It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Computer games 'use psychological ploys to keep players hooked'

page: 2
6
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 01:49 PM
link   
reply to post by unityemissions
 

Explanation is in your mailbox.




posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:05 PM
link   
I totally love games but the problem with me that i just can`t get addicted to it! By addiction I mean more than 4 hrs a day for a period of at least about 2 weeks. The only games that got me addicted were Sim City and Transport tycoon and both of them got discontinued! Me, personally I play, because Im addicted to adrenaline and honestly i think its a better activity than watching news, shows on the TV, I usually play Call of Duty for adrenaline and I think that makes most people addicted to a game, honestly I didnt bothered to try WoW, to much hassle just to show of you character to WHO? Games can be used for many good reasons like educating people through fun!



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by unityemissions
reply to post by Sentinel412
 


You're honestly going to compare a video game to a book? I just don't see it. Video games seem to be pretty much geared towards the lower IQ. I just can't get nearly as much intellectual stimulation from a video game as I can from a good book. I pretty much shut down when viewing television or video games. They just seem idiotic. I really don't know a better way to describe it. Sorry.


As much as I believe that mainstream gaming is largely a control device, there are some companies and programmers out there doing some interesting work. The easiest example I can find of an actively engaging and mentally stimulating game is the original Myst. Granted, it was a complete time suck, but it really required application of problem solving skills and outside the box thinking.

Of course, the popularity of cheats and online "how do I" references probably helped further establish the fact that the majority of gamers didn't/don't want to actually accomplish things, they simply want the joy of accomplishment; thus giving birth to the heightened "reward" based offerings we see today.

As an entertainment media, video games have a tremendous opportunity to tell rich stories and challenge players in unique ways. Take a moment to envision something like Anathem or Foucault's Pendulum adapted into a massive puzzle based role-playing game. It sounds ridiculous if you're limited to imagining Anathem as a Castlevania rip-off with a butt-kicking scientific monk in the lead role. But if you think of it as something else, a kind of interactive cinema with text incorporated, you can see the potential that exists.

That said, most companies are not in the improving humankind business. They are in the moving product business and TPTB have been dumbing down the population to the point where nearly every gamer out there is jonesing for a Skinner Box of their very own.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:14 PM
link   
I know many game designers from smaller and mediocre companies (I also worked with few) and I can tell you they're not part of any sort of great conspiracy (Maybe in larger companies, but smaller or mediocre companies are surely not part of any conspiracy at all.).

The essence for a game designer:
- Make the game better
- Make it much more enjoyable

Where they fails...
- Most of them lazy as hell.

Where the companies are failing...
- They're making copycats.

Maybe larger companies are using some trick to make the people addictive, who knows, but smaller and mediocre companies are usually fighting for their very own survival, because usually the entire budget of a game is the revenue of the whole company. Large corporations, such as EA or Activision are also doing cheap copycats, where we're usually getting Need For Speed 22 and the xth episode of other "bright" franchises. The media is doing the brainwash, that's for sure to buy the newest crap. But I know a lot of gamer and they're really bored of the present games. They also rather play with old games from the late 90s or early 21st century. The present games simply sucks because almost everyone is lazy (There are only few exception.).
edit on 6-12-2010 by Sentinel412 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:19 PM
link   
reply to post by RobertAntonWeishaupt
 


I enjoyed Myst as well.

I hope you realize that game came out nearly two decades ago!

I look at mmorpg's, and it makes me want to


There is nil problem solving skills involved. The gamer is practically on autopilot.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:21 PM
link   
Of course they do. If they didn't games would be boring and noone would play?



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:23 PM
link   
reply to post by unityemissions
 


20 years? Christ I'm old.

I used Myst as a touchpoint that had a relatively good chance of being recognized to illustrate me point, and have actually steered clear of gaming do much in recent years that nothing else leaps to mind at the moment. I'm sure Sentinel has some good examples.

You're right about the MMPRPG's, those are the ones that scare me.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:24 PM
link   
i agree thats why the industry(some in it) are against achievements/trophies etc.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 02:25 PM
link   
reply to post by PsykoOps
 

Actually even if they're doing, gamers are starting to be resistant. I've heard not long ago that around 80% of the gamers never play through 75-80% of the games, because they find it boring (What I can confirm.). People are already see what they're offering over and over again. No new things = boring games.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 03:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by unityemissions
reply to post by Sentinel412
 


You're honestly going to compare a video game to a book? I just don't see it. Video games seem to be pretty much geared towards the lower IQ.


