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Camouflage that filters near infrared

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posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 01:40 AM
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Hope this isn't a duplicate. The search function just goes to a blank screen.

Anyway, there is some export control issue regarding technology of Australian camouflage being given to China. It is way nuanced. Here is the document.

Australian NIR camouflage export to China

Apparently this type of camo has been around since 1995. New to me. Does anyone know just exactly what does it accomplished. For instance, does it absorb the NIR from an illumination source? Or can it hide the wearers heat signature.




posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 01:50 AM
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I have seen camo that hides the heat signature of the wearer so that night vision, or FLIR, etc can't see them by the heat source. It worked real well when I saw it using a night vision scope. I don't like the idiea of exporting it, but when I saw it, civilians had it here in the US. I guess they could of had military ties, but I didn't have a chance to talk to them. Besides, I think China has stolen so much technology that it was bound to happen anyway.



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 01:53 AM
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Originally posted by spirit_horse
I have seen camo that hides the heat signature of the wearer so that night vision, or FLIR, etc can't see them by the heat source. It worked real well when I saw it using a night vision scope. I don't like the idiea of exporting it, but when I saw it, civilians had it here in the US. I guess they could of had military ties, but I didn't have a chance to talk to them. Besides, I think China has stolen so much technology that it was bound to happen anyway.



We owe China so much money that we give them tech. Only fair I guess?
2nd

Deebo



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 02:12 AM
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reply to post by gariac
 


lol that old stuff I'm guessing they have active camo that uses organic led that is flexible paper thin which uses pin hole cameras mounted on the back and front to display predator like camouflage like your see though and if they have a way of covering it's heat signature god help us. Here's a video about organic led www.youtube.com... check it out its pretty cool its going to be big imagine a car being covered in it instead of a paint job you could change the color of your car every day even custom design your own color scheme or decals. Remember the old projection tvs and the scroll of white cloth above the white or black board in school its like that except the clunky projection machine 5 feet away is gone with and its 1080 p lol
edit on 22-12-2010 by pcrobotwolf because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-12-2010 by pcrobotwolf because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 02:22 AM
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reply to post by spirit_horse
 


Nightvision is just light amplification. Now the NV gear does have some response in NIR, so cheap NV gear comes with a NIR light source. I think in battle conditions, the NIR light source would make you a target. NV can sense to about 1um. Most of your NV illuminators are around 820nm to 900nm, just short of 1um (1000nm). FLIR goes deeper than NIR. Thermal imaging goes as far as 10um. [Due to black body radiation, objects have "tails" that go far beyond the center wavelength they emit, so for instance a really hot item like a soldering iron can show up on cheap NV gear since it has enough energy at 1um.]

So the question here is did you use NV, NV with an NIR illuminator, or thermal imaging.



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 02:27 AM
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reply to post by pcrobotwolf
 


lol yea that stuff is cool, I remember seeing it in the G.I. Joe movie
Seriously though, I wouldn't be suprised at all if it really does exist.



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 02:42 AM
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reply to post by Time2Think
 


it was in a gi joe movie lol.
wow didn't know that



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by gariac
 


So... where can I buy this. Or should I say - can the general public buy this material at all. If so where. And I assume it's expensive. Anybody out there know?



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by this_is_who_we_are
 


As they say, "google is your friend." Of course, I don't say that anymore since google is very sloppy with your privacy. Anyway, here is a link to camo that allegedly is NIR compliant:
NIR camo

It might pay to go to your local military surplus shop and see if their stock is NIR.

If you go back to the link to the paper where I started this thread, there is a reference to a paper on the Australian defense website with the details regarding NIR camo.

NIR study

That link has an embedded space and may not survive posting. Here is the referring page:
NIR study referring page

Their study was done regarding how the camo appears in visible, the NIR band, and then out to 1.8um. The concern was how the camo would appear under TV cameras and NV. The paper is kind of funny since it looks like one guy in the photos is in his underwear in the "outback", then you got a woman in a white halter. Clearly the US DoD wouldn't approve of such silliness, but it is fine for Australia. ;-)

Nothing in the paper indicated you would be safe from thermal imaging. If I read the paper correctly, the point was not to absorb NIR as much as reflect NIR as you would expect the terrain to look. If you think about this, absorbing NIR would mean you would appear like a black figure against the background. The goal is to blend in with the background.

If you ever watched blacked out aircraft fly at low level through NV, they show up as a black object against the glow of the night sky. Even gen 2 will have this effect. That is a perfect example of not blending into the background.



posted on Dec, 24 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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This is nothing new, the technology is the main reason we have the ACU. It was heralded as the universal combat uniform, in any terrain or environment against all enemies. The main reason, though at the time mostly classified, was because of "NIR" technology.

A simple display of what this technology does is found by googling any video of combat in Iraq on youtube or similar source with men in ACU's and night vision. A similar search except one utilizing thermal optics will show the vast difference in visibility.

Here is one example of NIR technology in combat :

Special Forces in Sadr, City Iraq


Civillian testing Raytheon Thermal Imaging Camera



posted on Dec, 24 2010 @ 06:56 PM
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If you actually read the links to the papers, the technology dates back to 1995, so basically 15 year old technology. Also, if the actually read the papers, it relates to NIR illumination, not thermal. The goal was to match the natural background in the NIR spectrum. Still, the Aussies were a bit pissed at the technology transfer.

The 2nd video was interesting, though I've done hands-on thermal imaging, which is much more fun. I didn't really see the relevance to the first video. BTW, they didn't play as embedded..

Here are the links.
youtube link
youtube link
edit on 24-12-2010 by gariac because: added links to youtube



posted on Dec, 24 2010 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by gariac
If you actually read the links to the papers, the technology dates back to 1995, so basically 15 year old technology. Also, if the actually read the papers, it relates to NIR illumination, not thermal. The goal was to match the natural background in the NIR spectrum. Still, the Aussies were a bit pissed at the technology transfer.

The 2nd video was interesting, though I've done hands-on thermal imaging, which is much more fun. I didn't really see the relevance to the first video. BTW, they didn't play as embedded..


Yes, I realize that it is 15 year old technology. Which is why it is in the ACU uniform. Being retired military, I know how long it takes for things to become standardized in the military. Do you know that not all units in the military have converted to ACU pattern yet?

My point in posting the first video, is that the uniforms the soldiers are wearing are being viewed in INFRARED. There is no inherent glow in the material, proving that the technology in the fabric works. If you had read the OP yourself, you would realize that what I was trying to prove the OP point with physical evidence.



posted on Dec, 25 2010 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by pcrobotwolf
 


I think the person you are replying to is thinking of the "active camo" or whatever it was called that one of the lead females used. It was more like predator camo, making you near invisible in the spectrum we use for vision.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 01:19 PM
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I know this.

Most military bodies have they're camo garments coated in this anti infra red chemical.

The US and UK forces have it as standard and it has been around long before I joined (2005).

It's meant to reduce the amount of infra red radiation and shine on the clothing material, which obviously has its benefit when at night or when someone in a tank or other infra red seeking device is trying to find you.

They tell you at basic not to iron the camo clothing because you reduce it's effectiveness.

Not secret at all and definitly not new technology.



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