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US calls for re-registration of all civilian airplanes

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posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 06:46 PM
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US calls for re-registration of all civilian airplanes


www.breitbart.com

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on Friday called on US civilian plane owners to re-register their aircraft to improve their records, as one-third of the planes on their books have "questionable" registrations.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 06:46 PM
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Looks like some big changes courtesy of the FAA for all the civilian plane owners, funny how these kind of things come out late on Friday isn't it.. I would like to know just what they consider a "questionable" registration to be?
357,000 is a very big number of people to be "questionable". This seems a bit strange to me,what do you think?

www.breitbart.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by PatriotsPride
 


They have probably added a new silent adhesion clause to the registration contract.
What else could it be?



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by PatriotsPride
 


To be sure no one gets out when the time comes.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by PatriotsPrideI would like to know just what they consider a "questionable" registration to be?
357,000 is a very big number of people to be "questionable". This seems a bit strange to me,what do you think?


357,000 is the total number and about a 1/3 of those are the "questionable" ones.

While I think someone could use a better word, its things like missing paper work, incorrect addresses, missing bills of sale, dead people, etc, etc.

Don't blow things out of proportion.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by PatriotsPride
 


The number of registrations considered "questionable" is approximately 132,000 or one-third of total registrations.

I started a thread about this earlier : FAA Loses Track of 132,000 Aircrafts



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 07:18 PM
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""one-third of the planes on their books have "questionable" registrations. ""

Like the birds flying for Defense contractors/cia that have tail numbers of planes that have crashed...no longer exist.

Our entire aviation sector is based upon dirty little lies to even exist. I found it shocking when I returned to America after a decade of being overseas and found some airports are now only running small planes for commercial aviation. air traffic has dropped dramatically. Thus income has dropped dramatically.

There are stories of airline pilots being eligible for food stamps they are so underpaid now.....

We have Americans flying Zimbabwe registered cargo planes in China for income....has to tell you how bad the aviation sector truly is. Especially seeing our President flying around on that antique plane...Presidents have always been flying on cutting edge technology and their planes were changed quite frequently...we've hit a dead spot.

The 787 Dreamliner project collapse/failure....F35 project collapse/failure is another sign...our aviation sector appears to be dead.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 08:37 PM
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Sounds like just another reason to stop people travelling unless TPTB wish it by executing no fly orders unless you are 100% registered and approved.

No fly lists, obsurd airport security, terror threats, plane crashes, engine failures etc etc.

Meglomania in action folks.
edit on 10/12/2010 by nerbot because: stuff



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by PatriotsPride
 



... funny how these kind of things come out late on Friday isn't it?


It are the media who only recently stumbled upon this. There were stories EARLIER this year, during the summer, about it. As usual, it is misunderstood, and blown all out of proportion.....

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Time to repeat my posts, fromthe other two threads related to this story:


Some people (and often, in media) simply do NOT understand what they're talking about.

This is only about the FAA's poor record-keeping of airplane REGISTRATION Certificates! In most cases, involving airplanes privately owned...SMALL ones....(well, airCRAFT...since can include light-than-air, gliders, helicopters, blimps, and even some small sport-type powered paragliders.....ANYTHING that flies, and falls in the category of requirement for FAA Registration)!!!

www.faa.gov...

Article from JULY, 2010:

www.wilmerhale.com...

Article from MAY, 2010:

www.mondaq.com...

MORE (factual, not hyperbole) info:


Background

Information on the U.S. Civil Aircraft Register, a database maintained by the Aircraft Registration Branch of the FAA, is used to communicate safety-related information to aircraft owners, for law enforcement purposes, in connection with investigations of accidents or incidents and to identify aircraft, when necessary, for use by the U.S. armed forces. It also serves as a resource for individuals, banks, and other institutions involved with financing aircraft purchases. The FAA is charged with recording in the database each aircraft's registration number ("N-number"), complete description, and registered owner's name and address.

Aircraft records are created when owners of U.S.-registered aircraft file an Aircraft Registration Application (AC Form 8050-1) at the time title to the aircraft transfers to them. Once the FAA processes the application, the agency sends the owner an Aircraft Certificate of Registration (AC Form 8050-3, also known as a "Hard Card") to be carried onboard the aircraft. Hard Cards typically had no expiration date and remained valid until the FAA learned that ownership information changed, or the agency otherwise determined that an event occurred requiring revocation of the registration. A Hard Card, together with an airworthiness certificate (FAA form 8100-2 ), is essential for a U.S.-registered aircraft to operate legally in U.S. and foreign airspace.

Since at least 1980, owners of U.S.-registered aircraft have been required to self-report events that affected the information contained in the Register (e.g., the sale or destruction of their aircraft, a change in the owner's mailing address or name, etc.). While a failure to file such reports formally subjected the relevant aircraft's registration certificate to revocation, in practice, the FAA relied on owners to comply voluntarily with the update requirements and rarely investigated cases where information appeared to be inaccurate. Even when owners clearly failed to update registration details, the agency did not purge the records from its system to ensure that a new active aircraft would not be assigned an N-number still used by an aircraft being flown with a revoked registration. Rather, when an aircraft record appeared to be inaccurate, the FAA typically identified it as "questionable" and continued to maintain it in the database.
www.jonesday.com...


This has absolutely nothing, ZERO, to do with the mistaking of a jet contrail off the coast of California last month, and confusing it with a so-called "missile trail"!

This is the kind of irrelevant speculation that is ruining the seeking of logical and reasonable discourse...both in real life, on the Internet, and especially on ATS!

Also, for those who may not know (but every pilot does) there are two documents that MUST be onboard an aircraft, when it is being operated: The current (valid) Registration form, and the current Airworthiness Certificate. IN addition, if the aircraft has a radio transceiver (for communications) then it must have an FCC Radiotelephone Permit as well.

These items must be prominently displayed somewhere, usually in the cockpit, of very near by. You may ask to see them on the next airliner you fly on, if you wish. They used to be on the inside of the cockpit doors....but, with new "hardened" and secure doors, they are usually now mounted on the bulkhead, somewhere just inside the door.



edit on 10 December 2010 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2010 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by nerbot
 


Stop travelling? Unless you utilize small, personal private aircraft this really doesn't effect you in any way.



posted on Dec, 11 2010 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by Pervius
 


I normally don't do this...but can you back up anything that you have stated as fact?



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