It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The 80/20 "Rule" As A Basis of Individual Life Philosophy

page: 2
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 08:19 PM
link   
reply to post by sonjah1
 


That makes sense but if you look at it from a different angle. If a store has a distruibitor that offers 100 items and the store stocks 20 of these items they will please 80% of their customers with their offerings. When you try to please everyone that is when you run into trouble.

A good example of this is a show with Chef Gordon Ramsay. He tries to help failing restaurants. One of the things that often come up in that show is that the menu is too big so they end up trimming it down. Don't try to please 100% of the people because it's impossible.




posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 08:22 PM
link   
reply to post by daskakik
 


Yes, I guess that is what I was trying to say on a larger scale, but you said it better than me



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 08:33 PM
link   
reply to post by sonjah1
 


Right because what I understood from your previous post is that there is an inverted version of the rule. Like put in 80% of the effort to get 20% of the results but the rule doesn't work like that. It is more like 20% effort gets 80% result, 40% effort gets 90% result, 80% effort gets 95% results so that the closer you get to perfection the harder it is improve.

You don't have to settle for 80/20 but you should think about how much you are investing in comparison to what you are getting back to find the spot that your comfortable/happy with.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 08:56 PM
link   
Expectation is inversely proportionate to serenity. Thus, it's best not to go into any activity or endeavour with any expectation for the reward, simply surrendering the fruits of the activity or of work performed, allowing every increase to come as a pleasant surprise and every decrease, as a pointer. Then in all we do, there is vitality, and peace.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 08:57 PM
link   
reply to post by daskakik
 


So...has there ever been an area in your life where the situation becomes 50/50 so you decide to bail?



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 09:38 PM
link   
reply to post by sonjah1
 


To be honest I would say that there have been times when it has been worse than 50/50 and I have kept at it. Businesses tend to be that way because you have mix of hope and pride that keeps you going. Hoping things take a turn for the better and not wanting to face failure.

I think a better question would be if the rule could be applied to any situation? I would say no. I tend to use it in simple situations. The one thing that I think is important is to know what the maximum is. In other words what is 100%. For example, lets say there is a market in your area for a service. This market is a $1000 a week market. No amount of promotion will get you $2000 a week because $1000 is 100%.

Now you can work at creating a greater demand but I would say that this would be another activity which would deserve it own 80/20 allotment.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 09:44 PM
link   
reply to post by daskakik
 


Good advice on business; now what about other aspects of life: hobbies, relationships, and such?



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 10:26 PM
link   
reply to post by sonjah1
 


I think that it can be applied to any situation if it's simple enough.

At firt glance it may seem like it would not apply to relationships because they are to complex but I think that if you start to think about it most relationships go bad because people take them for granted and don't even invest the 20% effort.

I think NewAgeMan makes a good point about going into things calculating what we are getting in return. I think that the best use for the 80/20 rule is that it helps us to stop obsessing on perfecting a single aspect of our lives and invest all that extra effort on other aspects of our lives that we may have been neglecting.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 10:29 PM
link   
reply to post by daskakik
 


Yeah, I think the 80/20 rule is workable, until you get past 40, and then you'll find that it will begin to erode over time, at which point you can then evoke the inverse law of serentiy/expectation and begin to renunciate, and enjoy.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 10:47 PM
link   
reply to post by daskakik
 



At firt glance it may seem like it would not apply to relationships because they are to complex but I think that if you start to think about it most relationships go bad because people take them for granted and don't even invest the 20% effort.


Yikes! ^^^

My terms of thinking are if the relationship is satisfactory to both parties at least 80% of the time, then they shouldn't go *bad*



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 10:50 PM
link   
reply to post by NewAgeMan
 


Yeah, I think the 80/20 rule is workable, until you get past 40, and then you'll find that it will begin to erode over time, at which point you can then evoke the inverse law of serentiy/expectation and begin to renunciate, and enjoy.


^^ Mr. Newageman: When you get the chance, please enlighten me in dumb blonde terms what you are talking about.

Thanks. xo



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 11:06 PM
link   
reply to post by sonjah1
 


I agree so if things in a relationship go wrong chances are one or both people made almost no effort. Could be because they focused on their job, keeping up with the Joneses, hanging with their friends/going out, maybe even being the perfect parent. That's right invest your time on your job/children/friends/hobbies but remember you have a partner that you have to invest some time with. Settle for being a good worker/parent/friend/ so that you can also be a good husband or wife.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 11:30 PM
link   
reply to post by sonjah1
 


You aren't married are you?

Interpersonal relationships are in such a state of flux and chaos that it's impossible to quantify them.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 12:27 AM
link   
reply to post by whaaa
 


Oh, but I am.


However, I am married to a Mechanical Engineer with a MBA/CPA so you can see where all that is derived from!


Joking aside though, you can't expect a spouse to be a 100% ALL of the time. If you are satisfied 80% of the time, then I think you're doing pretty well, don't you?
edit on 14-12-2010 by sonjah1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 12:41 AM
link   
It's been my experience that nothing is perfect. Perfection in fact could be boring. If everything was perfect, there would be no room for improvement.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 12:54 AM
link   
reply to post by Skid Mark
 


So true, Mark. But our American culture emphasizes perfection--or at least it seemed to me when I was growing up--you have to look like Barbie, cook like Julia Child?, have a "profession," and be a Dr. Spock on child-raising. I know it's fake, but it's popular....it's out there...



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 01:47 AM
link   
I wonder sometimes if that's the reason a lot of people are depressed. Or nuts. The world just doesn't live up to their expectations.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 01:54 AM
link   
reply to post by sonjah1
 

I can't. Not on those terms.

It's not the kind of thing one could share in such a manner as that.

The answer however IS available, and it's contained in the Bhagavad Gita, and in the actions and philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi, for whom the Gita was his guidebook, all the way along.

Seek and you will find. Knock and the door will be opened to you.
xoxo



new topics

top topics



 
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join