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Quake Watch 2011

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posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Ummmm....sure. Maybe this is why the recent report that experts expect another one 'soon'???




posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by MamaJ
 


You might like this perhaps

www.learninggeoscience.net...



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


That blue one at the end is odd. I can't quite make out what it is. It sounds something like a quake but it is a bit fuzzy. There is no clear P and S

I am wondering if it could be a rock fall perhaps.



Addendum:

Now I see where this seismo is it obviously cannot be tree roots sounds. I would imagine, although i don't know, that ice cracks would sound similar. We all (well most) know what ice on a pond sounds like. Could this be ice in view of the fact that there a dozen or more glaciers, and it is getting colder? Katla and the other Icelandic do this regularly. (Have small ice induced earthquakes)


edit on 1/11/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


I hereby declare that I take back anything nice I ever said about scientists.

No doubt they will add some lubricant as well. So let me see drilling Japan, drilling Campi Flegri, anywhere else?

Let's just drill holes everywhere and ventilate the planet.



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


They do not calibrate every 18 hours. Calibration normally take place when the computer is restarted. These also appear at Yellowstone and the last time I asked I was told they were telemetry errors. Somewhere out there is a graphic showing these as telemetry errors but I can't find it. Not saying that is correct, just that there is one out there.

As I understand it calibration traces are spikes with long tail-offs, but I may be wrong. Note that all these are clipped whereas you can get very much larger seismic signals.



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 

This is what I'm trying to understand, so I'm glad for any feedback.


Well, something seems to be happening every 18 hours with that seismo. I suppose it was just unlucky that it was doing whatever-it-does just when that teleseismic should have arrived and been properly detected. What I can't figure out is exactly what would cause a telemetry glitch (if that's what it is) at such a regular interval.

Any ideers?


EDIT: perhaps "calibration" is the wrong term here, really. I'd originally thought that seismographs were calibrated at quite long intervals -- say annually or at the most every three months -- but I'd revised that based on what TA had said about calibration. Perhaps this is some kind of "test" signal but not actually a calibration?

Or perhaps I've got completely confused, which is always a distinct possibility.


EDIT 2: Hmmm... Just went digging and on this page at Pit and Quarry [dot] com, they say:

The recommended interval for calibration of most measuring equipment, including seismographs, is one year. Across most of North America and many parts of Europe, regulatory authorities actually require seismographs to be calibrated on an annual basis. This requirement has been, or is being adopted, by several other countries around the world and some specific projects even require that seismographs be calibrated every three or six months.


Of course, that is referring to calibration of the whole device (and it also might relate only to task-specific units used by mining companies. I don't know.) Not sure if what TA was referring to was something different.
Mike

edit on 1/11/11 by JustMike because: added edits.



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


You crack me up!
Actually you do need a geologist, as that is not my area. I'm more enviro science. Geology is more of a hobby subject. I only did a couple of geo subjects but found myself arguing with the prof so thought I'd be better off studying this thread.

That was an excellent analysis of the Glacier Peak movements. Would you be able to put the sound file up somewhere so we can all have a chance to know what all these bumps sound like? thanks.



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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Originally posted by PuterMan
reply to post by MamaJ
 


You might like this perhaps

www.learninggeoscience.net...


Now THAT is what I'm talking about. This will be a great read and definitely be able to understand some of the specifics talked about here in this thread. Thanks a bunches!!!


As for digging in Japan....yeah, I can see where "it surely has to go into the sea" comes from. I mean...REALLY? How ignorant..not naive....ignorant. I don't know why I am surprised and I don't know why the residents there are not fleeing with their middle finger up in the air and pants down with the full moon on the rise. Just cannot believe it. (End of rant).



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by zenius
 


I will put a file up but even at 20x speed it is over half an hour and I usually listen at 10x speed - so an hour of much nothing interspersed with pops.

If it is OK I will cut out the spaces to reduce the file.

By the way folks as yet another sign of approaching senility I labelled the 'monks gong' as MEGW. It is not of course it is GPW. MEGW was on the next line when I was looking for the title.

reply to post by JustMike
 


You are probably correct Mike and they are calibration. i was just going on what I was told once a long time ago and seeing as I am obviously going senile I am probably not remembering correctly!



edit on 1/11/2011 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


To me it looks like a landslide. I checked and found a page that has a similar looking signature.

www.teara.govt.nz...



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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Hotspots along west ROF and around seem more active now



MAP 4.8 2011/11/01 22:41:59 -41.731 174.290 14.5 COOK STRAIT, NEW ZEALAND
MAP 5.0 2011/11/01 22:29:40 19.683 -109.266 9.9 REVILLA GIGEDO ISLANDS REGION
MAP 4.6 2011/11/01 22:28:47 -24.313 -67.246 204.6 SALTA, ARGENTINA
MAP 4.7 2011/11/01 22:02:14 2.551 97.151 45.9 NORTHERN SUMATRA, INDONESIA
MAP 4.3 2011/11/01 21:54:38 19.815 -109.333 10.0 REVILLA GIGEDO ISLANDS REGION
MAP 4.3 2011/11/01 21:10:45 38.881 43.581 5.0 EASTERN TURKEY
MAP 5.1 2011/11/01 17:58:34 -23.902 -69.173 79.2 ANTOFAGASTA, CHIL



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 

Hi JustMike

I remembered reading about calibration pulses at the USGS site. Here is an excerpt:

Once a day, the electronics in the seismometer sends a controlled current through the coil. The response of the magnet-spring-coil system to this test signal is sent back as a calibration pulse. These pulses can be measured at the central recording site in Menlo Park, California, to assure that each seismometer is functioning properly

The example shown doesn't look identical to the one PM was trying to decipher, but maybe different models of seismometers produce different looking pulses?
Source page



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 06:20 PM
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Anyone feel this??



