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Quake Watch 2011

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posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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East of the Rockies, there are only four earthquakes in the USA for the past week. Two along the Mississippi. And two in Ohio. Interesting. I wonder if there will be a point at which there are no quakes showing in the east.
I think it would be the first time I've seen the map empty if this should occur. At least for this year, it has always shown activity.




posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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Originally posted by Robin Marks
East of the Rockies, there are only four earthquakes in the USA for the past week. Two along the Mississippi. And two in Ohio. Interesting. I wonder if there will be a point at which there are no quakes showing in the east.
I think it would be the first time I've seen the map empty if this should occur. At least for this year, it has always shown activity.



When it's active it is alarming and when its not....it is also alarming.



posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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yes, Seismic Region 34 is very quiet at the moment.

sorry couldn'r resist. I need something to study/resaerch each day or I'd go mad, today it's Flinn-Engdahl Regions
edit on 1-10-2011 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by muzzy
 


Neat. Thanks for that. The files in the ftp directory have all the areas defined that make up the seismic regions, and the co-ordinates for them - but it runs in Fortran so I need to put it together manually. Should not be to bad. Hopefully that will define what I should be looking at with this stress determination.



posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by muzzy
 


Did you notice however that there are only 52 seismic regions defined.

As I said above, I need to get a look at this. I may try and put it together next week some time.



posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


52 regions... ? 52 weeks... holland nr36..we had an medium EQ at week 36 !



posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


only 50 main regions (and 729 sub regions) on the usgs list and 50 on the emsc map that I could see.
You would think there would be a map somewhere of at least the 729 sub regions, or perhaps they are keeping it a trade secret
, same with emsc claim of 1713 defined region names, so where are they?.
I've been 9 pages into Google Search for "Flinn-Engdahl Regions Map" andmost of it just keeps going back to the two pages I already posted via other pages linking to them.
edit on 1-10-2011 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 03:35 AM
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reply to post by muzzy
 

Hi Muzzy,

your comments motivated me to do a search but alas, I also had no success in locating a map that shows all the sub-regions. However, during my netsnooping I did find a pdf document that might be of interest to you and other members. Entitled Summary of the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre for Sept-Dec 2008, it includes a map of the major regions at least, along with a fair amount of other material, such as details and links to many regional authorities that are members (some of which I didn't have yet myself -- including the Geological Survey Dept of Cyprus and the Iraqi Seismic Network, for example).

It also has a very detailed list of terminology and definitions of terms, some excellent graphics showing the actions of many wave form combinations through the Earth and a slew of statistical and analytical data (again with various graphics).

But although the title says it's for Sept-Dec 2008, it covers much more as it includes material from this year. Seems more like a compilation. For example, there quite an interesting report on the NZ quakes of Sept 2010 and Feb this year. One little bit of info that was totally new for me was that while those quakes were M w 7.1 and 6.2, their energy release figures were actually closer than their M w figures would suggest: the USGS calculated them with energy magnitudes of M E 7.4 and 6.7 respectively. I finds that interesting as their M W figures seem to suggest the energy release difference would be greater than that, which makes me wonder if we need to review the way we consider or calculate energy release. (P 54 of the document refers.)

You and regular quake watch members (like PuterMan et al) might know all this already but I'm not sure so I thought I'd offer the linky.

Best regards,

Mike



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 05:59 AM
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reply to post by muzzy
 


Correct, my apologies. There are 59 lines in the file and I miss-counted. The lat/lon bounds for the seismic regions comprise 4255 quads of co-ordinates which are undoubtedly what I am looking for - but as I said next week. That will take some time to put together!

I just had a look at the Fortran code and it looks as if I can probably adapt that to VB.NET and import the data into a database. After all a program is just a program - the language does not matter too much.

If nothig else it gives a clue as to how this all works.



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


good find, looks interesting, I've saved it for reading later.
"slapdown"effect at Christchurch eh? sounds like the WWF



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 12:31 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


no need to apologize.
thought maybe you might be looking at a better/different version

edit on 2-10-2011 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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A total of 50 earthquakes were felt today before 09.00hrs on El Hierro in the Canary Islands, reports the National Geographical Institute. Since the spate of tremors first struck earlier this week, the island has moved an estimated 3.5 centimetres. Most of the quakes – which now top 8,000, although the majority of which were not felt – took place in the town of Frontera at a depth of around 15 to 16 kilometres below ground. The majority are between 1.5 and 2.5 on the Richter scale, but the most intense this morning rose to 3.5. Recent reports suggest that with the increased activity below the fault line, the hitherto dormant volcanoes on the island may begin to come alive and possibly erupt.

hisz.rsoe.hu...



