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Neil Armstrong: Why I Didn't Walk Far on Moon

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posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by Jason88

Originally posted by backinblack
reply to post by Jason88
 


No, we only call it the dark side because we never see that side from earth..
It does get as much sun as the side we see...


And here, my whole life, I thought it was always dark. That's amazing it's sunny on the dark side of the moon. Cheers


Actually, when you think about it..
The "dark side" of the moon gets MORE light than the other side...
When you look at it's orbit I'd say the Dark Side actually gets about twice as much sunlight...
Now aint that a kicker..!!




posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 10:15 PM
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Believe it or not. The solar constant, which is the energy the sun puts out in one square meter is about 1500 watts in space, and maybe 1000 on the earths surface.

So in a space suit on the moon it would be like having a 1500
watt heater warming you up minus the reflectivity of the suit. If the suit was black they would not last very long.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 04:44 AM
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Because it was a one camera set-up and they had other props out of view of the camera.

Why haven't we ever gone back to the moon I wonder? Maybe because we never did in the first place?



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 04:53 AM
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reply to post by theRhenn
 


well yes
you see outside the heliosphere is a hot gas cloud descibed as "local fluff" is a 6000 degree hot gas gas cloud formed when a supernova exploded sometime ago
as a solar system (a heliosphere) we are traveling inside this cloud and our sun projects a helio bubble around the solar system much like the earths magnetosphere
and outside the "bubble its about 6000 degress
now the galaxy has one of these bubbles and outside the galaxy there is a suspected temerature increse
nobody really knows for sure
but estimates range from 10,000 to 1,000,000 degress
i kinda like the 100,000 degress but that is a guess on my part
aparently space can be quite hot
taking a galaxys temperature

xploder
edit on 10-12-2010 by XPLodER because: add link



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 07:23 AM
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reply to post by Extremador
 





Why haven't we ever gone back to the moon I wonder? Maybe because we never did in the first place?


Because there is not enough money in NASA budget to operate the shuttles, build the ISS, and go to the Moon all at once.

reply to post by XPLodER
 





but estimates range from 10,000 to 1,000,000 degress


The matter in space is hot, but that just means that the particles are moving with high average velocity. The space is vacuum with a few hot particles here and there, and thats not enough to keep anything warm. Thus everything not heated up by the light of a star will freeze anyway.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 09:40 AM
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Originally posted by dillweed
You're exactly right black, the moon rotates at a rate similar to that of the earth so that it always apppears the same to us . Couple that with the moon being exactly the right diameter to cause a nearly perfect eclipse when passing between us and the sun, and then tell me there is no God. That it's all a coincidence. Really?


the moon is moving away from earth at several inches a year. thousands of years ago the moon completely blocked out the sun during eclipses. in a couple thousand years the ring of light around the moon during an eclipse will be more pronounced. and some time in the very distant future the moon will leave the earth's gravitational field entirely and become a rogue moon, drifting through the stars. it really is just a coincidence.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by optimus primal
 


Eventually the humans will put the moon back. no one will let it escape, it is necessary to earth's life.
My neice met Neil Armstrong at a party. My sister in law says he's a really private person. Gosh I
would love to meet him, but I wouldn't know what important questions to ask. A long time family friend bought his
property and throws parties he occassionally comes to. He's reallyolder now, and I thought he taught at the local college. She said when he moved out he filled up a dumpster with loads of hotel samples. How funny! He is frugal and doesn't want to spend time buying shampoo?



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by frugal
 


i don't think anyone will be around when the moon finally escapes earth. we'll either be out somewhere else in the galaxy, or extinct.



posted on Dec, 11 2010 @ 02:39 AM
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There seems to be a lot of confusion of the nature of heat on the Lunar surface. I've started a new thread that will hopefully clarify the issue.
edit on 11-12-2010 by Saint Exupery because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2010 @ 07:03 AM
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reply to post by optimus primal
 


there is no darkside to the moon. all sides of the moon get hit by the sun throughout the day(24 hours). if you mean the side not facing the sun at any given moment, then yes it would be really really really cold.

