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Ten Essential OTC Medications to Stockpile

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posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:45 PM
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www.survivalblog.com...



1. Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil)
2. Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
3. Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
4. Loperamide (Imodium)
5. Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)
6. Meclizine (Bonine, Dramamine)
7. Ranitidine (Zantac)
8. Hydrocortisone cream
9. Bacitracin ointment
10. Clotrimazole (Gyne-Lotrimin)


While I keep acetaminophen in supply, it needs to be used judiciously due to the liver toxicity issues associated with it. My preference for pain relief is Naproxen (Aleve) but also use Ibuprofen.

In any case, I felt this was a good primer on things you can pick up relatively cheaply from China Mart and keep on hand.

I'd also suggest getting an iodine solution since it's an excellent antibacterial.

If you would like to stock up on antibiotics and don't want to do so via prescription, Amazon.com sells quite a few "aquatic" antibiotics that are all USP grade so shouldn't cause any more issues than something you get from a pharmacy. Whether you are willing to use the aquatic antibiotics is up to you so don't take this as advice from me but merely me pointing out a place where they can be purchased.




posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by bozzchem
 


Cool list...

If you are worried about the acetaminophen toxicity look into keeping some Acetylcysteine aka NAC as well. You can check it out on wikipedia.com

TextParacetamol (Acetaminophen) overdose Main article: Paracetamol poisoning Intravenous acetylcysteine is indicated for the treatment of paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose. When paracetamol is taken in large quantities, a minor metabolite called N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) accumulates within the body. It is normally conjugated by glutathione, but when taken in excess, the body's glutathione reserves are not sufficient to inactivate the toxic NAPQI. This metabolite is then free to react with key hepatic enzymes, therefore damaging hepatocytes. This may lead to severe liver damage and even death by fulminant liver failure. For this indication, acetylcysteine acts to augment the glutathione reserves in the body and, together with glutathione, directly bind to toxic metabolites. These actions serve to protect hepatocytes in the liver from NAPQI toxicity. Although both IV and oral acetylcysteine are equally effective for this indication, oral administration is poorly tolerated, owing to the high doses required (due to low oral bioavailability,[4]) very unpleasant taste and odour, and adverse effects (particularly nausea and vomiting). Studies conducted by Baker and Dilger[5] suggest that the prior pharmacokinetic studies of N-acetylcysteine did not include Acetylation as a reason for the low bioavailability of N-acetylcysteine. In the research conducted by Baker,[5] it was concluded that oral N-acetylcysteine was identical in bioavailability to Cysteine precursors. (However, 3% to 6% of people given intravenous acetylcysteine show a severe, anaphylaxis-like allergic reaction, which may include extreme breathing difficulty (due to bronchospasm), a decrease in blood pressure, rash, angioedema, and sometimes also nausea and vomiting.[6] Repeated overdoses will cause the allergic reaction to progressively worsen.) Several studies have found this anaphylaxis-like reaction to occur more often in people given IV acetylcysteine despite serum levels of paracetamol not high enough to be considered toxic


I am assuming you have reasons why you need these exact medications, they are useful, but yet some are harmful.

There are plenty more that can be added to this list, but your list was useful. I use Benadryl for insomnia and allergies sometimes.

edit on 14-12-2010 by Corruption Exposed because: punctuation



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:58 PM
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Yours is a very good list. I would also add a big bottle of colloidal silver. Many bacteria cannot live in the presence of silver, even staph, so buy the strongest concentration you can find, usually 500ppm.

My family has long used colloidal silver to great effect. For those of you who don't believe in it, try this little experiment: You know how a cat scratch, within minutes, will swell and be red and painful? Immediately after the cat scratch, apply colloidal silver, and you'll have no redness, swelling, or pain. Not even triple antibiotic cream will do that. CS also works like gangbusters on ear infections, usually in just one application, so it's a fantastic thing to have around if you or your kids are prone to these. I swear by it.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:58 PM
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I'd rather stay all natural. I honestly haven't taken a single OTC pain killer in over a decade. No need. My body tells me when something is wrong and I deal with it accordingly. As for antiseptics, antibacterials and the like, I choose to use herbs and essential oils. To each their own.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:59 PM
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I wonder who put that top ten list together, seriously? I have never reached for anything on that list, and off the top of my head I can think of a few which are vital, and missing. No mention of aspirin...? Hydrogen peroxide?



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by starless and bible black
 


I think it a very good list, with your addition of aspirin. Aspirin is good to have for all sorts of ailments, including it's blood thinner properties. I think that all of the meds listed are a good cross-section of meds to have on hand.

