Persian Gulf sites hint at prehistoric people

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posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:58 PM
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December 06, 2010

Emerging archeological evidence points to early human habitation 120,000 years ago in a Persian "Gulf Oasis" now underwater, suggests one archeologist.

In the upcoming Current Anthropology journal study, Jeffrey Rose of the United Kingdom's University of Birmingham, points to stone tools from 40 archeological sites throughout the Middle East to suggest that modern humans left Africa earlier than many model suggest (typically around 60,000 years ago), and populated Arabian coastal areas now underwater.



"The emerging picture of prehistoric Arabia suggests that early modern humans were able to survive periodic hyperarid oscillations by contracting into environmental refugia around the coastal margins of the peninsula," begins the study. The end of an Ice Age flooded today's Persian Gulf around 8,000 years ago, Rose notes, as sea levels rose. "There is a noticeable spike in settlement activity around the shoreline of the Gulf between 8,500 and 6,000 years ago," Rose says.

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This is a great find, there are underwater cities and hints of past civilizations being found all over the world at the present time, Graham Hancock did dives off the coast of Japan in the nineties and there are pictures and film of an underwater city there. This is just the tip of the iceberg so to speak.

If it is true that there was only one continent at one time and they have split into what we see today I can only imagine what may be underwater and how many civilizations may have been lost.
edit on 7-12-2010 by Aquarius1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:26 PM
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Interesting find and well worthy of a star and flag.

There is no telling what all lurks underneath the oceans that have been covered up by the slowly rising waters as areas became submerged.

During the recent droughts in the South East United States some massive man made lakes began drying up and made roads that had long been submerged by the lakes passable again!

Would'nt it be something if one day receding oceans began revealing these lost places to us again in a similar way?

It's amazing how far back civilizations actually existed compared to the generally held belief that there was none of signifgance until 6,000 to 8,000 years ago.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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Nice find.

I would have flagged it if you hadn't wandered off into dreamtime with your Hancock reference and the claim about Yonaguni, a completely natural formation.

Better to let this thread sink to the bottom also because of the first reply. People that don't know the meaning of the word "civilization" shouldn't try to use it. It only makes them look ignorant.

Thanks for the info.

Harte



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 04:11 PM
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Signs of human habitation do not a civilization make... still a very nice find.

The Arabian peninsula may have offered a refuge point for glacial periods, but most of the human population was driven to a number of basins in Africa where ancient "paleo-lakes" have been identified. (source - Geoscience.com)

Mini ice-ages may have further stranded isolated pockets of humans in places like the gulf region, events like the Toba eruption have spawned disruption theories along those lines.

I love finds like these, anything that pushes back the time-line of what we know about our origins.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 05:22 PM
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Originally posted by Harte
Nice find.

I would have flagged it if you hadn't wandered off into dreamtime with your Hancock reference and the claim about Yonaguni, a completely natural formation.



Actually there are two camps of thought when it comes to the ruins off the coast of Japan you are referencing. As with most things proved and unproved, in Western Culture there is simply a two sided coin presented on most things that you are tasked with chosing one absolute or the other.

Sometimes it can be very challenging, like whether to flag a thread and add something of quality and informative substance, or just to attempt to profer a personal opinion one tries to then seek validation for by defaming or otherwise deminishing those that don't share it.

Either way the two sided coin, amazingly allows for profit on both sides, with proponents and naysayers each after money and fame by approaching the same thing from opposite sides.

When it comes to the ruins of Japan you do have those two camps, and I personally don't feel either have a conclusive argument at this point.

At least none that I have seen or your reference rich post provided.




Better to let this thread sink to the bottom also because of the first reply. People that don't know the meaning of the word "civilization" shouldn't try to use it. It only makes them look ignorant.


Indeed many people on ATS do struggle with the term civilized often meant to infer a genteel standard of manners and probity that despite the strict terms of service some people love to flout nonetheless.

Not every member can churn out a true highly regarded masterpiece like “New findings on Antikythera Mechanism” and I think that’s something in general most members might be grateful for.

Your post laden with such an abundance of topical information has given me much to think about.

Thanks!



posted on Dec, 8 2010 @ 08:47 PM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler
Not every member can churn out a true highly regarded masterpiece like “New findings on Antikythera Mechanism” and I think that’s something in general most members might be grateful for.



Good one ProtoplasmicTraveler!
LOL

You'd do better to search my posts. I don't make many threads here.

Again, that really did crack me up.

Harte



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 08:35 AM
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Very interesting, thanks for sharing. S+F

Another proof that history books must be rewritten and that knowledge of our past is definitely partial and incomplete. is the flood mentioned in the article in some ways connected to the Great Flood? Are we maybe talking about the same catastrophic event?



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 08:37 AM
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An article on Fox News about this has been the subject of another thread, now closed


lost civilization in the Persian Gulf



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 08:39 AM
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en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...
lates_tect2_en.svg

here is a recent model of the tectonic plates, the wiki entry notes that
some plates are 'primary', 'secondary' or 'tertiry'...

looking at the specific area where the Arabian plate and the Indian plate
meet, one can see that the present Persian Gulf and a portion of the Indian
Ocean (noted as darker yellow = gulf of Oman) might well be the land known as the Garden/Eden
from which the 4 major rivers arise.

*note that the gulf of Aden is the southern most point of this meeting between
the African plate and the Arabian plate... see the threads on ATS about Aden
and the earthquakes centered there, the 1st stages of creating a new body of water
seperate from the Suez and the Red Sea
edit on 9-12-2010 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by Harte
 





the claim about Yonaguni, a completely natural formation


I think the human nature of the Yonaguni undersee formations is obvious and evident. I've never seen in my life perfectly squared rocks.

