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Intel to introduce processor with remote kill switch

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posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 01:36 AM
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I am not the computer wiz guy sorth that you all seem to be, but I can see this is not a good thing. It looks like it could be too easily abused.

Just the fact that this kill switch is there, built in no less, means that the potential is there for persons other than Intel to activate it. They would do so for reasons they deem important to them which likely would have nothing to do with your security.

Are there reasons that the government might choose to shut down selected computers? I think so. Wouldn't they shut down every site affiliated with Wiki leaks if they could?

Would a bank not want to shut down the same computers secretly if they could? I think so.

I don't think there is any doubt that the Chinese government would love this feature and have no hesitation what so ever. This is like IED built into the computer that a whole host of unsavories might love to have the switch for.




posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 01:36 AM
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Originally posted by kybertech


That's right the next gen Intel Processors are going to have a hardware kill switch, trigger-able remotely.

Till now I didn't even consider that something like that would be possible.

From my understanding any backdoor would have to be implemented on the Software layer (also see the OpenBSD FBI code issue)


Kills switches have been active for a great many years, well what i should point out is that they have been implemented on sensitive computers that are NOT connected to the internet.

Interesting to see how and in which direction this thread will go.

keeping my eye on this thread :-)



posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by jamiros
Well, being in the IT business the i5 and i7 processors already have a "kill switch" in them in case of robbery. If your laptop gets stolen you call Intel and the first time the computer is connected to the internet the CPU "locks" it's self. The only way to open it is by calling Intel again and asking for a re-activation.
All this I got straight from the vendor Intel.


That is true, however if one has the ability to re structure that physical architecture then it will presume its locked but in actual fact it will be a working machine. But i guess that is for the more funded orgs who have resources equal to that of a 3rd world nation;s gdp. But again, what you mentioned is absolutely correct.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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Speaking to IT Business, Allen explained that corporate IT departments could configure Sandy Bridge-based laptops to be deactivated on demand, providing a remote 'kill-switch' that enables lost or stolen laptops to be rendered useless remotely.

While the technology is simply an enhancement of anti-theft technologies already available on some corporate Intel platforms, it's an indication that Intel may be targeting Sandy Bridge at large corporations. Sadly, however, there are currently no signs of the technology appearing at the consumer level, where it could mimick Apple's Mobile Me remote management technology on its iPhone and iPad devices.


www.bit-tech.net...

Bolding is mine


edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: broken tag


www.abovetopsecret.com...

Wow good staffing

edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 05:16 PM
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Sony spent millions on developing non-copyable CD's and proudly announced it everywhere, the morning it came out a guy used a .99 cents marker, laughed at Sony and copied the CD in less than 10 minutes... Sony got mad and spent a couple more millions and came out with DRM and thought they were safe... another guy came up cut a piece of scotch tape and bypassed DRM and said a big FU to Sony...

Now CPU locking up technology... HA!!!! this is like a dream come true for guys like me that love finding ways around security for its intellectual properties of the challenge it involves... But think about malicious people, I give it 3-6 months MAX and you'll see a new wave of attacks/fishing...

There's already trojan virii out there that mod your boot sector (MBR) and lock you out of your computer and force you to pay a certain amount to regain access to your PC via credit card and such... Can you imagine having the possibility of locking up the machine itself... GAWD had I any malicious intentions I would have a huge woody right now...

Imagine a virus that use a zero-day exploit to propagate itself, within a week even before anyone would have the time to realize what happen hundreds of thousands of machine would be shutdown... This is going to be hilarious... If anyone has shares with Intel NOW might be a good time to sell...



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 05:20 PM
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Oh screw this. I stayed with intel because their E3300 was a mere $39 and it got me to 3.8ghz, but this is beyond ridiculous. I'm going back to amd for my next and all future builds after this little bit of info. Besides, their 4 & 6 core chips are way cheaper than intel's stuff.

screw intel, ms, & apple..

linux & amd all the way baby!!



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 05:21 PM
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Sounds just like a car with On-Star.

They can remotely disable it as a prevention for "theft / carjacking."