I have stockpiled everything on the list, and am working on adding a few herbals now. Also consider adding things like guifenasin (mucinex and mucinex dm) for those who may contract a chest cold. I have also added alka-seltzer cold med, a cold & allergy combo (pseudoephedrine & chlorpheneramine) and vicks vaporub.Combating a severe cold with no meds is dangerous for the very young and the elderly. You need to treat the symptoms before they develop into pneumonia.

I have ordered several antibiotic salves and treatments from the veterinary meds section on amazon. They are exactly like the human perparations without the doc visits and cost.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by starless and bible black
I wonder who put that top ten list together, seriously? I have never reached for anything on that list, and off the top of my head I can think of a few which are vital, and missing. No mention of aspirin...? Hydrogen peroxide?


I gather you didn't click the link I provided? The list is not mine but was one put together by an MD. Why bother commenting if you haven't taken the time to at least read the link?

I think her list is a start but my personal list also includes colloidal silver, a nebulizer, peroxide, and household bleach just for starters.

The list wasn't meant to be all inclusive but was meant to be a starting point.

I think one of the most important items on the list is Imodium. If you get the squirts and are already in a situation where you don't have access to the amount of potable water required to maintain hydration...you're dead.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


VERY interesting link and my thanks for adding it. In my mind, rather than needing something to combat toxicity of another substance, take as little of the toxic substance as needed and it shouldn't be an issue.

From my recollection, toothaches are one of the biggest causes of acetaminophen overdose. It would certainly be handy to have something on hand to combat the potential toxicity and I thank you again for providing me with the information.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 


I agree with you but feel there are times when the all natural route is only as good as your herbal supply on hand.

If you were to break a bone and not have an herbal pain killer handy, 4 Ibuprofen tabs would certainly be something you were glad to have around...and they're cheap.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by starless and bible black
I wonder who put that top ten list together, seriously? I have never reached for anything on that list, and off the top of my head I can think of a few which are vital, and missing. No mention of aspirin...? Hydrogen peroxide?


Nursing student here and chiming in about hydrogen peroxide, it breaks down into water and oxygen on contact with the skin so it's a waste as far as wound cleaning is concerned (contact with an enzyme in the skin causes it to break down, the bubbling is the release of oxygen and what is left over is water). It's only good for disinfecting nonliving tissue. Sorry, I know everyone has it in their medicine cabinets, as I used to, but it doesn't work on skin.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
I'd rather stay all natural. I honestly haven't taken a single OTC pain killer in over a decade. No need. My body tells me when something is wrong and I deal with it accordingly. As for antiseptics, antibacterials and the like, I choose to use herbs and essential oils. To each their own.



same...I stock tea tree oil, paw paw ointment, bicarb, mineral salts, camomile lotion, citronella oil, grapeseed, arnica and cloves...treats about everything we come across..for heavy injury we have a good army med kit..but for daily use and bites cuts, bruises and bugs..this lot seems to get us by just fine..no creepies...and most of them can be sourced through my own garden or in whats left of nature locally to me..so if the stores shut up shop..Id still be able to get a reasonable term supply of them on the qt.




edit on 14-12-2010 by Rosha because: spelling! again:/



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by justsaying
 


I'm going to chime in as well regarding hydrogen peroxide. Your assessment is spot on regarding how it breaks down. Keep in mind you have to discuss the concentration of your H2O2. I believe the standard concentration sold is roughly 3 or 4%. Get your hands on some 30%, place a drop on your skin and be prepared for what happens.

The drugstore stuff is good as a gargle/rinse and must be kept in a dark container since the degradation you described is accelerated by sunlight.

Get your hands on a higher H2O2 concentration and you'd damn well better wear gloves and safety glasses when handling it. It's a very powerful oxidizer and burns like hell once it touches your skin.

I'm not arguing with you but am just trying to put things into perspective.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 05:55 PM
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Aspirin- best and cheapest all around anti-inflammatory and analgesic (OTC).

Tea tree oil- antiviral, antibiotic, antifungal

Lavendar Essential oil- analgesic, antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal

Hydrogen Peroxide-

Iodine (Betadine)-

Benadryl-

Burt's Bees Hand Salve-

Iron (picolinate) supplements-

Zinc supplements-

Vitamin C buffered powder-



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by bozzchem
reply to post by justsaying
 


I'm going to chime in as well regarding hydrogen peroxide. Your assessment is spot on regarding how it breaks down. Keep in mind you have to discuss the concentration of your H2O2. I believe the standard concentration sold is roughly 3 or 4%. Get your hands on some 30%, place a drop on your skin and be prepared for what happens.

The drugstore stuff is good as a gargle/rinse and must be kept in a dark container since the degradation you described is accelerated by sunlight.

Get your hands on a higher H2O2 concentration and you'd damn well better wear gloves and safety glasses when handling it. It's a very powerful oxidizer and burns like hell once it touches your skin.

