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CIA implanted electrodes in brains of unsuspecting soldiers, suit alleges

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posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 03:09 PM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock
Project Blue Beam is a highly speculative thought to use holographs/holograms to fool people into believing an alien invasion or the coming of the antichrist.

I would be shocked if there are people who actually think such would work at this point.

Here is 'Project Blue Beam' at work...


Actually, no. There are no free-standing free air holograms. That is a rear projection on saran wrap technique pushed by a company called Museon (sp?). They make a clear projection screen called eyeliner. It's got diddly to do with holography, although they try to claim that the word can mean whatever they choose for it to mean, so if they want to call it that, that's what it is.

OTOH, there is a technology that can project sound to a remote point using lasers that was a part of a free-standing hologram research project that didn't cut it. It's impressive and weird looking, like a talking ball of fire with smoke coming out of it, and the voice is distorted and oddball. A couple of units were fielded to the 10th SF in Germany for use in the first Gulf War, but Bush pere refused to use it.




posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by andy1033

They do this without wires or chips, they can just use your freq and that is a fact. I have lived with this stuff, so i should know alittle about what they can and cannot do.



I know several guys that say the same, and they're on meds.

One guy says he's controlled by ninjas that hide in the trees. Another one hears Satan telling him what to do out of the sink drain, which is sort of creepy. But it's not real, although it seems to be to them, when it's happening.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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It reminds me of the floride thing also..interesting story .www.rense.com...
Makes me feel like we are all so blind and dumb

"When the Nazis, under Hitler, decided to go into Poland ... the German General Staff and the Russian General Staff exchanged scientific and military ideas, plans and personnel and the scheme of mass control through water medication was seized upon by the Russian Communists because it fitted ideally into their plan to communise the world ...

"I say this in all earnestness and sincerity of a scientist who has spent nearly 20 years research into the chemistry, Bo-chemistry, physiology and pathology and pathology of fluorine: any person who drinks artificially fluorinated water for a period of one year or more will never again be the same person, mentally or physically."



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 03:18 PM
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I just posted this to my blog, and came to see if it was on ATS yet.
Good work.

This is just another brick in the wall of proof that the CIA, by nature, will use fuzzy forms of morality in which the ends can justify the means.

They are an evil agency founded by evil people (Nazi's). Their time never was, so it cannot be said to have passed. They need to be dissolved ex post haste, and it members put under the same kind of review we would have given the Nazi's while vetting them (except this time, actually do the job).



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
Actually, no. There are no free-standing free air holograms. That is a rear projection on saran wrap technique pushed by a company called Museon (sp?). They make a clear projection screen called eyeliner. It's got diddly to do with holography, although they try to claim that the word can mean whatever they choose for it to mean, so if they want to call it that, that's what it is.

OTOH, there is a technology that can project sound to a remote point using lasers that was a part of a free-standing hologram research project that didn't cut it. It's impressive and weird looking, like a talking ball of fire with smoke coming out of it, and the voice is distorted and oddball. A couple of units were fielded to the 10th SF in Germany for use in the first Gulf War, but Bush pere refused to use it.


I never stipulated the tech but referred to it as a speculative theory. Way to posture, Bedlam...but please do not misrepresent my expressions...



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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None of this is surprising. I know that cell phones operate on the same frequency as our brains, so that would corroborate the mind control stuff.

I think control is administered through many methods though (Food, Microwaves, Education, Social/Political, Religious, Money, etc.). After 12 or more methods combined, most people don't stand a chance to be independent and strong.

When we use our phone, we say a lot of information, and text a lot of information. Also when we want to update our life, we go to facebook (which is owned by the CIA). So even if were stronger than mind control, the very maze through which we wander was already rigged from the start.

It's hard to outsmart an organization who has more info on you than you have on yourself. I mean think about it, were not even allowed to look at our own medical records on our own to look at our own medical history. I think the CIA has all the info and so by the numbers they can artificially stack everything in their favor.

I suggest tricking them, sending false signals/updates to keep them off track. Also I have a theory about medical records, I bet that if medical records were public, that we would start to notice really odd patterns. For example we might notice that people that live within 2 blocks of a cell phone tower has a higher chance of cancer, etc. These are just hypothetical but I hope I am making sense.

