An analysis of the DSC data in the Herrit-Jones paper

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posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by Cassius666
 


At least one editor has resigned from Bentham because the paper was routed around them. The 'peer review' was a put up job and editors who have their reputations on the line will not allow such to happen. I have reviewed many journal papers in my career and I can say that any competent chemist would never have allowed this to be published as it is.
Samples of the original paint would have to be scraped from the beams and then the sample would have to have a chain of custody. Running any sample surreptitiously is not a good plan as it casts doubt on the results. For claims such as Jones is making, multiple analyses would be necessary. The best way to do this, if one could get the samples, would be to send them to several nationally recognized analytical laboratories along with samples of the dust. Replicates from multiple labs would be more believeable than some back-door runs by someone with an axe to grind.
I believe that this is unlikely to happen even if the samples are available. It would be more facile to correctly analyze the existing samples, as previously suggested, beginning with XRD. These are common instruments and costs would be minimal. A local industrial laboratory could provide the analysis and interpretation, removing Jones from the chain and providing an unbiased analysis. If the Jones team is honest about wanting to characterize the red chips, they could get donations from their supporters to do this. Results suggesting thermite would then instigate further analyses and more investigation. Jones would be a hero for bringing this forward and get all the limelight that he desires.
edit on 1/6/2011 by pteridine because: spelling correction




posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 12:12 PM
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Given the history of repercussion against people who spoke out against the official conspiracy theory the reason why some scientists retired over the paper is a reason for debate in itself.

It is known what paint was used to coat the tower. An pure sample might not yield the same result as a tainted sample, but at the very least we can see if it is similiar. The curve of protective paint should look distinctively different than say the curve of black powder.
edit on 6-1-2011 by Cassius666 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by Cassius666
 


Comparison DSC analyses are more difficult and would not provide the information that the XRD would. The easiest alternative is XRD and better characterization of his existing samples. That way there will be no doubt as to what is being analyzed as there was with the paint sample in Jones paper.



posted on Jan, 6 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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Can from a DSC reading be determined if an material is explosive? If I put black powder into a dsc machine, does the curve tell me if the material is explosive?



posted on Jan, 8 2011 @ 12:36 PM
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posted on Jan, 10 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by Cassius666
 


I have seen a DSC of black powder in a sealed ampule and the trace did not exhibit any characteristics that would suggest an explosive nature. An open boat DSC of a known explosive showed the electronic noise associated with sudden sample loss. I didn't run either of these and would have to look through the literature to find them.



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 09:32 AM
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What is the DSC curve consistent with?



posted on Jan, 14 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by Cassius666
What is the DSC curve consistent with?


It is consistent with an exotherm. In air, a DSC exotherm of a carbonaceous material is likely combustion.

DSC traces are not based on intrinsic properties of the analyte. They are dependent on the conditions of analysis. An example of intrinsic properties would be an IR absorbtion spectrum. Functional groups [such as
-OH, C=O, -CH3, -NO2, etc.) always absorb in the same regions and this allows the analyst to make conclusions as to the functional groups present in the sample.
An example of extrinsic properties would be a gas chromatogram. The trace depends on column packing or coating, column diameter and length, flow rate, gas, detector type, temperature ramp, injection size, and solvent. Looking at an IR, one can make some immediate conclusions about the sample. Looking at a GC, one may be able to say that there are some minimum number of components, and that the early large peak is most likely solvent containing the analyte, but that is about it. DSC is the same way. The shape of the traces depend on the variables of analysis.



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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Originally posted by bsbray11
Spelling is nothing compared to chemistry or the mechanics of military-grade energetic materials.


Is this how low you have stooped? Your entire argument is based on an irrelevant typo?


What is the point in social commentary on technical issues, when you could just do the technical work and make your commentary something that can be verified?


As pteridine says, the experiment needs to be run under argon, or it is meaningless. By what stretch of the imagination is this an unverified point? If you don't understand the significance, go to school.





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