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Gulf Oil Spill Kill Zone, 80-Square Miles In Size, Found Near BP Well (VIDEO)

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posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:01 PM
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Gulf Oil Spill Kill Zone, 80-Square Miles In Size, Found Near BP Well (VIDEO)


www.huffingtonpost.com

Despite the government's estimate that less than 25 percent of the oil remains, scientists attest that it is not all gone, but rather settled at the bottom of the ocean. Joye states that she saw about three to four inches of material on the ocean floor. On top of this, scientists believe that the spill has caused the deaths of all marine life for 80-square miles on the sea floor. Despite these findings, BP is challenging the government's oil spill estimates, claiming they are too large by as much as 50 percent in an effort to lower the fines they face.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
abcnews.go.com




posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:01 PM
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Not that this is a surprise, a dead zone of all marine life 80-square miles in radius. My purpose for posting this news is to not let BP, Haliburton and Transocean (US & UK) off the hook for this global disaster.

And honestly, I really don't think we've even felt the impact of this yet in the rest of the world.

The video is at the ABC news link. The summation of the story is on HuffingtonPost.com

www.huffingtonpost.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:05 PM
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the gulf of mexico already had a huge "dead zone" before the oil spill. Because of the the crap in the mississippi river pouring out into the gulf.

Not taking up for bp, but 80 miles is nothing lol



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


I don't have the computer skills, but maybe a pro on ATS can show us what 80-square miles on a scale map of the gulf looks like?



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 


Not really sure, but here is the info I found on the gulf dead zone. from wikil

Gulf of Mexico

Currently the most notorious dead zone is a 22,126 square kilometre (8,543 mi²) region in the Gulf of Mexico, where the Mississippi River dumps high-nutrient runoff from its vast drainage basin, which includes the heart of U.S. agribusiness, the Midwest. The drainage of these nutrients are affecting important shrimp fishing grounds. This is equivalent to a dead zone the size of New Jersey.[7] This estimate does not include nor take into account the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from April to July 2010.

Maybe a kill zone and dead zone are different hehe.
edit on 7-12-2010 by mayabong because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:20 PM
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It's not a huge area, which is a relief, but Bureaucratic Pricks should nevertheless be closed down for their handling of it - not to mention all the sub-contractors who were also privy to this environmental f***-up.

The way they faffed around with whose fault it was for so long rather than actually fixing it really made me disgusted to call them human.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:43 PM
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most interest question is about actual status of 'ir gusher. why has whoever of research team Never attended bp well itself???



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:55 PM
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For me it puts alot in perspective.
1) How huge the agri business is in the USA that a) that much run-off (herbicides, pesticides and fertilisers not taken up by the plants or soil) can enter the GoM and b) that the Agri business can get away with it!

I have heard that the Mississipi is one of the most polluted rivers in the world (I saw a programme about a Slovenian swimmer called the River Man swim the lenth of it and it was mentioned then) and now I see to what extent. Mindblowing.
and 2) How poluted the GoM now is, coupled with seepage from the 4000 odd wells in the GoM in operation since the fifties and the Macondo well event.

The extent of this, as you all mention and it's implications are only just surfacing and it's no wonder that BP want to settle up now, albeit at a reduced rate. What's sickening is that the USA government seem to allow alot of room for negotiation immediately after a disaster when the full cost often runs into many magnitudes more down the line, you the USA taxpayer picking up the bill. Exxon Valdez cost something like 20 times the settlement.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 01:56 PM
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Originally posted by TheWill
It's not a huge area, which is a relief, but Bureaucratic Pricks should nevertheless be closed down for their handling of it - not to mention all the sub-contractors who were also privy to this environmental f***-up.

The way they faffed around with whose fault it was for so long rather than actually fixing it really made me disgusted to call them human.


I entirely agree with you. This whole things has stunk before, during and after the event with a lot of blame to go around. I just hope and pray that we all don't forgot this incident when we vote, talk to politicians and spend our money.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by TheWill
 




...The way they faffed around with whose fault it was for so long rather than actually fixing it really made me disgusted to call them human.


"Never let a crisis go to waste"

The Dutch had ships, they offered for taking care of a lot of the mess but the US idiots in charge TURNED THEM DOWN!

Remember oil is NATURAL and leaking from the sea floor all the time in various places. The National Academy’s Oil in the Sea, Inputs, Fates and Effects provides information on what happen in other oil spills.www.nap.edu...

The Ixtoc blowout is a decent comparision. (The famous Valdez Spill was a heavier crude oil in cold water and near shore.)

The literature says Gulf marshes rebound in a few months to a few years from large spills. So please keep that in mind.

Remember the Mass Media is a propaganda tool of the Government. A government run by BIG Corporations including the oil Cartel. The Cartel wants to keep the prices as high as possible so "scare stories" about evil oil are to their advantage. They KNOW modern civilization isn't going to quit using oil. Their big worry is NUCLEAR.

SEE:
CLEAN micro nuclear plants: www.nextenergynews.com...

Maybe the ATS community should consider this: A large off-grid community can be established anywhere with full power supply, now company launches mini-nuclear-power plant.