What a ridiculous statement!

I'm currently in Mensa AND I am an avid video game player.

(and have been for 30+ years)

I also have a professional IT job and make over six figures a year.

Many, many, studies have shown that video games improve the mind even more than traditional types of puzzle solving such as crosswords, sudoku, etc...

Granted - I typically only play computer games - and usually only one's that require strategic or critical thinking to win - but all interactive games positively stimulate the brain through active learning.

I think most people will agree that the most egregious type of operant pavlovian conditioning - that being discussed here - is most prevalent in MMORPG's - which I just don't normally have time for - but those same MMO's often promote a lot of positive and healthy social interaction as well.

Any hobby can become an obsession or an addiction - and people simply have to monitor themselves to balance and prevent damaging their real world life as well.

(I'm no saint in this regard - I've almost had to call in sick after playing a marathon session of Minecraft or Fallout 3 before - but now I am more careful and set an alarm clock on my phone)

I think it is time to stop scapegoating videogames and to recognize their truly valid place amongst both art and literature in Human culture.

edit on 6-12-2010 by truthmagnet because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 03:10 PM
link   
reply to post by truthmagnet
 


It's not a ridiculous statement and nothing you said disproved it in the least.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 03:13 PM
link   
reply to post by UberL33t
 


Just watched the documentary Panorama I mentioned earlier. Was okay, nothing amazing, did not really scratch the surface ,but was half an hour prime time, so I suppose reached a few people. It did mention very briefly the rat experiment, quite a bit was focused on South Korea where apparently 85% have fast broadband, they seem to have a bit of the problem. You are not located in the UK are you?? So I do not think you will be able to watch onBBC I player. Someone is sure to post on youtube , if they do not with in 6 days then I will copy and post. Will probably be removed due to copyright but such is life. Also mentioned was World of War Craft and a few university students that has dropped out due to the addiction. Some interesting concepts and quite strange with the timing of both our posts.
Any way let me know if you see the doc if not will copy and post take care , regards
edit on 6-12-2010 by maythetruthbeknown because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 03:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by truthmagnet
Granted - I typically only play computer games - and usually only one's that require strategic or critical thinking to win - but all interactive games positively stimulate the brain through active learning.

This is that with I can partially agree as it can help to understand many things.


but those same MMO's often promote a lot of positive and healthy social interaction as well.

And this is that with I can't agree at all. This is just an illusion, nothing more. There is no positive or healthy social interaction in it at all. You believe in it, but it's just a well crafted illusion, nothing more. I saw many people whose ruined their life with it, while they believed they achieved anything (Yes. They achieved two things. They sliced the dragon and got nice illusion achievement in the game, while they also achieved to ruin their very own life, lost their girlfriend, lost their job... but that wasn't an illusion at all.).
edit on 6-12-2010 by Sentinel412 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 03:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by unityemissions
reply to post by truthmagnet
 


It's not a ridiculous statement and nothing you said disproved it in the least.


You stereotyped videogames as being designed for those with low IQ's - however many Mensans actively play videogames on a regular basis - in fact there is even a Mensan conference on the social impact of videogames being held in Feb. of 2011 in Austin, TX.

(which sadly it looks like I will not be able to attend - it sounds like it will be a very stimulating topic)

And - as any PC Gamer would know - many videogames (especially military or vehicle simulations) often come with text book size manuals and immense learning curves to master.

I have never met an avid fan of interactive media - in my life - who did not exhibit above average intelligence and problem solving skills.

Television, however, is a passive media device and I have met quite a few Densans who HATE videogames with a passion but who are perfectly happy to be hypnotized night after night watching Bristol Palin dance on the ol' idiot box.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 04:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by truthmagnet
You stereotyped videogames as being designed for those with low IQ's - however many Mensans actively play videogames on a regular basis - in fact there is even a Mensan conference on the social impact of videogames being held in Feb. of 2011 in Austin, TX.

Actually he stereotyped videogames because it's easy to sterotype them. Games of nowadays are designed for people of low IQ. That's a fact.