Yonaguni undersee ruins



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by Aquarius1
 


S & F

Adds more weight to the hypotheses I outlined earlier when I wrote the following two threads. Don't let the thread titles fool you. They are related.

Origins of Atlantis/Lemuria Myths Part-1

and

Origins of Atlantis/Lemuria Myths Part-2
edit on 9-12-2010 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Thanks for links to your Atlantis Part 1 & 2, I wasn't active on ATS at the time you put up those threads and I missed them..

Glad that you feel my thread validates yours.

Thanks for posting.



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 09:40 PM
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I was watching a rerun of Ancient Aliens today and a comment was made that 250 ruins of underwater cities have been discovered ...... in the Mediterranian alone. Not sure if this is true, just parroting what I heard. I mean, if it was on TV, it must be true. Right? I realize the Mediterranian is not the Persian Gulf, our topic, but I thought the point many discoveries are being made around the world is on topic. This is one of my favorite subjects, I love reading about the possibilities about our past. Great post.



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by Tippys Dad
 





I mean, if it was on TV, it must be true. Right?


Of course it's true if you saw it on TV..
I do think that is correct, in fact I believe there are many more and we don't hear about them. There are some who deny that they exist, guess it doesn't fit their current paradigm.

Thanks for posting.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 07:14 AM
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Originally posted by Hundroid
[I think the human nature of the Yonaguni undersee formations is obvious and evident. I've never seen in my life perfectly squared rocks.

Then you are either hypertensive or need glasses:



Also:




Originally posted by Aquarius1
Of course it's true if you saw it on TV..
I do think that is correct, in fact I believe there are many more and we don't hear about them. There are some who deny that they exist, guess it doesn't fit their current paradigm.

Interesting. Mind linking us to some statements denying the existence of underwater ruins in the Med. that were made by these skeptics?

Ruins at the bottom of the Mediterreanean Sea are well-documented and completely explained by the tectonic activity and vulcanism in the region, which is at the point of collision between the African and Eurasian plates.

Harte
edit on 12/10/2010 by Harte because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 02:34 PM
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I was reading this article news.yahoo.com... and was wondering if this topic was brought up and it was! Yes indeed there is a lot of history that needs to be re-explored and redefined. I have a few theories on all these lost civilizations that are being discovered lately, but I will bite my tongue and utter TPTB.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by OptimistPrime
I was reading this article news.yahoo.com... and was wondering if this topic was brought up and it was! Yes indeed there is a lot of history that needs to be re-explored and redefined. I have a few theories on all these lost civilizations that are being discovered lately, but I will bite my tongue and utter TPTB.


Actually (I read the archaeological papers on this www.journals.uchicago.edu... ) "TPTB" know there are older sites to be found and are trying to find them.

To scientists, Earth is a huge "Crime Scene: Prehistory!" We don't know much about the Earth and we are continually new evidence about our earlier history. There's a race to find the oldest traces of towns and villages.

That said, 7,000 BC isn't that unusual... there are actually a few sites older than that. But 7,000 BC is right around the time that people all around the Mediterranean started living in permanent settlements (with Real Buildings (often made out of dried mud) and had some stone buildings and started domesticating farm animals and farming crops.

The first civilizations are in the same area but are actually older than 7,000 years -- TPTB (scientists) know they're at least 12,000 years old (and we've TOLD people that the best evidence shows civilization arises right about the end of the last Ice Age, but nobody seems to want to listen to them) :
en.wikipedia.org...

One of the problems in studying this area is that there are constant wars (Iraq, Iran, Jordan, Israel) and it's very hard to do archaeological work in the middle of a conflict. Imagine cops trying to investigate a crime scene while gangs around them are shooting at the cops and at each other -- that's the kind of difficulty encountered in studying these civilizations. Evidence gets lost or blown up or stolen and sold on the black market.

The area that's called an "oasis" is simply an area that was out of water when the earth was colder and was used as a resource for game and water and so on. They didn't find any great stone temples (they found pots and flint knives and the like).

P.S. Science is ALWAYS being rewritten... and so is history. Imagine if we never changed our school textbooks -- you'd be learning that Washington was still president of the United States (but nothing about any presidents after that) and that when someone has a cold or pneumonia, you put live leeches all over their body to make them better and that "bad air" gives you malaria (nobody suspected mosquitoes back then... they thought it was just bad air.)



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


You mention the area's that are so rich in ancient archeology and how it is so difficult to dig in those areas since there is so much conflict at the present time, another sad thing about this is that so much has been is being destroyed.

Updating history is another problem, the text today are no where near accurate, I don't know what it takes to get information changed so students know the truth, good grief they are sill teaching kids that Columbus discovered America.

Thanks for posting.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Speaking of Iran, just came across this article.



Newly discovered Iranian petroglyph panels under threat

December, 09 2010

Petroglyphs recently discovered at a site near the town of Gotvand in Iran are being threatened by the use of heavy machinery in nearby construction projects, reported the Persian, Mehr News Agency

Recently members of the Khuzestan's Friends of the Cultural Heritage Association (TARIANA) and the Bum-o-Aftab Friends of the Cultural Heritage Society have discovered a number of sandstone panels bearing eleven petroglyphs consisting of ibex and human forms. In 2009, four similar petroglyphs had been discovered by archaeologists in the same area.


www.archaeologydaily.com...


Here we go, these panels may get destroyed because of construction, if it isn't war it's something else. I hope that these Petroglyphs will be saved.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by Harte
 





hen you are either hypertensive or need glasses:


I already wear glasses, thanks


The first link to the external image is broken, nothing comes up. The second shows some crystalline-kind rocks but it can never be a proof that Yonaguni is natural formation. It says that some crystals (calcite in that case) can be square shaped, and that's it. I believe you are the one who needs glasses, and very good ones!





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