In any case we need to get up to date on technologies that are available which could be used to control us. If we know about the control it has a lot less power (like the devil speaking from the drain, wow that's creepy).

Peace, Love, and Harmony yo!



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock
I never stipulated the tech but referred to it as a speculative theory. Way to posture, Bedlam...but please do not misrepresent my expressions...


What posturing? You unequivocally stated it was a hologram and "here is project blue beam". Seemed like you were being more than speculative.

The truth is, there ISN'T any way to do a free standing hologram. God knows it's been tried enough. You can do a real-image hologram, but it requires an illuminating laser and a piece of film with the appropriate interference pattern the size of the thing you're projecting. With that in hand, you can cause an image to be projected in front of the film. But it's still got its limits - it doesn't obscure back surfaces, for example, nor will it produce specular reflections, or a host of other requirements you normally see in the requirement list for "holograms". And if you go off-axis, it becomes distorted and fades.

The RFQ's for these things are written by someone who's watched too many Star Wars movies.

edit: Nope, you did say it was speculative, my bad, and perhaps you were being tongue in cheek saying "here is blue beam at work". It's one of my hot buttons - I first got to work on one of the projects in a real peripheral role as a yoot. We bid it later as a second tier to someone, still couldn't get it to work.
edit on 29-11-2010 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 04:12 PM
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Originally posted by Section69
None of this is surprising. I know that cell phones operate on the same frequency as our brains, so that would corroborate the mind control stuff.


well, cell phones operate at different frequencies depending on what service it is. CDMA and GSM are fairly different. But at any rate, your brain doesn't operate anywhere near 800MHz-1900MHz, so the statement's wrong either way.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Bedlam

Originally posted by Section69
None of this is surprising. I know that cell phones operate on the same frequency as our brains, so that would corroborate the mind control stuff.


well, cell phones operate at different frequencies depending on what service it is. CDMA and GSM are fairly different. But at any rate, your brain doesn't operate anywhere near 800MHz-1900MHz, so the statement's wrong either way.


This is correct. If one wants to understand brain frequencies better, look up Schumann Frequencies. All you need to know, as a primer, right there.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
This is correct. If one wants to understand brain frequencies better, look up Schumann Frequencies. All you need to know, as a primer, right there.


Only if your .'s a big hollow waveguide.

99.9% of what you read about Schumann's resonance on the net is unadulterated poo. If the site's not about waveguides and calculating resonances of sphere-in-sphere configurations, it's not 'reality based'. Seriously, Schumann and your . have nothing to do with each other, unless you're in fields III and it's on the final as a bonus question.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


I am not joking, i am monitored 24/7 and i am on no meds, and i am in london. I openly speak about it and it is accepted fact in my life.

I found out that in 1992 that they used electroinc mind control in schools, in london. This is before internet. They used this to totally humilate my life fact and the people i went to school with know this.

So i am not joking.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 06:07 PM
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On the electrodes --

The autobiography of Dr. John Lilly has some info about this. And that was a LONG time ago he was doing that. He was one of the guys who came up with it. Electrode wires so thin they blended into hair, and could be affected to impact specific areas of the brain (potentially affecting decisions, emotions, etc.). The government made no secret of basically taking his research and telling him he was no longer cleared to be involved with its direct continuance, he talks about that in the book.

That research is what led him to dolphins, for which he's pretty famous. They have bigger brains, so neural research was perfect on them. Unfortunately after working with them he decided that they are at least as sentient as we are, and so refused to go down that road any further.

Anyway, bearing in mind that sound is a vibration and in intensified form can be quite physical (as any rapper car going by makes obvious), and bearing in mind that we now have the open tech in marketing to project sound to high specific, tiny location points (such as... in someone's ....) I think the whole hardwired concept is probably old tech. I'm sure things are vastly improved by this time.

RC



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by RedCairo
Anyway, bearing in mind that sound is a vibration and in intensified form can be quite physical (as any rapper car going by makes obvious), and bearing in mind that we now have the open tech in marketing to project sound to high specific, tiny location points (such as... in someone's ....) I think the whole hardwired concept is probably old tech. I'm sure things are vastly improved by this time.