Compare a nowaday game with a Jane's USAF simulator. Or compare the level design of System Shock... or an easier example, Doom, Quake with COD, MOH 2010. The first ones are design where you must use your mind and meditate how to get from point A to point B, while you're touching points C, D, E, F, G, H... the others is a tunnel FPS (COD, MOH), while every detail objective is highlighted like a christmas tree, so even the foolest won't miss the objective... in the straight tunnel level design.

Same goes for RTS games. Compare the difficulty level of C&C with C&C4. The first was hard sometimes even for HC gamers, C&C4 is for the dumbs where you can't fail. StarCraft 1 had a damned good design, but StarCraft 2 is a joke comparing to it.

Or TPS... Prince of Persia: Sands of Time vs. Prince of Persia 2010. The first one was hard, the second is a joke even on hard difficulty.

Simulators... USAF, Descent Freespace, XWing vs... oh, wait. There are no true simulators nowadays, because it's too hard for the gamers as they should memorize more then 10 buttons. And the list can go on and on.

The games of the 21st century = dumb. That's a fact.


And - as any PC Gamer would know - many videogames (especially military or vehicle simulations) often come with text book size manuals and immense learning curves to master.

Uh-hum. Which one? Because the last good manuals which had the traits what you described was the Jane's simulators. Since that time there is not a proper manual either, just few pages of "How to play you dumb" and the "This is a unit, here is a brief description about it, dumb boy to enjoy yourself".

Right now in the present games, you're getting achievements to feel yourself important. But in the reality it's an illusion, nothing more. Here is a picture which describes the actual weight of these achievements...


edit on 6-12-2010 by Sentinel412 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 04:09 PM
link   
The solution is simple, and applies to both kids and adults. Limit your gaming time, and limit it's importance.

When I was a young adult, and single, and rooming with a computer guy, as you can imagine, all we did was eat, sleep, work, and game. It took me about 6 months to realize that there was much more to life. For others, takes way longer.


I have never met an avid fan of interactive media - in my life - who did not exhibit above average intelligence and problem solving skills.


Excellent point, and sadly, that is likely why we can so easily become addicted. We enjoy the mental challenge of overcoming the obstacles, solving the puzzles, etc. and THAT is the true addiction. The game is simply the forum for it.
edit on 6-12-2010 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 04:38 PM
link   
Hahaha, I was reading through your quoted segment, and was about to say "umm... Duh?" -- and then saw that you said that exact thing!



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 04:43 PM
link   
reply to post by Sentinel412
 


Thats not entirely true. Its not all bad. There are still good games being made e.g. 'DCS: Black Shark'. Probably the hardest hardcore sim i've ever grappled with.

Similarly not all MMPORGs are shallow e.g. EVE (as much depth as you find time for).

The good stuff still exists, its just that it exists in a much bigger pool of which is mostly rubbish. Sadly its the rubbish that usually has the marketing behind it.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 04:59 PM
link   
what is designed in the OP is a prerequisite for a decent game. Otherwise, you get bored all too easy.

GTA IV...loved it at first. Played the heck out of it online I was so good at it that when i entered a lobby, people would start leaving. Pulling down matches of something like 80-90 kills with no deaths ("good" for most was 20-30 kills). I would have people screaming into their mic's that i was cheating (there were no ways to cheat that i knew of). I was just unemployed and living off a fat severance while taking a 6 month break. And, outside of a couple of Irish dudes and this one 9 year old kid from England, was just about the best player you could find on XBox live.

then i got bored with it. Badly. I picked up COD: World at War, and have been a COD addict ever since. The storyline sucks. I don't even play it (my youngest does, he loves the story lines). I just play the online. I race to Prestige. It is the only reason i really play the game, honestly. I could find any number of FPS games for the XBox. But the fact that there is always that carrot is alluring. And that means when i plop down 60 bucks on a game, i feel better about it. Now, i spend about 60 bucks a year, because it takes a full year to get through all levels of prestige for me (i don't play THAT much...i am still a very dedicated husband, father, son, uncle, community member, and manager). But i feel that i am getting my money's worth.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 05:11 PM
link   
Everyone I have met that was "addicted" to games had nothing else to look forward to. They played them because there was not much else to do. Also, most games that give random rewards are played by a very small portion of game market. That concept is boring to most regular people. Rare and random drop rates however seem very popular in asian cultures more so than the west(as mentioned with south korea).



new topics

top topics



 
6
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join