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Japan probe reaches Venus but shuts itself down

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posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 08:43 PM
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TOKYO – A Japanese space probe sent to the thick clouds of Venus shut itself down, and its future looks as hazy as the planet it was built to study. The probe, called Akatsuki, which means "dawn," reached Venus on Tuesday to orbit Earth's neighbor on a two-year mission. But communication problems left scientists in the dark about whether it was successfully in orbit. An American scientist on the probe's research team said the probe shut itself partially down and is in safe mode. That means it is sending back signals indicating it is alive, but not transmitting any data.


Link for Full Story

Wow, I didn't even know they had a probe heading to venus. You think there will be any way they can get it out of safe mode from this distance if they have some form of communication from it? It would be great to get some stuff from venus for something new and different.
edit on 7-12-2010 by onehuman because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by onehuman
 


That is a shame. They must be feeling terrible.

I don't think there is any way they can get it back. Probes there only last a few minutes.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by onehuman
 


Man, its going to be insane if we see a bunch of souls running amok in the 5th density or something like that.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 08:58 PM
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SAFE MODE. I have to ask what is the point of putting a safe mode in the programing if you can not get it out of safe mode by remote? The may as well rename the SAFE MODE to SHUT DOWN MODE. This is not the first time I have heard about a probe going into safe mode for good. It make this safe mode note very safe when it is a one way street. I had rather have a space probe computer fry to a crisp than to go in to a safe mode that it could never be gotten out of. What are they running on they probes any way, Windows ME?

They are way too many probes that just fail at the last minute of just get lost. I do not think that is really the case. Think about it. You launch a space probe and every one knows it is being sent up. but you let people think that it failed but in fact it is working just fine then you do not have to let any one know anything about what it is doing or may find. It is as good as launching a space probe that no one knows any thing about. I am thinking that a lot of the so called failed space probes did not fail but did just and they were made to do.

It is like the old dead satellite game.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 08:59 PM
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my Venusian brothers were not yet ready to be viewed. nah, but really, conditions on venus are pretty harsh. i'd be interested in seeing the probe's reports



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 09:12 PM
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Very odd... Must have been a Toyota Satellite.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 09:14 PM
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Here is a link to the JAXA, which will give you some information. Unfortunately the page hasn't updated yet.So there is no current news.

Here is a link to YOU TUBE, who have a very interesting vid on the mission.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 09:28 PM
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reply to post by onehuman
 


I think they finally ran out of extension cord



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 01:39 AM
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www.space.com...


A Japanese Venus probe failed in its mission to enter into orbit around the hellishly hot planet Monday (Dec. 6). The spacecraft may be able to try again in seven years, or it may be gone for good


The orbital insertion burn didn't last long enough, so it didn't enter the orbit of Venus. Instead it's on a solar orbit, which will bring it to venus again in 7 years...

They don't know what the cause of failure was yet.


jra

posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 02:58 AM
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Originally posted by fixer1967
SAFE MODE. I have to ask what is the point of putting a safe mode in the programing if you can not get it out of safe mode by remote?


But you can. It happens often enough and many times they do get out of safe mode. The Cassini probe that's currently around Saturn went into safe mode just last month and that wasn't the first time either if I recall, but it's fine now. The rovers on Mars have gone into safe mode a few times as well.

Take a look at this list of recent spacecrafts that have gone into safe mode.


I had rather have a space probe computer fry to a crisp than to go in to a safe mode that it could never be gotten out of.


You'd rather blow millions on a spacecraft that took years to develop rather than have a way to recover it?! ok then...


They are way too many probes that just fail at the last minute of just get lost. I do not think that is really the case...


Well this is rocket science after all, no one said it was easy.



Anyway, it's a damn shame for JAXA that this happened. They've had some bad luck with previous missions and I was really looking forward to this one. But at least it's not a total loss... we'll just have to wait 7 years for them to try again.



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 03:08 AM
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did they try last know good configuration?
if not they will need to insert windows disk and restore to an early point



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by onehuman
 


The part that interest me is this fact


signals indicating that spaceship may be wobbling a bit


and then the two scientists who can't agree what happened to it, is it in orbit or not...



TextLimaye said it was unclear if the probe was successfully inserted into orbit around Venus, but Gerald Schubert, a University of California, Los Angeles, scientist who is on the probe team, said he thinks it is in some kind of orbit around the hazy planet.


So maybe they can still salvage it. Even if it floats off into space , it should be able to send back some cool pictures, as long as they can transmit data again...



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by jra
 


Where do you get the 7 years from?

they don't even know in what orbit it is yet?

edit on 8-12-2010 by Nightfury because: Typo



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 08:00 AM
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I guess that means quit it.
2nd



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 08:03 AM
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Space-Fail!
2nd.



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 09:08 AM
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For sure they are finding things they can't tell us.
Perhaps a transmission from Venus saying it came from Jupiter and Velikovsky was right.
Or just more reaffirmation that bugs and oil and other associated predictions from Velikovsky
were found to the embarrassment of the official science.
I like to think The Alien sized bugs rule Venus and ate the probe.



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by FoxStriker
Very odd... Must have been a Toyota Satellite.


Hahaha, they cant call this one back.



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by MacAnkka
 

This was something I was thinking of myself, the spacecraft coming back around for another try in a few years. Thanks for posting this information.


reply to post by Nightfury
 


Originally posted by Nightfury

Where do you get the 7 years from?

they don't even know in what orbit it is yet?


JAXA officials are considering whether to try to insert Akatsuki again in seven years, when the probe will come close enough to Venus once more, according to the news service Agence-France Presse.
Space.com

There have been discarded rocket engines from previous missions to Venus over the decades that end up in an Earth/Venus solar orbit. Since the discarded pieces did not achieve a Venusian orbit they end up orbiting the Sun on a path which takes it on close approaches to both Earth and Venus. If the spacecraft's trajectory creates an elliptical orbit it will repeat, slowly degrading over time.

I think that there is a good chance to recover the mission on its next Venus fly by if it has enough fuel to get into a Venus orbit. While we wait it can still take pictures of other things like the Sun or perhaps a comet that might happen to pass by in the future.



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by jra
Well this is rocket science after all, no one said it was easy.
Dang! You mean I can't use my favorite expression "It's not rocket science?"




Anyway, it's a damn shame for JAXA that this happened. They've had some bad luck with previous missions and I was really looking forward to this one. But at least it's not a total loss... we'll just have to wait 7 years for them to try again.
I hope it their next chance in 7 years is successful...if they can keep it alive that long.

It looks like the conspiracy theorists will be claiming the Venusians are the ones who interrupted the orbital insertion burn prematurely because they didn't want to be observed?


jra

posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur
It looks like the conspiracy theorists will be claiming the Venusians are the ones who interrupted the orbital insertion burn prematurely because they didn't want to be observed?


I guess those Venusian's don't mind the ESA and their Venus Express spacecraft, which has been in orbit since 2006 and will be going till at least Dec 2012. Curse those highly selective Venusian's!



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