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by Littypoos
Most of the quakes – which now top 8,000, although the majority of which were not felt – took place in the town of Frontera at a depth of around 15 to 16 kilometres below ground.
hisz.rsoe.hu...


Well no they didn't actually, most of them have been W or SW of Frontera.
Covered comprehensively here on Volcano Watch 2011 with an animated map of 8862 of the quakes up to end of 30 Sept

rsoe

edit on 2-10-2011 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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recent update on 7+ project
all the mag 8+'s I could find (193)
MWE 314-2011

screenshot


largest quake?

9.7
Date/Time: 1827/11/16 23:0: UTC
Lat: -1.9 Long: -75.6
Location: Ecuador : Pucacuro
Magnitude: 9.7 Unk
Depth: - km
Source: Ganse and Nelson (1981, 1982), Raid and Myers (1985)

* magnitude may be overestimated

edit on 2-10-2011 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by muzzy

Great info map! Did
you happen to see a
time frame on the quakes
on the first map? Wondering
how many years between
first one and the latest.
Also what do the purple dots
represent?

edit on 2-10-2011 by crazydaisy because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-10-2011 by crazydaisy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2011 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 

I've had the data for about a year but I've got bogged down in breaking it into individual years and making sure I didn't miss any or have duplications

in answer to your question
1696 years, 11 months, 1 day from the first to the lastest
or
619,786 days from the start date to the end date

the purple orbs/markers are mag 9+ ( "great" earthquakes)

its on the list (blue bar link) but heres the 9's seperated out in date order and the times between each one
YEAR, MAG, LOCATION
------- 1700, 9, USA:Oregon/Washington[Cascadia subduction zone]
+227 - 1827, 9.7, Ecuador: Pucacuro
+125 - 1952, 9, Russia:Kamchatka coast
+5 - 1957, 9.1, USA: Andreanof Islands coast, Aleutians, Alaska
+3 - 1960, 9.5, Chile:Araucanía
+4 - 1964, 9.2, USA: Prince William Sound, Alaska
+40 - 2004, 9.1, Indonesia:Simeulue coast, Sumatra[Sumatra earthquake]
+7 - 2011, 9, Japan:Sendai coast, Honshu[Tohoku earthquake]

nothing in that


most dangerous place for mag 8's?
Japan - 25
Chile - 21
Peru - 20
Russia - 18
China - 14
USA/Alaska/Hawaii - 14
Indonesia - 11
Philippines - 8
Greece - 6
Mexico - 5
New Zealand - 5
Ecuador - 4
Tonga - 4
India - 3
Mongolia - 3
New Caledonia - 3
Solomon Is - 3
Turkey - 3
Macquarie Is - 2
Samoa - 2
Azores - 1
Bolivia - 1
Canada - 1
Colombia - 1
Dominican Republic - 1
Iran - 1
Kazakhstan - 1
Marianas - 1
Nepal - 1
Pakistan - 1
PNG - 1
Portugal - 1
Puerto Rico - 1
Switzerland - 1
Taiwan - 1
Venezuela - 1
W New Guinea - 1
edit on 2-10-2011 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by muzzy
 

Great info in this post and your previous one with the map. Most interesting and hats off to you for your quite extraordinary diligence in bringing all that together.


If we are trying to discern any patterns (if any exist!) one problem I see is that we don't yet know enough about possible "older" events in certain populated regions, along with ones that might have occurred in places that are sparsely inhabited or uninhabited. For example, from studies of sediments it's now believed that the CSZ has had something like 40 mag 8-plus quakes in the past 10,000 years, but we only know this from those geological studies and not any human historical records. Even so, it begs the question of what other long-term data might be available if similar, in depth (pun) studies were to be done elsewhere.

However, because we can't pin down specific years in such cases where "old" events are evidenced, it is still very difficult to identify any possible cause-and-effect relationships, especially between geographically distant regions.

Just a little note: from 1700 to 1827 is 127 years...not 227.
(I assume that one was a typo.)

Best regards and many thanks for presenting this research,

Mike
edit on 3/10/11 by JustMike because: O tempores, O mores, O typos!




posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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Just noting the Eastern US.
NMSZ is active.
So is the area around Quitman Arkansas.
An area where they are fracking heavily.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 

thanks, yes typo error on 1700-1827

too many numbers in my eyes



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by muzzy
 


Thanks for the additional information,
very much appreciated. I think in combining
information such as this we will as some
point in time be able to see locations
that are in line for a significant quake.
Was not surprised to see Japan at the
top of the list but was surprised to see
New Zealand so close to the top.



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