At least that is how it is marketed.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
Oh screw this. I stayed with intel because their E3300 was a mere $39 and it got me to 3.8ghz, but this is beyond ridiculous. I'm going back to amd for my next and all future builds after this little bit of info. Besides, their 4 & 6 core chips are way cheaper than intel's stuff.

screw intel, ms, & apple..

linux & amd all the way baby!!


I second that (linux & amd all the way baby!!) plus being open source with all kernel codes easily obtainable it makes things difficult for any three letter agencies to sneak stuff in...
edit on 20-12-2010 by _R4t_ because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 


www.onstar.com...

Looks like it's more a fully fledged safety suite than a anti theft device, I can't see a mention of car disabling either.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by aivlas
 



Your car may be equipped with Stolen Vehicle Slowdown or Ignition Block capability. Your car may have Stolen Vehicle Slowdown capability that enables OnStar, in connection with Stolen Vehicle Assistance services,to slow down your car remotely to assist law enforcement in its recovery. OnStar may also slow down your car if required by law or as required to protect our rights or property or the safety of you or others. If you don't want Stolen Vehicle Slowdown capability on your car, you must contact OnStar by pressing the blue OnStar button in your car and requesting that this capability be disabled. If you choose to disable this capability, it will not be available under any circumstances and can only be re-enabled at an authorized car dealership at your expense. Your car may also have Ignition Block capability that enables OnStar, in connection with Stolen Vehicle Assistance services, to send a signal to prevent your car from starting the next time that someone attempts to start it. OnStar may also disable the ignition of your car if required by law or as required to protect our rights or property or the safety of you or others.


I know I have seen a demo of a killswitch for cars too through onstar, but as far as I know if hasn't been installed yet. Of course maybe it is installed, and they were told to keep their mouths shut about it by LEOA's.


edit on Mon, 20 Dec 2010 18:24:03 -0600 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 07:03 PM
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if they can put programs on the CPU.
what else can or have they put in the CPU?
we have duel and quad plus core CPU's.
so they can put any thing in it.
there could be a second computer run by
the CIA in your CPU.
in could look at every thing you do.
and send it to them.
and your main CPU would never know!
I bet they are already doing this.
why do you think we have to up
grade the hard ware all the time?
and they make us think they can not do this yet!



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by buddha
 


How are they forcing you to upgrade your hardware all the time?



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by aivlas
 


OnStar debuts Stolen Vehicle Slowdown service


Link


OnStar used to disable a car


Link

OnStar stops truck that was carjacked at gunpoint


Link

You were saying?

Oh and BTW your cellphone mic can be turned on remotely.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 


Thanks for the links, I only looked on the onstar site and they don't mention it anywhere, they just talk about gps positioning being used to track your car.

www.onstar.com... my bad sorry.
edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: (no reason given)


*sorry ot*


Starting 2009, General Motors began equipping about 1.7 million of new vehicles with Stolen Vehicle Slowdown, which allows OnStar to remotely slow down the stolen vehicle. An OnStar operator informs the driver inside the stolen vehicle that the car is about to stop. Brakes and steering still function.


www.arlingtoncardinal.com...
and
*forum, so pinch of salt*
www.clubhummeroffroad.com...

So it slows the car and slowly disables the features so it can be stopped in a pursuit. Sounds even more like an anti theft feature now and seeing as you need to opt in to it as soon as they stopped a car that wasn't opted in they would get screwed. Any reports of them disabling the wrong or a non opted in car?


They use the vid from one of your links as a reason to get this upgrade

f.email.onstar.com...
I like this quote



they requested that OnStar use its Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® technology to bring it to a stop. Ruiz had his Tahoe back without a scratch 16 minutes after OnStar was called, and the suspect was safely apprehended.


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edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 09:54 PM
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Back On topic, sorry for misdirect.

Actually as nefarious as the "kill switch" seems, it would require external access (internet) to activate, no?

By what other means could it be accessed? Seems like the computer's OS would need to be a willing accomplice. For example one of my PC's running Win 7 recently began freezing randomly, it required a "hot patch" from Microsoft. I suppose the inverse could activate the kill via automatic updates or virus/timestamp?

