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Extreme & Unusual Weather Thread

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posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


Do you know what weather patterns have changed which may have contributed to the change in weather?

We can blame TPTB and chemtrails, we can say it's a natural cycle, we can say the planet is fighting back or some may say it's the sun or the solar system.
BUT whatever is causing the perceived changes in the weather, the more we monitor them and discuss them and the more we look at what's changed and how, the better picture we will get and the better prepared we will be.




posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by Nebulous73
 

Relative humidity is the most well known as it's the type used in weather forecasting. This is because it is the measurement most indicative of the likelihood of fogs forming or precipitation (rain, sleet, snow) falling. Relative humidity is a comparison of actual water vapor content in the air against the maximum possible, the saturation vapor pressure of water for the current air temperature; the higher the temperature, the higher the possible maximum. In other words, the warmer the air, the more water vapour it can hold.

Do you experience temperature inversions where you live?


What do the local weather experts say about it? I'd be most interested to hear their take on those conditions.
See what you can find out.
edit on 13-12-2010 by zenius because: extra info



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by zenius
 


Zenius ,I have been noticing a distinct lack of lightning in storms that have passed in the area near your av pic,I look forward to big electrical storms but they seem to be lacking any charge lately. Might just be in my area but wondering if others have noticed this.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by 12voltz
 


I am in Ohio an we are having extreme cold weather already for this time of year. Already 5 degrees and below 0 degrees windchills. We do not usually see this until January at least. What is going on with the weather? I hate cold weather and know I can not take 3 or 4 months of this. It should be in the 30`s this time of year.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 06:27 PM
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For the record, this is the worst start to a winter I've ever seen, and I've seen a few! 1984 was the record to go by, but I'll tall ya, I've been in my present town for six years now and it's worse. Way worse. We have had six feet of drifts after the first storm, and blizzard conditions all but two days since. It's that bad. We're getting another foot of snow tonight too ... I wonder about the ice age, and if it's here already. Things are that dramatic. Thanks for listening, I wanted to vent that somewhere on ATS, and yours was the thread!



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 06:34 PM
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Originally posted by zenius
reply to post by snowspirit
 


Do you know what weather patterns have changed which may have contributed to the change in weather?

We can blame TPTB and chemtrails, we can say it's a natural cycle, we can say the planet is fighting back or some may say it's the sun or the solar system.
BUT whatever is causing the perceived changes in the weather, the more we monitor them and discuss them and the more we look at what's changed and how, the better picture we will get and the better prepared we will be.


No idea. Just going by what I've heard the farmers say. It sounds like it's cyclical, and they move the crops around as to what grows best, and where. I think a couple of different types of cycles might be to blame, even the earth's precession, or orbital inclination.

en.wikipedia.org...
It's a good read. Both enlightening and confusing.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 06:40 PM
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reply to post by Northwarden
 


I know I was starting to wonder about the weather. I can`t find anything on the North Atlantic Current. From what I understand if it shuts down North America will have exactly the same weather we are having now and so will Europe. I don`t ever remember it getting this cold so early on.
If anybody has any info on this I would appreciate it or any other insight as to what is going on.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by Northwarden
For the record, this is the worst start to a winter I've ever seen, and I've seen a few! 1984 was the record to go by, but I'll tall ya, I've been in my present town for six years now and it's worse. Way worse. We have had six feet of drifts after the first storm, and blizzard conditions all but two days since. It's that bad. We're getting another foot of snow tonight too ... I wonder about the ice age, and if it's here already. Things are that dramatic. Thanks for listening, I wanted to vent that somewhere on ATS, and yours was the thread!


Here is Sask we had one night dip down from -20 to -35, and back up to normal (-15) in just 2 days.

I heard on the news the other day, that some Ontarions were getting about 10 feet of snow, by the time the system moves through
That kind of snow 'll trap you in your house if you can't climb out a second story window!! If I even get a foot overnight, I can't get my back door open, because the screen door won't push out


And winter's barely even here yet. Let's hope it stays cold now. You don't want to see the snow melt fast when there's many feet of it like you guy ended up with.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 07:22 PM
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Originally posted by Nebulous73
reply to post by zenius
 


Northern New Jersey..last 2 days have been above 50 degrees with rain..for this time of year it should not be 50 degrees..I live in northern new jersey literally across from a well known ski resort,they have been blowing snow for a week.the temps were cold..this latest storm that dumped a ton of snow not far west from here has been all rain..kinda muggy too..unusually warm for this time of year.