Really? No dark side? 24 hour lunar rotation?
There is a dark side to the Moon. It is the side facing away from the Sun, you know...the shaded side.

The Moon takes about 29.5 days to make one orbit around Earth, called a lunar month or synodic month (new Moon to new Moon), and since its axis of rotation is the same as Earth's one side always faces us.
During a new Moon, at noon here on Earth, we see the dark side and during a full Moon, midnight here on Earth, the dark side is facing away or it is on the "Far" side of the Moon (the 'dark' side and 'far' side do not have the same meaning).
Here are a series of images of a lunar month. The odd rocking motion seen in this video is called lunar librations.

Notice how the full Moon looks larger, because it is a bit closer due to Earth's gravity, and smaller during a new Moon, because of the Sun's gravity. Also notice that we can see the dark side once every month.
edit on 12/11/2010 by Devino because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2010 @ 07:04 AM
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i read this earlier and was extremely confused



posted on Dec, 11 2010 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by Devino
 


i was incorrect about the rotation. however it is quite well known that many people mistake the far side of the moon for the darkside of the moon. certainly all sides recieve sunlight. i was pointing out that the far side is not dark all the time like the misconception has been in the thread.



posted on Dec, 12 2010 @ 01:42 PM
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Why didn't I walk far on Moon?


Because the stage was small.



posted on Dec, 13 2010 @ 06:20 AM
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if we didn't go to the moon then explain the laser reflectors on the moon's surface.

Debunk that.

www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread385937/pg1

retro reflector's aye?

saying it was fake is partially off- topic and discussion should be about neil and his 100yrd trek.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 05:20 AM
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Originally posted by Devino
The Moon takes about 29.5 days to make one orbit around Earth, called a lunar month or synodic month (new Moon to new Moon), and since its axis of rotation is the same as Earth's one side always faces us.


I think what you meant to say is that the rotation period of the moon (the time it takes to rotate 360 degrees on its axis) is the same duration as its synodic month, thus the same side always faces Earth.


Originally posted by Devino
Here are a series of images of a lunar month. The odd rocking motion seen in this video is called lunar librations.

Notice how the full Moon looks larger, because it is a bit closer due to Earth's gravity, and smaller during a new Moon, because of the Sun's gravity.


Great illustration, but your explanation is not correct. Your gif shows us three different effects, all caused by the Moons orbit around the Earth. These effects are:

1.) The Moon moving closer and further away.
The Moon (like nearly everything else in the solar system) is in an elliptical orbit, varying its distance from the Earth from 357,000 to 407,000 km. Source

B.) The side-to-side swaying (east-west libration).
Gravity decreases with range, so that an object such as the Moon moves more slowly in its orbit when it is farther away, and speeds up again as it moves closer. This means that although the Moon rotates on its axis at a regular rate, its speed as it goes around the Earth varies.
The Moon rotates from west-to-east (counter-clockwise when viewed from the north) or as shown in the above illustration, left-to-right (for readers in the southern hemisphere of earth, this picture is upside-down from the way you normally see the Moon).
When the Moon's elliptical orbit swings it out away from the Earth (and its image gets smaller), its orbital speed slows down to less than its rotational speed. Since the rotation is getting ahead, we see the Moon rotating further to the east (left-to-right) and we can see a bit of the farside on the western (left) edge of the visible disc.
As the Moon swings back closer to the Earth (and seems to grow larger), its orbital speed picks-up so that it is greater than its rotational speed. This makes it look like the Moon is swinging back to the west (from right-to-left), and we can peek around the eastern (right) side of the disc.
That's what makes it appear to swing back-and-forth.

