Plantlife on Titan

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posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:08 AM
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Well, at least NASA doesn't seem to rule out the possibilty.

(If this link has been posted before I'm sorry -- I just haven't got the time to keep updated on all the subjects
)


saturn.jpl.nasa.gov.../multimedia/images/titan/images/PIA06404.jpg&type=image




posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:25 AM
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But then again, I guess organics could been simpler things then plants, like bacteria. But even so, there's still a possibility for extra-terrestrial life in our solar system, even if Europa in my opinion still is the strongest candidate.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:33 AM
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If they find life on Titan and Europa and past life on Mars that would be good evidence that life is going to be just about anywhere we look in the universe. I think Europa is the best bet though too



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:37 AM
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I dunno... how much sunlight does it get though, for photosynthesis? we need to consider that.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:43 AM
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Is photosynthesis really necessary? I remember hearing some Marine-Biologists discovered whole new ecosystems where there should theoretically be none. I think it was some deep under-sea vent where no sunlight get through and oxygen is very scares as well...yet they found life. What is the ambient temp of Titan by the way? Do we actually know what it's exact atmospheric composition is yet?



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by browha
I dunno... how much sunlight does it get though, for photosynthesis? we need to consider that.


Well, I'm not sure. However sunlight aren't the only factors. I believe the amount of carbon dioxide and the surrounding temperature is also vital factors for photosynthesis. But then again, I believe life adjust to its surroundings, so that in hostile surroundings it becomes more specialised in order to survive -- perhaps a more effective form of photsynthesis (If that is possible).



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:49 AM
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Your right sardion2000 the life they found on the deep sea vents like the tube worms dont use the sun at all. They are under pressure that would crush most life forms very toxic water and in temps that would boil most animals too. Its funny to see a shrimp that is in water much hotter than boiling water Imagine trying to cook that guy he prob want you to turn up the heat in the pot.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:54 AM
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Ah, that's true, I'd completely forgotten about those..
Thanks for reminding me!

I for one certainly hope there is life under Europa's seas.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 05:56 AM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Is photosynthesis really necessary? I remember hearing some Marine-Biologists discovered whole new ecosystems where there should theoretically be none. I think it was some deep under-sea vent where no sunlight get through and oxygen is very scares as well...


Yup, this is exactly why i believe the biggest chance of finding extra-terrestrial life is in the vast ocean underneath the ice-cap covering Europa. The moon has a lot of volcanic activity, and in combination with water this could create good conditions for life.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 06:00 AM
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Speaking of extra-terrestrial life... has anyone read Meeting with Medusa - a short story by Arthur C. Clarke - where they discover life in the atmospheric layers of Jupiter? If not I would recommend it.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 06:03 AM
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Hmm sounds interesting
speaking of books, has anyone read noughts and crosses? that's a good book =p off topic though.
I think the plausibilty of finding life on jupiter is really low, because of the gravity.. you'd need to be built out of titanium to prevent being crushed =p



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 06:03 AM
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I think landing a probe that can get through the ice on europa should be at the top of nasas list of things to do. You have a ocean larger than all of earths oceans that has been around for longer. And look what earths oceans did in a couple of billion years. I say forget about finding some fossil on mars of some long dead creature and focus on were living lifeforms could be



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by ShadowXIX
I think landing a probe that can get through the ice on europa should be at the top of nasas list of things to do. You have a ocean larger than all of earths oceans that has been around for longer. And look what earths oceans did in a couple of billion years. I say forget about finding some fossil on mars of some long dead creature and focus on were living lifeforms could be


It's on their list though, if not exactly on top. I agree with you 100 %. Put all the money and effort in the Europa basket and push the start button.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 07:23 AM
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Life on titan if its there would be the biggest scientific discovery of the century.

But heres an idea if we could create a machine that could cut out enormous chunks of water out of europa then ship them off to mars wouldnt it be a good way to terraform?

[edit on 4-7-2004 by Vegemite]



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by Vegemite
Life on titan if its there would be the biggest scientific discovery of the century.

But heres an idea if we could create a machine that could cut out enormous chunks of water out of europa then ship them off to mars wouldnt it be a good way to marsaform?


LOL i guess. But in that case i think it would be easier to tow some of the asteroids in the asteroid-belt that consists of ice and drop them on mars. And "marsaform" would mean making something marslike. Mars is already a lot like mars, don't you think
I guess "terraform" is the word you're lookin for.



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 06:02 PM
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I actually had to do a research paper on deep-sea hydrothermal vents last semester. Pretty amazing stuff scientists are learning near these spots! The alternative to photosynthesis is called chemosynthesis. This is when bacteria or other living organisims use chemicals to convert into "food." One research team found the presence of hydrogen sulfide and iron monosulfide, which react to one another to form pyrite and hydrogen gas. The hydrogen provides the energy these organisms need to grow and survive.

Scientists are interested in these vents because they are very extreme environments, and if life can exsist around them there is a good chance that life could exist elsewhere in our galaxy on planets which contain similar vents (given, of course, that the planet has water on it).

Really interesting stuff to say the least. So much more information on these vents. I would highly suggest doing some research on the subject if you are interested in possible life on other planets, or if wierd stuff on our own planet floats your boat. Some really freaky, "alien" looking sealife live down there too!



posted on Jul, 4 2004 @ 06:34 PM
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Thanks for info, Woodside!
Really interesting and mindboggling stuff. I saw a documentary recently about life thriving near these vents -- and yes, there were some really weird lifeforms down there. Chemosynthesis, is it? Well, that would mean a great opportunity for life to exist out there, not only on Europa but elsewhere as well, whereever there is water present.

Edited because of lame spelling

[edit on 2004-7-4 by EyesOfTheFuture]





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