Nuclear power plants smaller than a garden shed and able to power 20000 homes

Toshiba's Micro Nuclear reactors are designed to power a single apartment building or city block, and measure a mere 20-feet by 6-feet. The 200 kilowatt reactor is fully automatic and fail-safe, and is completely self-sustaining. It uses special liquid lithium-6 reservoirs instead of traditional control rods, and can last up to 40 years, making energy for about 5 cents per kilowatt hour. Toshiba has been testing the reactors since 2005, and hopes to install its first reactor in Japan in 2008, with marketing to Europe and America in 2009. www.engadget.com...


Thorium: Nuclear Energy's Clean Little Secret


Let's review some of the key benefits of thorium. It's abundant (because we've never used any of it); it doesn't require the costly and time-intensive refining process important for uranium, and the waste it produces becomes inert in one hundred years as opposed to hundreds of thousands of years. It's nearly impossible for terrorists to manipulate for weapons production. There's more: the annual fuel cost for a one gigawatt thorium reactor is approximately six hundred times lower than that of a uranium reactor, which requires 250 times more of the raw element.


OF interest, Bill to revise law: www.ans.org...



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by Mez353
 

yes, Amicus, your post is absolutely correct: state-of-the-art agriculture always been slow bomb for environment, so, rather soon, most areas shall be completely dead along dozen of decades.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by mayabong...
Currently the most notorious dead zone is a 22,126 square kilometre (8,543 mi²) region in the Gulf of Mexico, where the Mississippi River dumps high-nutrient runoff from its vast drainage basin, which includes the heart of U.S. agribusiness, the Midwest. The drainage of these nutrients are affecting important shrimp fishing grounds. This is equivalent to a dead zone the size of New Jersey.[7] This estimate does not include nor take into account the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from April to July 2010.

Maybe a kill zone and dead zone are different hehe.
edit on 7-12-2010 by mayabong because: (no reason given)


8543 square miles compared to 80. 80 square miles is an area just under 9 miles on a side.
Almost like comparing New Jersey to DC.
edit on 12/7/2010 by abecedarian because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 



The Dutch had ships, they offered for taking care of a lot of the mess but the US idiots in charge TURNED THEM DOWN!

Prime reason to refuse support & to sink crude was Idea to conceal real scale of tragedy.

Nuclear power plants smaller than a garden shed and able to power 20000 homes Toshiba's Micro Nuclear reactors are designed to power a single apartment building or city block, and measure a mere 20-feet by 6-feet. The 200 kilowatt reactor is fully automatic and fail-safe, and is completely self-sustaining. It uses special liquid lithium-6 reservoirs instead of traditional control rods, and can last up to 40 years, making energy for about 5 cents per kilowatt hour. Toshiba has been testing the reactors since 2005, and hopes to install its first reactor in Japan in 2008, with marketing to Europe and America in 2009. www.engadget.com...

Looks purely fairy tales: no any specification was given, Just emotional article



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 



Remember the Mass Media is a propaganda tool of the Government. A government run by BIG Corporations including the oil Cartel. The Cartel wants to keep the prices as high as possible so "scare stories" about evil oil are to their advantage. They KNOW modern civilization isn't going to quit using oil.


Honestly, if 11 poor souls hadn't perished in the initial explosion, I don't think BP (and others) would have wanted this story publicized and may have tried to hide it.

And, if memory serves me right, BP is tied into the pension accounts of millions of UK retirees - those accounts lost money because of this disaster and resulting PR nightmare.

So, I'm not sure this is a "scare story" from the MSM, rather just an important story.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by abecedarian
 


It sounds like in scope this dead/kill zone is peanuts compared to the farming chemicals coming down the Mississippi river... how can that be? This past summer we were told this thing was an epic disaster? I don't understand.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 



Honestly, if 11 poor souls hadn't perished in the initial explosion, I don't think BP (and others) would have wanted this story publicized and may have tried to hide it.

Completely Agreed. gov. & bp have made/done anything to calm situation down. actually, they haven't techs to amend environment + don't forget situation which was good remarked by Mez353.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 



It sounds like in scope this dead/kill zone is peanuts compared to the farming chemicals coming down the Mississippi river... how can that be? This past summer we were told this thing was an epic disaster? I don't understand.

De-facto, GOM have had two epic Disasters: Big Petroleum & Agriculture.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by SarK0Y
 


Yes, Mez353 and Mayabong bring up very interesting ideas on this GoM crisis at large. The whole situation is becoming more depressing by the minute. The agriculture/chemical disaster happening probably deserves it's own thread as that alone is a massive and disgusting problem.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 


It can be like that because the (comparitively tiny) area affected by the oil spill was made that way in a very short period of time. The agricultural (etc.) waste coming down the river has been doing so for a long time. It had probably done a fairly large amount of damage before it was noticed at all, and it's a lot easier to plug a leaky oil well than get all the farmers across one of the longest rivers (if I'm not mistaken) on your continent to stop using pesiticides, herbicides and getting all their waste and runoff into the river.

Hell, getting the Thames (through London) to a state where it can reasonably support a limited amount of aquatic life took long enough, and by being in England it is necessarily not a particularly long river, and as much as it's a lot better than it used to be, it's still not what you'd call a pristene environment for a young tench to grow up in.



posted on Dec, 7 2010 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by TheWill
 

that clinch moment: heavy chemicals allow to maximize crop, but poorify soil up to entire devastation & pollute drinkable Waters.



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