Hey Jersey,
Yeah, I saw that on the weather map last night. I'm in SC and we should have YOUR temp and you should have OURS (at least that's the way it's been since I can recall.) It did not get above freezing today, wind gusts 10 - 20 mph, and was already down to 28 degrees by 4:30pm today. Not sure what it is now, but the dang wind makes it feel, well, not like a SC mid-December! Trade-ya, Nebulous73!



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


Lol I collected 189$ in snow-shovelling so far, and I'm slated for 7:45 tomorrow morning for another four hours. It's White Gold, with a little removal in between! But that says nothing for the cross-section of town you have to work with. So I went and applied for a restaurant job. With 3000 hours in the kitchen, I managed it spot on the interview, and I am thankful. It's Saute for me, next few months & on. Let it snow, and may those with the stamina find a good living at it. I peeled logs for four years recent, and that's a task, but it doesn't compare to blizzards, (some) lousy crew-men, and no lunch break over 9-hour shifts for a crappy place in your world. Plows can't get the front porches, and power to you shovellers, for your work is helpful.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 03:37 AM
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reply to post by 12voltz
 


So far this year the storms have been less than average here. I'm not sure where you are, but if it's NT, then I remember the lightning show used to be spectacular 20 years ago in that area.
The last storm we had here there were a few direct hits close by, but it was short lived.
I have noticed unusual cloud formations over the last few months and even spiralling storm clouds which I've not noticed before.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 04:11 AM
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Thank you to all in Canada and the US for your input. I know nothing of northern hemispheric weather patterns and I am learning more each day as read about what you are dealing with at the moment. While trying to understand your current weather I came across something call the "Lake Effect" which I hadn't heard of.

Lake-effect snow is produced in cooler atmospheric conditions when cold winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, providing energy and picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on the leeward shores. The same effect over bodies of salt water is called ocean effect snow, sea effect snow, or even bay effect snow. The effect is enhanced when the moving air mass is uplifted by the orographic effect of higher elevations on the downwind shores. This uplifting can produce narrow but very intense bands of precipitation, which deposit at a rate of many inches of snow each hour, often resulting in copious snowfall totals.
SOURCE

Regarding Ontario & Ohio :

The coldest air of the season so far has unleashed a new, nasty lake effect event and can leave some downwind areas thigh deep in windblown snow all over again. During Monday, streamers of snow were clobbering northwestern Indiana and northeastern Ohio with heavy snow, low visibility and road closures.


Lake-effect snow may continue off lakes Huron, Erie and Ontario through the day Wednesday.


SOURCE



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 04:17 AM
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Records have been broken with the recent snow storms too:

The 17.1 inches that fell in Minneapolis from Dec. 10-11 set the all-time record for two-day snowfall in December.


daily snowfall records were set all across the Midwest. Other major cities where records were set include Detroit with 6.3 inches, Indianapolis with 4.1 inches and St. Louis with 4.4 inches. In each of these cities, this was the highest daily snowfall on Dec. 12 in more than 100 years. The previous records were 4.0 inches for Detroit in 1893, 3.5 inches for Indianapolis in 1898 and 2.5 inches for St. Louis in 1903. Other record daily snowfall totals in the Midwest include: -Marquette, Mich.: 12.3 inches -Lansing, Mich.: 5.2 inches -Flint, Mich.: 5.5 inches -Lansing, Mich.: 5.2 inches -Columbus, Ohio: 2.9 inches -Lincoln, Ill.: 2.3 inches


A trace of snow set records in Anniston and Tuscaloosa, Ala., Jackson, Tenn., and Jonesboro, Ark. In the mountains of North Carolina, snow amounts ranged from a couple of inches to almost a foot and a half. The 2.8 inches that fell in Asheville, N.C., broke a longstanding record from 1917.
SOURCE



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 04:21 AM
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Originally posted by Iamherefornow
reply to post by Northwarden
 


I know I was starting to wonder about the weather. I can`t find anything on the North Atlantic Current. From what I understand if it shuts down North America will have exactly the same weather we are having now and so will Europe. I don`t ever remember it getting this cold so early on.
If anybody has any info on this I would appreciate it or any other insight as to what is going on.


