UTTR, Utah

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posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by TedHodgson
reply to post by surfnow2
 


If it was That secret you wouldnt know about it.
REALLY. www.youtube.com... It looks like to me that they are building something that you and i are not invited to my friend. These complexes are all around the world and believe me the tech is high tech if you ask me. These planes or crafts and bases are not only to put them in but to store other things. hmmmm, interesting. The only thing good about it is that the populace has E.T in the brain in our favor, sos they think it don't exist.




posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by nite owl
 


well if u want to confirm these are missile silos just start at minot air force base
maps.google.com...(MIB),+Minot+AFB,+ND+58704&gl=us&ei=BA4ATdGyMIWClAekrM3MCA&sa=X&oi=geocode_r esult&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CBcQ8gEwAA

and out to 300 miles of the base looked for small barbed wire fenced in areas.



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by nite owl
 


You are very off topic here. However, I know about all the areas in that youtube video and none of them are very secret. Secure yes, but not secret.

Hellendale is the Lockheed facility. You can see it in the "Battle of the X Planes" from Nova. Tom Mahood went well out of his way to show the facility isn't sinister, just a RCS, one of many in the US. The test article does rise from underground, but that is just to frustrate yahoos like me that go snooping there, plus keep the article hidden from aircraft that like to detour over the facility to see what's cooking. There is security there for sure. There is an automated guard shack of sorts on the south side of the facility that looks very "robo copish." Basically lots of cameras so that they can see who you are without actually manning it.

The Northrup facility is a bit harder to snoop on, but not impossible. To my knowledge, it doesn't have the underground pylon scheme. If they did, the pylons wouldn't be visible all the time.

In the mix of images, they showed the two General Atomics UAV facilities. El Mirage is for Army UAVs. Grey Butte is USAF and probably CIA is there, if only for training. The Grey Butte facility is much more secure than El Mirage. For El Mirage, you park to the west of the aircraft junkyard, and you can watch them fly UAVs. For Grey Butte, it is a bit harder to watch. There is no area really out of their watchful eye. The best thing is to hang back a mile or so to the west and wait for something to fly, then swoop in and get a shot.

The other facility is Haystack Butte near Edwards. It might still be part of the base.It was to be used for the Venture Star reusable space craft, but GW Bush killed the project as soon as he took office. [Golly, California ain't Texas. Why are we spending money there on a project Al Gore pushed.] The land was ordered to be sold to prevent the project from coming back to life. Haystack Butte is very very visible from route 395 and also from "the spot" at the back of Edwards.



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by gariac
 


techniclly the topic is about UTTR. not sure how we ended up with that youtube video, oh well



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by dplum517
 


if thry fly a regular schedule can you get pics?
Maybe we can identfy them?



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 09:43 PM
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I took these pictures when I was down in the area in October. This is entrance to UTTR at 41° 1'48.06"N, 112°55'14.11"W





Regarding last picture - if you go on GE to the coordinates above, this sign was on the road that heads north (there is a Y in the road at the border). The other road goes NW into the base.

I am wondering if the road going north is passable by civilians. I see no guard shack on this road in GE. The KEEP OUT signs were concentrated on the other road going NW. Unfortunately, I didn't have the guts to test this theory when I was there.



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by FosterVS
 


Those photos are kind of stealthy if you know what I mean. ;-) Can you try again, or is it just me that can't see them?



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 11:54 PM
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There are other weapon systems tests that occasionally go on out at UTTR that are most definitely NOT gunnery or missile tests.

You don't want to hang out there or be poking around when one happens, either. You really don't.

Some six years back, some guys were snooping around and got a nice dose of gamma radiation, out at the edge of the fence. Sometimes the odd test run works way better than you expected, I suppose.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Nice does of gamma radiation. OK how is this verified?



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 12:38 AM
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Originally posted by gariac
reply to post by Bedlam
 

Nice does of gamma radiation. OK how is this verified?


Typically with a gamma ray spectrometer, if you want to get really good readings, but you can also use a GM counter.


In their case, they got sick, "sunburned", puking, fogged film, malfing electronics, bad blood counts, even got a nice fog that came up - it was a night and the temp was right at the dew point. It was like a big cloud chamber. You had to be there.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 01:13 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


So did they have a geiger counter? To say they got nuked is the kind of statement that needs instrumentation to back up. You don't suddenly get gamma rays from a government base. For instance, the NTS takes great precaution when they have open sources. Barricades are set up to stop personnel without protection.

Often nuclear stories are spread as disinformation, i.e. to keep the looky-loos away.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 03:27 AM
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Originally posted by gariac
So did they have a geiger counter?


