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Air Force to Share Its Info on Planet-Destroying Meteorites

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posted on Dec, 15 2010 @ 11:24 PM
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Ran across this story- for the first time, the Air Force is considering openly sharing it's vital intel in a systematic way.


For decades, the U.S. Department of Defense has operated classified spacecraft loaded with high-tech gear to carry out a range of reconnaissance duties. But the satellites have also spotted the high-altitude explosions of natural fireballs that routinely dive into the Earth's atmosphere, and talks are under way to offer scientists access

Source: news.yahoo.com...




This is good news for the dooms day crew“Data from NEO air-burst events observed by the U.S. Department of Defense satellites should be made available to the scientific community to allow it to improve understanding of the NEO hazards to Earth,” stated a report from the National Research Council.
This will give us enough time to go outside and view the fireworks.

The Air Force anticipates sharing a range of data on bolides, including: date, time, location and altitude of the explosion, meteorite velocity and total radiated energy of the blast. The trick, from the Air Force’s point of view, is sharing info without giving away the capabilities of its most secret satellites. The Air Force has run into a similar problem with its mysterious X-37B space plane. The X-37 is meant, in part, to boost military space awareness. But to soothe other space-faring nations, some critics say the Air Force should share the data the X-37 gathers. Scientists say a shared bolide-tracking system could be modeled on the current Space Situational Awareness Sharing Program, which uses U.S. military systems to track orbital debris, and shares that data with other government agencies, foreign countries and




posted on Dec, 15 2010 @ 11:47 PM
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Even in the light of this news I often wonder,if the big one was detected would they let us know or let us go quietly?
I'm talking "apocalyptic" size object,would they simply hide in their holes worrying about mass panic.



posted on Dec, 15 2010 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by flyingfish
Even in the light of this news I often wonder,if the big one was detected would they let us know or let us go quietly?
I'm talking "apocalyptic" size object,would they simply hide in their holes worrying about mass panic.




I would like to think the public would or will be notified, but I think its more realistic that those that are on the magic list are the only people that will be notified in advance. In order to delay chaos among the regular populace, we will all go on living normal lives until the information is leaked in which I believe is exactly how it will play out. The bunkers only hold so many and tptb and elite will not want joe schmo knocking on the door.



posted on Dec, 16 2010 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by minigunner
 


I would think that an object that large would be detected by amateur astronomers.What if there is no warning?
I don't see any one chiming the toll bell.



posted on Dec, 16 2010 @ 02:43 AM
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They just did another test of the missile defense system and it completely missed it's target and failed again.

They will have to share the data because Russia's S-300 may be the only thing capable of shoot at rocks coming in.

Also since HAARP disturbed the asteroid belt and is the cause for all these asteroids coming our way....

The US Air Force is liable to everyone on Earth should these asteroids damage anything.



posted on Dec, 16 2010 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by flyingfish
 


The title is misleading. This is about data on fireballs that have already exploded in the atmosphere and were detected by earthward-looking spy satellites, it has nothing to do with with "planet-destroying" meteoroids/asteroids (meteorites implies it's already on the ground and thus can pose no further threat). As for whether "the big one" would be disclosed, it almost certainly would be; NEO threats are a game of percentages, not absolutes, at least not until further observations are obtained. The orbital information on potential threats and new discoveries is always published so that further observations can be obtained from anyone who wants to help, even amateurs. Those observations are needed to know whether or not a rock is really on a collision course or not. In fact, one of the highest chances of an impending dangerous impact ever to be discovered was ruled out by an amateur shortly before alarm bells started being sounded up the chain of command.


Finally, thanks to clearer skies over Colorado, amateur astronomer Brian Warner was able to use a 20-inch aperture telescope to look for the asteroid. His search covered a broader area of sky than had been searched by Miles, and it covered the entire area that the asteroid should have been within to be on a collision course with Earth. The asteroid wasn't there, meaning it wasn't going to strike us after all.

www.astrobio.net...

Data on truly "incoming" space rocks was never classified, only spy satellite data of fireballs and bollides that had already hit the atmosphere and exploded. The goal was to keep our enemies from learning the lower limits of our satellites' sensitivity.
edit on 16-12-2010 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)




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