—as has long been suspected.
. . . .
That's no surprise to anthropologist Erik Trinkhaus, whose skeleton-based claims of Neanderthal-modern human interbreeding—previously contradicted with DNA evidence—appear to have been vindicated by the new gene study, to be published tomorrow in the journal Science.
. . . .
Trinkhaus adds that most living humans probably have much more Neanderthal DNA than the new study suggests. "One to 4 percent is truly a minimum," Trinkaus added. "But is it 10 percent? Twenty percent? I have no idea."



posted on Dec, 26 2010 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Indeed, it might.


reply to post by Kailassa
 


Thank you, maybe if they can acquire more dna we can one day really find out how much.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 01:07 PM
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Could the Neanderthals have under gone rapid evolution to adapt to the changing environment?

Some groups could have possibly changed so much in one or two thousand years, that we might not be able to recognize them as Neanderthals in later fossil discoveries.

Our study of DNA is still in its infancy. Here is some new information on the Y chromosome that suggests that DNA mutation can happen quickly.

www.clt.astate.edu...

www.timesonline.co.uk...


The Y chromosome is often seen as the rotten corner of the human genome — a place of evolutionary decline that is slowly decaying and threatening the end of man. Reports of its imminent demise, however, have been exaggerated.

Research has indicated that, far from stagnating, the male chromosome is a hotspot of evolution that is changing more quickly than any other part of humanity’s genetic code.



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 07:29 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 





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