WE had them, afaik, the civilians on the fence did not, or they would have been less mystified as to what happened to them. The nature of the test was that gamma radiation was going to be the major product, we just weren't quite expecting the amount we got.



To say they got nuked is the kind of statement that needs instrumentation to back up. You don't suddenly get gamma rays from a government base.


In this case, you sure did. It was one of those Castle Bravo level whoopsies.



Often nuclear stories are spread as disinformation, i.e. to keep the looky-loos away.


In this case, it's not widely known. The guys that got remmed posted a nice web page about the "mystery" of their crapped out computers, fogged film, health issues and whatnot. It's going to be interesting in a sort of minor way to see how it works out for them over time.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


So just who is we?

Call me skeptical on this story.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 12:54 PM
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Originally posted by gariac
reply to post by Bedlam
 


So just who is we?

Call me skeptical on this story.


Fine by me. If you run across the guy's website, you'll know what I'm talking about. They don't know what got them yet - that's one of those sites I visit to see if someone spills the beans. So far, no one's gotten close to the actual explanation either for the physical effects they observed or the nature of the system, at least not that he's posted, and he posts pretty much everything as far as I can tell. I especially liked the attempt to use "remote viewing" to figure it out.

The business end for the system was supposed to deliver to an aerial target several thousand feet up, and while it was expected that it would be visible (couldn't really prevent that) no one was expecting the conversion efficiency it ended up with, it was several orders of magnitude better than prediction. The targeting was all that was being tested, that's a primary be-yotch with this thing. Of course, the brass decided to go ahead with the entire test series rather than "WTF - abort" which would have been my decision if I were in the position to decide. But it's a shiny, shiny new toy.

Anyways, if you're out there at night and they run another series, it'll be unmistakable. At the dose rate they got, you might get blocking with a GM; you might want to take a film badge. If you see really bright streaks of light in the sky that don't reach all the way to the ground, your laptop bites it and a fog comes up, unass the AO, unless you're just suicidal.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by surfnow2
 


Google
ken collins a-12 crash 24 May 1963 wendover

I have the CIA declassified report. Having the crash report doesn't exactly lead you to the crash site. These old reports generally give a VOR, distance, and radial to the crash site. They are often miles off. The accounts of the incidents are pretty interesting. Collins was given a drug to help him remember the events in better detail.

I spent quite a bit of google earth and topo map time plus talking to the locals to find the Jeremiah Weed crash. Eventually I found it by matching topo data from the crash report with topo data from Garmin mapsource, then using Google Earth to simulate the view from the crash report.

Jeremiah Weed crash

Finding these sites is hard to do from your armchair. The F-4 crash site near Rachel just barely shows up on Google Earth, and there is a ton of debris there. The A-12 crash sites are cleaned up to a much higher degree. I was kind of shocked how much of the Jeremiah Weed crash wasn't there, given how most F-4 crash sites are not cleaned up very well.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 02:39 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Did I miss a link to the website?

Why wouldn't a nuclear test be done at, oh say, the NTS, which is the nation's nuclear proving ground?

People can post all sorts of nonsense on the net. Take Dulce for example. Publishing something on the net doesn't make it true.

I



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by gariac
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Did I miss a link to the website?

Why wouldn't a nuclear test be done at, oh say, the NTS, which is the nation's nuclear proving ground?


It wasn't a nuclear test, per se.

And you won't find anything much published about it on a website, although at one time there were more bread crumbs out there that the USAF left lying here and there, they seem to have cleaned a lot of that up when they classified and removed some of the indirectly associated technical papers and studies that once were on the net.

The guy's website doesn't have any info, other than some fogged pics of the system firing and a description of their personal after effects from the exposure, which they don't properly attribute. I do especially like his description of the sudden fog formation. Very amusing in a schadenfreude sort of way.

I purposely didn't put a link to his website, it's useful to see if he figures it out.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


I see you rather waste my time and anyone else reading this thread rather than publish a link.

Yeah, now I'm sure this never happened. More Dulce fairy tales.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by gariac
reply to post by Bedlam
 


I see you rather waste my time and anyone else reading this thread rather than publish a link.

Yeah, now I'm sure this never happened. More Dulce fairy tales.


Then you must be right.

Frankly, I get a blast out of posting stuff that's real to ATS occasionally, just for guys like you to blow it off for "aliens from the fourth density" or whatnot. We used to do it over at Fark as well. Like one of the AFFTC guys used to say - it's a lot more fun to tell them the truth and have them spit at you than to make up crap.

I suppose you don't believe that some of the aircraft over at Groom Lake glowed in the dark, either.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Just the facts, mamm, just the facts. When I write something is rumor, I say rumor.

There are plenty of real events to be researched rather than internet fairy tales.





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