I'm not arguing with you but am just trying to put things into perspective.


Yeah, I was talking about the standard drug store concentration, should have pointed that out. I don't know anything about the stronger concentrations you mentioned of peroxide though, at least not yet. But in gram positive tests (body surface areas hold gram positive bacteria) we have run in microbiology, iodine based antiseptics, like betadine, have tested most effective (we didn't test HP in higher concentrations). Gawd, I hate iodine, burns like hell and I used to run and hide when my dad would try to put it on a cut when I was a kid, but he trusted it with good reason. Iodine based scrubs are what what most hospitals use for surgery scrub in, just wanted to add. Sorry not trying to get off topic, just wanting to add to what else is effective.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by justsaying
Yeah, I was talking about the standard drug store concentration, should have pointed that out. I don't know anything about the stronger concentrations you mentioned of peroxide though, at least not yet. But in gram positive tests (body surface areas hold gram positive bacteria) we have run in microbiology, iodine based antiseptics, like betadine, have tested most effective (we didn't test HP in higher concentrations). Gawd, I hate iodine, burns like hell and I used to run and hide when my dad would try to put it on a cut when I was a kid, but he trusted it with good reason. Iodine based scrubs are what what most hospitals use for surgery scrub in, just wanted to add. Sorry not trying to get off topic, just wanting to add to what else is effective.


Don't sweat it. Most people aren't familiar with the stronger peroxide solutions!

Oh, check my OP and you'll see I mentioned iodine. I keep Betadine in a large bottle and think it is wonderful stuff and doesn't sting THAT bad!
What sucks more is the stain it leaves IMO.

You'll want to ask your instructor about gram negative bacteria since from my recollection they are more detrimental to your health. It's been about 17 years or so since I plated bacteria to test the viability of antiseptics but always found Betadine and common bleach to be the powerhouse killers.

Spore formers are the biggest enemy.

edit on 14-12-2010 by bozzchem because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-12-2010 by bozzchem because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 07:22 PM
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my yard and every where round here
I always have some of the main ones prepped, especially for winter
hope this is on topic BC
just chipping from the view of sustainability

asprin - willow, meadow sweet
opiates-labradore tea, lettuce ( yeah but LOTS of lettuce)
yarrow-infections (gangrene absceses/tooth ache, food poisoning, wounds, internal bleeding, constipation etc
Saint Johns Wart-anti depressant
horse radish, cedar bark-alergies congestion
garlic- anti bactrieal anti fungal
virginia creeper ROOT tonic stimulant stress recovery (way better than Viagra, and safe)

just a partial list of course, but covering the main basics

way cool link here
www.pioneerthinking.com...

not much to prepping either
a non metalic pot, though you can do more with a little kitchen chemistry

the labradore tea is also a tasty sedative tea
processed properly its a very effective opiate and it is evergreen so its there when you need it

Yarrow, its sacred to many OLD cultures for a reason
its the king of herbs IMHO

PS all for the Iodine though
its handy


edit on 14-12-2010 by Danbones because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-12-2010 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by bozzchem
 


I have cases of Diphenhydramine. Sam's Club had a special where it was $4 for 500 pills, so I bought a couple of cases. You can never have too much Benadryl!



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by bozzchem
 


A broad-spectrum antibiotic would be #1 on my list of meds to have on hand if TSHTF. Analgesics etc would be nice, but you can DIE from a minor cut if it gets infected badly enough. Or from an abcessed tooth, etc. You can get antibiotics from any vet supply place and even from your local feed store if you live in a rural area. You can even buy them online from practically any pet supply place that sells meds. And the Cephalexin or Amoxocillin you get from a pet supply place for your dog is no different than the stuff you get for yourself when your Dr. writes you a scrip---ask a vet.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 09:02 PM
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I'll add Bag Balm to that list
. Bag balm is relatively inexpensive and works wonders for a variety of things. www.mahalo.com...
edit on 14-12-2010 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by riiver
reply to post by bozzchem
 


A broad-spectrum antibiotic would be #1 on my list of meds to have on hand if TSHTF. Analgesics etc would be nice, but you can DIE from a minor cut if it gets infected badly enough. Or from an abcessed tooth, etc. You can get antibiotics from any vet supply place and even from your local feed store if you live in a rural area. You can even buy them online from practically any pet supply place that sells meds. And the Cephalexin or Amoxocillin you get from a pet supply place for your dog is no different than the stuff you get for yourself when your Dr. writes you a scrip---ask a vet.



Check my OP where I mentioned getting antibiotics from amazon. I have no shortage of any of what you've described.

Nobody will have an infection that can't be treated on my watch. Rest assured of that.



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