RC


Actually, that's one of the ways you really CAN stimulate a small area in someone's ..

The problems are many, though. One, you can't do it very well/at all at a distance. Two, even with really high frequency transducers in contact with the ., it's rough to pinpoint a tiny spot: you are caught between dispersion and dissipation at the high end where you might get something done, and having too large a spot size at the lower end where you can deliver some power on target.

edit:
Three, it tends to kill neurons, so it's not so good in the long run, even if you can make it work in the short run.
edit on 29-11-2010 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
edit:
Three, it tends to kill neurons, so it's not so good in the long run, even if you can make it work in the short run.
edit on 29-11-2010 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)


Are you going to provide links for your assertions or just maintain the adverse quo?

Hint - I am asking for a link(s) to several of your posts since you have decided to present yourself as an indirect dissuasion to the topic...



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


Which ones? For most you have to have some knowledge of the underlying physics, at which point it's obvious. Is there a pre-chewed website with it for you, generally not. I can probably find bits and pieces and stitch them together for you, if someone's got enough websites with basic physics of ultrasonic waves up.

The assertion "it doesn't work well at a distance" is based on: trying similar things, and understanding that the air/fluid boundary you present to air propagating ultrasonics causes a somewhat random reflection of the sound. You will get primarily reflections, with some surface wave propagation, and a very small amount of conduction into the skin, at which point you'll hit another impedance transition caused by the skull, same issues, and then another impedance transition into the brain, same issues. So you have tranducer-air, air-skin, skin-skull, skull-brain impedance steps, all of which will cause scattering and reflections.

If you think about it a while, you might also realize that you can't do it with one source - it'll take a group of transducers around the subject, all coordinated, and that's going to be a bear/impossible given the transitions. This is why you don't see people doing ultrasonic scans on people's innards from across the room. The gel they use gives you impedance matching between the transducer and the skin, which is used in contact to avoid air-skin scattering.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 07:08 PM
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Ok - here's a very oversimplified acoustic waves 101 discussion of reflections from impedance transitions. The examples (until the end of the document) are all simplified to ignore boundary waves and dissipation in the media.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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And here's a link referring to Szabo's equation for frequency related dissipation. They even use human tissue examples.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 07:22 PM
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A link showing a relationship to focused ultrasound and neuron damage.

Although really, it ought to be obvious. Ultrasonics interact with tissue by causing shear, cavitation, and heating. That's what's "stimulating" the neurons to fire, not the gentle licks of a unicorn. It's irritating to the neurons, so they fire off. Or quit firing.

Over time, it also causes synaptic damage to the axonal end-terminals, no one knows why, but it'll shake them apart. It's one reason you don't use an ultrasonic stimulator over your spine.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 07:30 PM
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Let's see, trying to hit all my claims here - I'm hoping that it'll be unnecessary to state that the higher the frequency, the smaller the wavelength for ultrasonics as for anything else. And that to get a good focus with sound, you have to use a wavelength that's about half the length of the focal spot diameter you'd like to get. And to probe very small areas of the brain, even if you can work around the scattering issues (you can, if you're in contact, and it's really really TOUGH) and still maintain a focus using multiple emitters, the issue of dissipation (remember Szabo?) rears its ugly .. The higher the frequency, the more your tissues convert the beam into heat, cavitation, and shear. So it doesn't penetrate. So the frequencies you'd like to use to get a tight focus don't work so well for actually getting to structures in the brain, without burning the intervening tissue to a crisp.

That said, you'll recall my first post in the ultrasonics group here was that "this is one of the few things you can actually make work, if not that well" or something to that end. Because it is. It's just not great, and isn't good for you over the long term. DARPA's been diddling around with this for a while, only the issues are just what I've said. Poor resolution/aim due to the frequency limitations and number of interface boundaries is THE biggy. See also "Dr William Tyler", Arizona State.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 08:36 PM
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I will read through your links in a bit. However, I wanted to chime in to point out that, regardless of the phooey on the web, Schumann Frequencies have everything to do with the human brain. Our brain waves are attuned to it.

Now, some of the more far flung things, i cannot attest to...such as mind control. But if we are talking about brain waves, the connection with Schumann frequencies cannot be ignored.

This isn't physics. It is biology.



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