Magnitude
4.8
Date-Time
Tuesday, November 01, 2011 at 22:41:58 UTC
Wednesday, November 02, 2011 at 11:41:58 AM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones
Location
41.731°S, 174.290°E
Depth
14.5 km (9.0 miles)
Region
COOK STRAIT, NEW ZEALAND
Distances
65 km (40 miles) SW (219°) from WELLINGTON, New Zealand
190 km (118 miles) SW (215°) from Palmerston North, New Zealand
220 km (137 miles) E (90°) from Westport, New Zealand
Location Uncertainty
horizontal +/- 14.3 km (8.9 miles); depth +/- 9.6 km (6.0 miles)
Parameters
NST= 26, Nph= 26, Dmin=57.9 km, Rmss=1.19 sec, Gp=126°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=5
Source
Magnitude: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Location: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Event ID
usb0006hux



earthquake.usgs.gov...



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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reply to post by ericblair4891
 


Thanks for that. So when I said it might be a rock fall that could well be right.

@Olivine: That calibration pulse is what I know of, and have seen regularly. Must try and find the other diagram.



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 07:08 PM
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I'm in Vienna,relatively close to the epicenter. Didn't feel anything...

Magnitude M 4.2
Region HUNGARY
Date time 2011-11-01 23:56:34.0 UTC
Location 47.57 N ; 17.55 E
Depth 2 km
Distances 15 km SW Gyor (pop 129,009 ; local time 00:56:34.0 2011-11-02)
23 km E Csorna (pop 10,825 ; local time 00:56:34.0 2011-11-02)
2 km N Gyorszemere (pop 2,964 ; local time 00:56:34.0 2011-11-02)



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Hey Puterman, this isn't the clearest example, but I think it is what you were looking for.

Oops, I hit reply mid typing....

Anyway, I found this site describing how to remove the calibration pulse from the data, so as to see the seismic activity around it. Maybe helpful?
edit on 11/1/2011 by Olivine because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 07:24 PM
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Originally posted by MamaJ
Anyone feel this??



Magnitude
4.8
Date-Time
Tuesday, November 01, 2011 at 22:41:58 UTC
Wednesday, November 02, 2011 at 11:41:58 AM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones
Location
41.731°S, 174.290°E
Depth
14.5 km (9.0 miles)
Region
COOK STRAIT, NEW ZEALAND
Distances
65 km (40 miles) SW (219°) from WELLINGTON, New Zealand
190 km (118 miles) SW (215°) from Palmerston North, New Zealand
220 km (137 miles) E (90°) from Westport, New Zealand



Yep 733 people did, in the Upper South Island and Lower North Island, but I wasn't one of them

Don't know why, 1 other person in the suburb where I live reported in and all the suburbs around me too.
1.67%g PGA at Ward Fire Station nearest station, 0.06464%g at Kapiti island a few km from me, so lost most of its ooommffff by the time it got here.
www.geonet.org.nz...

SNZO BHI Graph , looks like an aftershock too
edit on 1-11-2011 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 07:27 PM
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Hungary joining in....

Magnitude M 4.2
Region HUNGARY
Date time 2011-11-01 23:56:32.0 UTC
Location 47.66 N ; 17.47 E
Depth 2 km
Distances 13 km W Gyor (pop 129,009 ; local time 00:56:32.7 2011-11-02)
17 km E Csorna (pop 10,825 ; local time 00:56:32.7 2011-11-02)
5 km NW Rábapatona (pop 2,497 ; local time 00:56:32.7 2011-11-02)


Source parameters not yet reviewed by a seismologist
EMSC

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by zenius
 



Would you be able to put the sound file up somewhere so we can all have a chance to know what all these bumps sound like?


This is proving somewhat difficult as the file is full of spikes (you can see them on the seismogram). These mean that I cannot lift the amplitude of the whole file because of the limits imposed by the program, and that means that you can hardly hear anything at all.

When I listen I identify a signal, slice it out so the clicks are not limiting, and amplify it.

I have tried removing the clicks but that leaves almost nothing and if i use a filter - same effect - virtually nothing audible left. This is always problem with a clicky file whether it is music or earthquakes.

So here it is, pretty much raw with as much done to it as i can in terms of volume. It is over 7mb unzipped and even zipped it is 4.2Mb so dial-up users take note.

UW_GPW _EHZ_20111101-000000_2000sps.zip



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo
To all of you experts :
Drilling Ship to Probe Fault Zone that Caused Fukushima Quake

After being tossed about and damaged by the tsunami that devastated northeastern Japan on March 11, Japan's drilling ship the Chikyu has been given an especially fitting assignment: to drill into the fault zone and take temperature measurements near the epicentre of the magnitude-9.0 Tohoku earthquake that caused the tsunami. It will be the first time that researchers have drilled into an underwater fault soon after a quake. The aim of the exercise is to solve a decades-old mystery about the part that friction plays in such an event. This should help scientists to understand why some faults are more likely than others to cause tsunamis — in this case, one that ultimately claimed more than 23,000 lives.


Couldn't this be dangerous??
edit on 1-11-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)


Or maybe the TRUTH is that they're going to drill for samples, to verify they real cause of the Tsunami/quake...NUKES! ?

If the ship SINKS before completing its 'secret' missions, be very SUSPICIOUS, then come back and STAR me for the heads-up



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