What to do when you only buy two tires – not four

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posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 08:32 PM
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Normally you should buy four tires at a time for an automobile but once in awhile you may find a situation where you’re only buying two. I recently found myself in that situation. The mechanic at the dealership told me to put the front tires to the rear and put the new tires on the front. It made sense when he said it but, as it turns out, it’s not the correct thing to do.

When replacing only two tires, the correct thing to do is put the new tires on the rear of the car with the older tires on the front of the car – it prevents fish-tailing during a rain storm. I discovered that from a Michelin advertisement sitting on the counter of the place where I bought the tires. Just thought I’d pass it on.




posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 08:40 PM
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acually, thats only if you drive front wheel drive. Prevents over steer. Most people think the good one should be on the front and that is just not the case.



posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 09:01 PM
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I can't say whether it's a suggestion only for front wheel drive cars - the advertisement certainly didn't say anything about that situation...and if you think about it, if you've got bald tires on the rear of the car, and the rear of the car starts to hydroplane, it will indeed fishtail.



posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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It can actually be a catch 22 here
If you put the worn tires on the back and the new ones on the front, you can fishtail in the rain obviously, moreso if you have a rearwheel drive vehicle. A front wheel drive vehicle will have better control in the rain.
But from steering the new tires will soon be just as worn. I suppose then you can buy new tires again.



posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 09:24 PM
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you should most likely put them on the wheels that carry the drive. If its 4wd, well, should have gotten 4. Though I would guess you would place them based on the tread of the other 2.

I can't wait to spend 900 for 4 new tires



posted on Dec, 4 2010 @ 08:42 AM
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Originally posted by Myendica
you should most likely put them on the wheels that carry the drive. If its 4wd, well, should have gotten 4. Though I would guess you would place them based on the tread of the other 2.

I can't wait to spend 900 for 4 new tires


I just did that. It sucks spending that much, but once the new tires are on the vehicle, wow, what a difference. In my case, after 2 flats in 2 weeks, and then hit with a dump of snow, it feels so good. The dealer suggested just 2, but I wasn't going to take chances, I got 4 tough aggressive mud/snow tires, on a 2 wheel drive pickup truck, and it was worth every penny for the peace of mind. Especially since the snow will be here for months now.

My idea of what to do when you only buy 2 tires, is to save, beg, or borrow for the other 2 matching tires.



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 01:40 PM
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Put the new tires on the drive wheels. That gives you the most control.



posted on Dec, 10 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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If you have a front wheel drive car that is where the new tires should go.

They will be both steering and propelling the car.

A ear wheel drive car should have the new tires on the rear.

If you ever have a rear tire blow out on a rear drive vehicle you will know why the best tires should be in the rear.

I had a rear tire blow from running over something and it spun my car around in the other direction.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 12:50 AM
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In the likely case that you have a front-wheel drive car (most likely unless it's a performance car or a BMW), the new tires go in the front. If your front tires start slipping, you will understeer into the wall (outside of the turn). Fishtailing is nowhere near as bad as your fronts slipping. In fact, professional drivers will use left-foot trail braking to put weight on the front tires in turns and slide the rear around.

As for a RWD car, it's questionable to some degree - your front wheels are still the turning wheels. Again, if you know what you are doing enough to prevent snap over-steer, the lose rear isn't necessarily a problem.



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 07:15 PM
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If the vehicle is all wheel drive you should replace all four at the same time or damage to the drive line could result. If not, as others have stated, I prefer the best tires in front. Seventy precent of brakeing power is at the front wheels, plus steering.



posted on Dec, 24 2010 @ 03:24 AM
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Every time you have to change your tires change and replace all 4 out that way your car rides and performs better plus is more fuel efficient as all tires will be completely level.





 
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