III.) The up-and-down nodding (north-south libration).
The Moon's orbit is inclined to the Earth's equator. Also, its axis of rotation is not parallel to the Earth's. This means that depending on where it is in its orbit, sometimes its north pole is tilted towards the Earth, and sometimes the south pole is tilted towards the Earth. In the course of a lunar month, this makes like the Moon is nodding towards us and away from us.

This is why, in the above illustration, the Moon seems to be wobbling all over the place. When I was previewing this post, I had to scroll the image off the screen because it was making me dizzy!


Even before we sent the first probes to photograph the far side of the Moon, the librations allowed us to map ~10% of it.

The Sun's gravity does influence the Moon's orbit according to a regular cycle, but the effects are too subtle to be seen in a single month. See Saros Cycle



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 06:02 AM
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Neil Armstrong: Why i didnt walk far on the moon!!!

Maybe because he wasn't there in the first place!



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by Uncle Gravity
 


He walked on it alright:
legacy.jefferson.kctcs.edu...
I also recommend reading "Observations of Apollo 11" in the November 1969 issue of Sky and Telescope, p 358-359.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 12:45 PM
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Originally posted by quantumdragon
if we didn't go to the moon then explain the laser reflectors on the moon's surface.

Debunk that.




You do know that they fired a laser at the moon hoping to reflect off of supposed "mirrors" we placed there and only 1 part per billion "speck" was supposedly picked up as "reflecting" off of the moon?

The same speck you'd expect to record due to distortions in the atmosphere which makes stars appear to twinkle.

If you read about the "laser reflecting" event, it wasn't really compelling evidence.



posted on Dec, 14 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by Saint Exupery
 



Originally posted by Devino
The Moon takes about 29.5 days to make one orbit around Earth, called a lunar month or synodic month (new Moon to new Moon), and since its axis of rotation is the same as Earth's one side always faces us.

I think what you meant to say is that the rotation period of the moon (the time it takes to rotate 360 degrees on its axis) is the same duration as its synodic month, thus the same side always faces Earth.

No, what I meant to say is what I said. Perhaps it would be better to say the Moon's axis of rotation is near the center of Earth and maybe not the same as the Earth's. However a synodic month is not a true 360° orbit.

Sidereal, tropical, synodic and anomalistic orbits are all different. A true 360° orbit of the Moon around Earth is a sidereal month which is close to a tropical month. A tropical month is a bit different due to Earth's precession. A synodic orbit, which is a bit more than 360° due to Earth's solar orbit, is how we measure a lunar month, new moon to new moon.
The Moon's Tidal lock with Earth means that these two bodies have the same axis of rotation, or at least near the same, so a lunar rotation can be considered the same as a lunar orbit. The important thing is that all of these observations are related to but not the same as each other.


Great illustration, but your explanation is not correct. Your gif shows us three different effects, all caused by the Moons orbit around the Earth.

OK, I did a poor job of explaining this one. I think the statement that these effects are, "all caused by the Moons orbit around the Earth", is a bit ambiguous. Some of these effects are caused by the Earth and its motions.

In hindsight I think I should have added in my reply to optimus primal that these motions are complicated and not easily understood. I agree with him in that there is a lot of misconception with the Moon's dark side.


When I was previewing this post, I had to scroll the image off the screen because it was making me dizzy!

I know, it distracts me too, sorry. Hit the 'esc' key to stop the animation. This is the reason I don't like animated avatars. This illustration gives a good understanding of lunar motions though.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 09:00 AM
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Great post op!

With all this talk about the extreme temperatures i have a somewhat stupid question, that some debunker will hopefully answer.(please do, i'dd love to hear how they did this)

Hassleblad camera's were used on the moon, with no special alterations to the models, just a box which mounted the cams to the space suits the astronauts wore.
Now...do you know what happens to photographic film-emulsion at those temperatures (both extreme negative and extreme positive) It either freezes or it melts, so how come we have such perfect clear pictures of the moon-landings...?

Don't get me wrong, i don't claim the USA never landed on the moon, what i do doubt, is the photo's we've seen.



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