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Neil Armstrong: Why I Didn't Walk Far on Moon

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posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 10:09 AM
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Originally posted by XyZeR
Hassleblad camera's were used on the moon, with no special alterations to the models, just a box which mounted the cams to the space suits the astronauts wore.

Incorrect. The cameras used on the moon had a number of modifications that differentiated them from the normal equivalent model. In fact, features were designed specifically because of NASA requirements and requests. Hasselblad cameras weren't simply used on moon missions alone and indeed any space mission involving extravehicular activity means that the astronaut's camera will have to deal with the same thermal conditions the moon cameras dealt with; they weren't putting the cameras directly on the lunar surface, so heat's only way of transfering to and from the camera was through radiative transfer and through transfer from contact with the astronaut himself. A good page describing the modifications and development history can be found here:
www.mir.com.my...
edit on 20-12-2010 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by XyZeR
 


See this thread for a general description.

The important thing to remember is that when we talk about temperature (as in, "how hot is it outside?") on Earth, we are talking about the temperature of the air. In space - whether you're on the Moon or just in Earth orbit, there's no air, so temperature refers to how hot a given surface is. This, in turn, is determined by how much radiant energy (i.e. sunlight) it reflects, how much it absorbs, and how much it re-radiates to space when the sun's not shining on it (remember that half of the surface of any object is facing away from the sun at any given time)

For example, here is a typical object rotating in a vacuum at the same average distance from the sun as an astronaut on the Moon. This object reflects ~37% of the light that falls on it. It absorbs the rest, but when the sun-warmed side rotates into shadow, it reradiates the energy out into space. This energy transfer results in an average temperature of 15C (59F). (source)

The Apollo Hasselblad cameras were heavily modified, and given a silvery finish to reduce absorption. (source) Residual heat conducted to the interior and kept the film from getting too cold.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by Saint Exupery


Originally posted by ngchunter


Star for you both, thanks for that explanation, it cleared up a lot of things for me.
edit on 20-12-2010 by XyZeR because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by Pervius
 


The mirrors could have been placed on the moon by mechanical devices.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 07:45 PM
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Originally posted by masterp
reply to post by Pervius
 


The mirrors could have been placed on the moon by mechanical devices.


The evidence does not support that conclusion.

Remember: Just because it could have happened a certain way, that doesn't mean it was done that way. You have to look at all of the evidence and draw your conclusion from the preponderance. Too often conspiracy theorists start with their conclusion (based on political belief, cynicism, paranoia or whatever) and cherry-pick only those things that they feel support that belief. Very often, this cherry-picked "evidence" is simply something they do not understand and/or is outside their area of expertise, training or experience. If something comes along that contradicts their belief, They fall-back on the argument that, "It could have been faked!"

"Could" doesn't mean squat. Magic elves could exist and they could have placed the Lunar Ranging Retro-Reflectors using flying unicorns.

The evidence does not support that conclusion.



posted on Dec, 27 2010 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


And our ozone blocks the suns rays. Due to no life on the moon i am guessing it has no ozone.




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