It may be worthwhile reading my thread on the current Gulf Stream misinformation found here.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 04:33 AM
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Meanwhile, in other areas of the world:
Lebanon has gone from having warm conditions and forest fires one week to sudden snow this week and a month's rainfall in 3 days Link< br />

Syria has gone from drought to the first snow fall in 2 years Link

At least 10 people dead and the Panama Canal had to be closed due to recent heavy rainfall and historic levels of rivers and reservoirs Link< br />
edit on 14-12-2010 by zenius because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 05:28 AM
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reply to post by jrmcleod
 


There is plenty of research to suggest the gulf steam was different during ice ages, but whether a participating cause or effect of the ice age no one can really know.

But yes, many factors come into play when modelling the weather which we hope to address in determining these extreme and unusual weather events.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 05:55 AM
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Element which affect weather are: temperature, pressure, moisture content, speed and direction in which its moves.

* One factor is that the sun does not heat all parts of the earth equally; the resulting difference in density and pressure causes the air to move from different places.
* Another factor is the different physical features (mountains, plains, bodies of water) have different effects on the atmosphere.
* The season and the time of day also affect the state of the atmosphere.
* The gravitational pull of the moon, which varies with its position

Climate is affected by: distance to seas/oceans, ocean currents, latitude or proximity to the equator, direction of prevailing or trade winds, El Nino/La Nina phenomenon, geography and arguably human influence.

The difference between weather and climate is weather describes the variations which occur in the atmosphere on a daily basis, whereas climate is a measure of the typical weather found at a place.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 06:03 AM
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Well being someone who works for the Australian Weather Bureau i can say that your claim of our lack of cyclones so far this seaseon is both misleading and seems to be an assumption.

Typically we get most our cyclones between February an April. The cyclone season runs from mid november to early may..and its only a month or so in. Generally, they dont start appearing til late December, so the fact we havent had any so far is NOT unusual.

Get your facts right first



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 06:10 AM
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Ok, another theory on why the northern hemisphere is experiencing such cold conditions.
The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull.
There is a history of similar occurrences:
* Toba catastrophe 70,000 to 75,000 years ago.
* The Hekla 3 eruption of about 1200 BC, contemporary with the historical bronze age collapse.
* The 1628–26 BC climate disturbances, usually attributed to the Minoan eruption of Santorini.
* Climate changes of 535–536 have been linked to the effects of a volcanic eruption, possibly at Krakatoa.
* An eruption of Kuwae, a Pacific volcano, has been implicated in events surrounding the Fall of Constantinople in 1453.
* An eruption of Huaynaputina, in Peru, caused 1601 to be the coldest year in the Northern Hemisphere for six centuries (see Russian famine of 1601–1603).
* An eruption of Laki, in Iceland, caused major fatalities in Europe, 1783–84.
* The eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 led to odd weather patterns and temporary cooling in the United States, particularly in the Midwest and parts of the Northeast. An unusually mild winter and warm, early spring were followed by an unusually cool, wet summer in 1992.
Link



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 06:22 AM
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reply to post by OzWeatherman
 


WooHoo, Oz is here. So glad you could join in. Was going to U2U you to get you here.

Yes, that is right about cyclone season and when most of them occur. No it's not an assumption. But I remember Phoebe was in September, Anika was in November, and I think there was a Melanie or Melody early in a season too. Maybe my memory is not as functional as it used to be. But I should have been clearer, I didn't mean less cyclones as such, but less favourable conditions for cyclones to form. Being in Qld, I remember quite a few early seasonal promising lows forming but not developing. With the strong La Nina I thought we'd have more favourable activity and a more active monsoon trough by now.

What's your take on what's happening in the northern half of the world?
edit on 14-12-2010 by zenius because: misspellllinng

edit on 14-12-2010 by zenius because: (no reason given)



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