So my question would be, how would Intel "press the off button" remotely?


edit on 20-12-2010 by kinda kurious because: typos - spacing



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 

And a follow up question to yours:

Can't this all be made moot, if one were to wipe the OS and install one of the many Linux distros?

Just curious, for future reference, that is...




posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 


It's done over 3G and one mo on the how to I have to re find a quote.

www.pcmag.com...

Ok can't find the quote but the guy basically said the kill command would be set up by the sys admins, so nothing to do with intel.

reply to post by LadySkadi
 


good question, seeing as it's going to be aimed at business first I would say no.
edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: (no reason given)







This seems like a lot of work for what can be so easily bypassed by the people who would be effected by anyone trying to use this to silence them, as the many articles (the non fear mongering ones) on this suggest the thief (target) can just take out the HDD and plug it in else where.


From a security standpoint, the biggest addition Sandy Bridge will deliver will be the ability to remotely kill and restore a lost or stolen PC via 3G, Marek said. Previously, that capability, which delivers a "poison pill" that can remotely wipe the PC's hard drive, was only available via Ethernet or Wi-Fi. Now, if that laptop has a 3G connection, the PC can be protected, Marek said.


Sounds like this has always been doable just not through 3G so it's nothing new and is just a anti theft device.
edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: (no reason given)

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edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: removing an it



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by kinda kurious
Back On topic, sorry for misdirect.

Actually as nefarious as the "kill switch" seems, it would require external access (internet) to activate, no?

By what other means could it be accessed? Seems like the computer's OS would need to be a willing accomplice. For example one of my PC's running Win 7 recently began freezing randomly, it required a "hot patch" from Microsoft. I suppose the inverse could activate the kill via automatic updates or virus/timestamp?

So my question would be, how would Intel "press the off button" remotely?


edit on 20-12-2010 by kinda kurious because: typos - spacing


Virtualization. Do some search and you'll see it's basically an OS (hypervisor) that hosts another OS, similar to Win7 has XP mode or you can run Windows, Linux et al under Zen or similar if the hardware supports it. If the OS (host on processor) controls all the hardware and exposes the hardware to the next layer, the hypervisor controls the hardware and only lets the other OS do what it allows.

An Intel processor with an appropriate Intel (or certified compatible) chipset could in fact have an in-built system that Windows, MacOS or Linux even runs on- this is already possible through EFI (Extensible Firmware Interface, which is replacing the historical BIOS). This EFI based system could theoretically be final the interface between the driver and hardware and be able to monitor when a network connection is established, connect via some transport mechanism running on top of TCP/IP, ATM, etc. and be able to mask itself, adapting to firewalls for instance.... Would your external hardware firewall or router block an outgoing HTTP (normal web site traffic on port 80) connection to say intelupdate dot com? Likely not if you allow web browsing and the connection data itself could be masked as normal HTTP GET and PUT requests. You'd have to be packet sniffing at the firewall and/or gateway, and be able to decode any packets sent to determine what was being sent. IPV6 will make it even harder to block domains based on target IP address too.

And imagine you get a subscription to a free anonymous proxy... what can the proxy do with your data?

Not that I've given it much thought- I work on cell networks.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 10:28 PM
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Intel vPro technology is a set of features built into a PC's motherboard and other hardware.[1][2] Intel vPro is not the PC itself, nor is it a single set of management features (such as Intel Active Management Technology/Intel AMT) for sys-admins. Intel vPro is a combination of processor technologies, hardware enhancements, management features, and security technologies that allow remote access to the PC (including monitoring, maintenance, and management) independently of the state of the operating system (OS) or power state of the PC.[2] Intel vPro is intended to help businesses gain certain maintenance and servicing advantages, security improvements, and cost benefits in information technology (IT) areas.[2][3]


en.wikipedia.org...


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edit on 20-12-2010 by aivlas because: Wrong tags used



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 10:39 PM
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reply to post by aivlas
 


wow. I didn't go wiki the tech and turns out I was pretty much right save for the http connection stuff.



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