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Are we creating new fungi?

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posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 04:17 PM
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I heard on the radio today that a previously unknown fungus has been discovered that can consume both the plastic AND metal of your CD's. Apparently, this is a rare phenomenon. My question is, did this fungus exist before and we're just becoming aware of it or did it evolve from another fungi? Yet again, by creating a new product, did we create an enviroment for a NEW fungus?




posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 09:16 PM
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It could be a diversion from the flesh-eating viruses we know, living in some kind of human-made environ, perhaps a pipe? Thus, it adapted to eating away at the plastic and metal... :/



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 11:03 PM
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im going to regretfully call BS on this one until i see a link.



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 11:15 PM
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yeah, i'm not really buying into this until i see proof. but, if this does exist, and a controlled version can be created, it would really help landfill problems around the world.



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 11:23 PM
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No link,
but I saw something on this several years ago on the news. If I remember right it was only found in labs at the time, I want to say at Cal. Remember seeing the CDs with the metal partially gone. Been so long ago, dont remember any specifics.
-dnnx



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 11:35 PM
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www.space.com...

i thought i remembered something about this in the space stations... it not the bacteria or fungus that destroys the metal or plastic, but its a product of their metabolism. skin cells and other microscopic human parts go to these surfaces, get eaten by the bacteria or fungus, that creates organic acids, which then corrode whatever surface they were on.



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 11:40 PM
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I wouldn't want that in my local landfill, it would eat the dozers and we would just have to keep heaping.



posted on Jul, 3 2004 @ 09:43 AM
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This fungi could actually be used for good, quite well, actually... But how fast does it destroy the metal and plastic and what is its reproductive rate? Is it worth the time and money?



posted on Jul, 3 2004 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by forsakenwayfarer
im going to regretfully call BS on this one until i see a link.


It was on the Edge, Toronto radio station, a show called "the ongoing history of new music." Their site is down, when it is up I'll track it down.



posted on Jul, 3 2004 @ 09:53 AM
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Originally posted by intrepid
My question is, did this fungus exist before and we're just becoming aware of it or did it evolve from another fungi? Yet again, by creating a new product, did we create an enviroment for a NEW fungus?


We mutatue bacteria everyday by indescriminat use of antibiotics. Combined with people who don't take all of thier percriptions, we create new fun and deadly variant that are resistand to antibiotics. Same goes with anti-fungals.

Could be a the doings of the RIAA to force us to buy more CD's



posted on Jul, 3 2004 @ 09:27 PM
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Originally posted by FredT
.....
Could be a the doings of the RIAA to force us to buy more CD's


I think you have found out their diabolical plan. They better watch out now....



posted on Jul, 5 2004 @ 09:58 PM
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Once again reality is stranger than fiction

www.microbe.org...

enjoy



posted on Jul, 5 2004 @ 10:05 PM
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Great, it is hard enough making sure my computer doesn't get a virus, now I have to worry about it getting a fungus.

I would have to say this sounds like BS. It would be one thing if a fungus could be created to eat either the plastic or the metal, but not likely both.



posted on Jul, 5 2004 @ 10:20 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
www.space.com...

i thought i remembered something about this in the space stations... it not the bacteria or fungus that destroys the metal or plastic, but its a product of their metabolism. skin cells and other microscopic human parts go to these surfaces, get eaten by the bacteria or fungus, that creates organic acids, which then corrode whatever surface they were on.


Great - so basically this fungus was brought back from space and its "waste products" are corosive acids that can destroy plastic, metal and glass!? I wonder if they contained it or if it got out and will one day be wide spread. In fact, I wonder if it has previously been brought to earth by solar winds and if it can survive and thrive in our atmosphere?

Actually, with all the plastic and metal we use on a daily basis this could be a very effective weapon! Imagine if they could speed up their metabolism and make them breed profuesly so that within minutes they could destroy your computer, phone, printer, fax machine, car, television, microwave, you name it!



posted on Jul, 6 2004 @ 12:22 PM
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This is really ancient information!

As far back as 1990,
fungus was known to eat diskettes in SouthEast Asia.
Special dry-boxes were constructed to hold diskettes.

Diligent pc operators in countries like Indonesia and Thailand
copied diskettes monthly to avoid losing data.

Perhaps the rest of the world,
living in drier climates just never disovered this.

Until 2001, at least.
That is when the BBC ran the story in their Sci-Tech section.
From Fungus 'eats' CDs:

A geologist at the Museum of Natural History in Madrid discovered the fungus, which belongs to the common Geotrichum family, on CDs brought back from the central American state of Belize.

Even though this fungus widespread it could only develop on a CD in high humidity and high temperature, which is not the case most of the time

The fungus had attacked the outer edge of the disc, consuming plastic and even aluminium. It rendered the CD unplayable.


Funny how those simple little things just don't get discussed internationally.


Originally posted by greenkoolaid
I would have to say this sounds like BS. It would be one thing if a fungus could be created to eat either the plastic or the metal, but not likely both.



posted on Jul, 6 2004 @ 10:43 PM
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OK Teknik - so I guess you answered one of my questions - it can survive and thrive in our atmosphere. And I guess it has been here on earth for a few years. So what about the idea that this can be a great weapon against highly developed countries? Imagine unleasing this among companies that produce CD's and it infecting our computers, steros, cars, etc. Wouldn't it be a very creative terrorist's tool?



posted on Jul, 6 2004 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by badkitty
So what about the idea that this can be a great weapon against highly developed countries?

Evolution might cause this naturally, but it might take a while. (decades)

No such weapon would be necessary.

'Highly developed countries' historically self-destruct,
particularly after they have 'defeated' their worst adveraries.



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