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Arse or Ass The Debate !

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posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:16 PM
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UK. "ARSE"
USA "ASS"

I want to see a real debate on really which one should be chosen as the right term for "vulgar buttock."

I feel confused, someone please enlighten me.

edit on 29-11-2010 by wiredamerican because: ootles and eetles




posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:21 PM
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reply to post by wiredamerican
 


ugh...your an ASS!




posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by wiredamerican
 


Arse just feels like a polite way to say ASS!! lol



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:40 PM
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I think it depends on what you want to say: Asshat is a much better insult than arsehat, for example



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:43 PM
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Either one, they're both English. I kind of like to use the word "ass" myself. I've heard Canadians both French speaking and English speaking use "arse." One French lady I know, laughs, when she says the word "arse." I think people say "arse" if they want to be polite. Nothing wrong with being polite. I'd use which ever one I felt most comfortable with.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:49 PM
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Links?



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:49 PM
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Originally posted by suigeneris
reply to post by wiredamerican
 


Arse just feels like a polite way to say ASS!! lol


Agreed. It's censor-proof...




posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:51 PM
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Arse...

Ass just makes me think of a donkey.

It's not polite.. lol.. adding the word Hole to the end of either Arse or Ass, and the former, to me, has more sinister intent...

Won't matter much longer anyway, all the cool kids in Australia say Ass now, because they are arses...




posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by wiredamerican
 
USA/Modern English = Add
Britain/Old English = Arse



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by wiredamerican
 


Truthfully I can't think of anyone I know that actually pronounces the R in arse.
It's more down to the difference in how we pronounce the letter A



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 10:07 PM
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Like any good $h!t talking scenario, it's all in the context.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 10:15 PM
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hath thou wipeth thine arseloch?



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by wiredamerican
 


We in the land of Oz say arse the whole bit comes after.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 09:52 AM
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T. T. I. W. W. P.




posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by MzMorbid
 


Asshat is a very confusing word. Exactly how do you pronounce this?

To me, it would be pronounced ASH - AT.

I don't think that's correct though, but that's how it reads to me.

I imagine one is supposed to think ASS HAT.

But that really makes no sense. What kind of an insult is that? Calling someone a hat? A hat would not stay on an ass anyway.

Side note - I'm an American and I could never understand why Britons insulted each other by calling them a "sod". Sod = expensive pre grown grass which is used in landscaping. When you hear "sod" in the US - it's in reference to grass. Just a head's up for travelers.
(I do understand what the Brits mean by this now
)



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by wiredamerican
 


I prefer arse since it's not what we American's usually say



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 05:25 PM
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Well when I call someone an arse I don't generally want to compare them to a donkey
...so drop that second S and give me my R and E back.

It's arse.



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 05:46 PM
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its ass
arse is some british slang, bloody fish and crisps



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by giuve424
 


Actually the spelling of arse was around before ass.

In the sense of referring to the 'back door' at least.

edit on 1-12-2010 by StevenDye because: (no reason given)


There was an isolated occurrence of the ass spelling in Britain in 1860, though it otherwise appears to be as recent perhaps as the 1930s, well after the selling arse was fully fledged.

So by age alone, arse wins

edit on 1-12-2010 by StevenDye because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 05:59 PM
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Arse.

I would be ridiculed if I ever called anyone an ass or an asshole and considered a bit of a prick if I'm to be honest.



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