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Sirius

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posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 11:13 PM
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Anyone else noticing that Sirius seems to be blinking a lot? I'm not implying anything here but rather just trying to see if anyone is noticing this, or if for whatever reason for the last few nights my eyes have constantly honed in on Sirius as "abnormal" to the rest of the stars in the night sky.




posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 11:16 PM
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I would agree with you. I'm catching a repeating signal...

..-. --- .-. - -.-- / - .-- ---



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 11:26 PM
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i've been watching sirius for many years now....it's always been very mystifying,

but i don't think much has changed in the past 15 years,

Is it possible with the recent increase in volcanic activity, that the extra particulates in the sky are causing it to look /refract differently?

on a side note...on wikisky.org, Sirius is blocked out if u try to zoom in, while other stars (like Rigel) are not....



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 11:27 PM
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Originally posted by Sly1one
Anyone else noticing that Sirius seems to be blinking a lot? I'm not implying anything here but rather just trying to see if anyone is noticing this, or if for whatever reason for the last few nights my eyes have constantly honed in on Sirius as "abnormal" to the rest of the stars in the night sky.


I was out last night looking at it through binoculars thinking the same thing, it was blinking a lot and rapidly changing intense colors too.. Weird.



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 11:41 PM
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We already had a thread discussing this, it is natural.



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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I'm really happy you posted this. I was on my way home tonight and the blinking of Sirius actually caught my attention. It never seemed so flashy before. I'm not saying its abnormal, but just something I noticed.



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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Originally posted by Segador
We already had a thread discussing this, it is natural.


I assumed as much but what I don't understand is why in particular it seems to be Sirius mostly. I have looked around at several other stars in the sky just as bright that don't seem to be blinking, flickering, what ever you want to call it, near as much.

It was an observation I made not because I was looking at Sirius or looking for it, but it stood out to me like a sore thumb. The only other star that seems to blink similarly is Procyon.

If its natural then why are none of the other bright stars appearing in this manner?



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 01:10 AM
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i thought sirius was in daylight now.....not sure
but what was the star below (east of ) orion last night?...friday night in dallas....it's not there tonite....and it was the britest by far.
even turning colors now and then....i guess maybe the sun off a geostationary sattellite



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 02:52 AM
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reply to post by GBP/JPY
 


ufo's hide amongst the stars pretending to be part of the night sky! where is the best place to hide? right in front of your face!

we are a species that denies things to the very end so any intelligent species will know that another person will come away and explain them away! inside the box thinkers are the governments best friend!!



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 02:54 AM
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I swear the mask themselves as planes, with blinking lights.

Sirius blinks some crazy colors (if it's the star I'm thinking of.) Probably just some swamp gas...



Originally posted by metalholic
reply to post by GBP/JPY
 


ufo's hide amongst the stars pretending to be part of the night sky! where is the best place to hide? right in front of your face!

we are a species that denies things to the very end so any intelligent species will know that another person will come away and explain them away! inside the box thinkers are the governments best friend!!



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 07:41 AM
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Sirius has always seemed to blink variably, it's an extremely strange star, and you can't view it properly using any space agency image source like NASA or ESA either which makes it even more questionable... for example, on google earth and the microsoft wwt, Sirius has a big yellow/orange 'blob' over it... but why? Someone a while ago said it's because it's too bright for the telescope or something similar, but that doesn't even sound plausible imo with the precise technology they have in their telescopes. Hehe I bet there's at least 1 clearly habitable planet around it or something ;-)

Saw it for a while last night, as it rises through the sky in the UK around midnight onwards atm for a pretty clear view (when there's no chem-trails or cloud coverage - which there's been a lot of both lately except for clear night a few days ago and last night), but just keep your eye on that star as it's definitely very mysterious!


There's also another star to the South West-ish that blinks similar, almost directly opposite Sirius, but in the same observable sky - I'll have to find out what star this is and keep an eye on that too, as the blinking and colour changing of stars like Sirius has always boggled me


If anyone can find some close hi quality pictures of Sirius that would be amazing!! The only ones I can find online are a bit crap lol



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by VirtualParadise
Sirius has always seemed to blink variably, it's an extremely strange star, and you can't view it properly using any space agency image source like NASA or ESA either which makes it even more questionable... for example, on google earth and the microsoft wwt, Sirius has a big yellow/orange 'blob' over it... but why? Someone a while ago said it's because it's too bright for the telescope or something similar, but that doesn't even sound plausible imo with the precise technology they have in their telescopes. Hehe I bet there's at least 1 clearly habitable planet around it or something ;-)

Saw it for a while last night, as it rises through the sky in the UK around midnight onwards atm for a pretty clear view (when there's no chem-trails or cloud coverage - which there's been a lot of both lately except for clear night a few days ago and last night), but just keep your eye on that star as it's definitely very mysterious!


There's also another star to the South West-ish that blinks similar, almost directly opposite Sirius, but in the same observable sky - I'll have to find out what star this is and keep an eye on that too, as the blinking and colour changing of stars like Sirius has always boggled me


If anyone can find some close hi quality pictures of Sirius that would be amazing!! The only ones I can find online are a bit crap lol


The other star I think you are referring to that also blinks is "Procyon". Its in the same observable sky to the west of Sirius.



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 11:19 AM
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The blinking & twinkling is caused by the Earth's atmosphere. It is not a property of the star itself. Unstable air refracts the light. This lensing causes causes fluctuation in brightness and (thanks to something called "chromatic abberation") color. The main advantage of the Hubble telescope is not how much it magnifies things - Many telescopes on Earth have higher resolution. Rather it is the fact that, in space, it doesn't have to look through unstable air.

When we look across a hot parking lot, we can see the air shimmering. In fact, the air in every direction is shimmering, but usually the effect is too small to see. Objects who's shape we can resolve (such as the Moon and planets) don't show this rippling unless we look through a telescope. Stars, on the other hand, are so far away that they are effectively point-sources, and thus show the refraction. This is why we tend to notice twinkling more with stars than with planets (Somebody earlier mentioned that Betelguese didn't seem to be twinkling as much as Sirius. This was a good observation. Although Betelgeuse is much further away than Sirius, it is physically so large that its disk is resolvable with large telescopes. Thus it is less vulnerable to refraction than closer stars).

More heat causes more shimmer (literally, more refraction) and thus more dramatic twinkling. Also, the more air the light passes through, the greater the twinkling effect. Thus, when a star is low to the horizon (such as when it's rising or setting, or - like Sirius - is far south when viewed from northern latitudes) it twinkles more dramatically because it is travelling through dozens of miles of thick air.

Hope this helps.



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 11:28 AM
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Originally posted by Saint Exupery
The blinking & twinkling is caused by the Earth's atmosphere. It is not a property of the star itself. Unstable air refracts the light. This lensing causes causes fluctuation in brightness and (thanks to something called "chromatic abberation") color. The main advantage of the Hubble telescope is not how much it magnifies things - Many telescopes on Earth have higher resolution. Rather it is the fact that, in space, it doesn't have to look through unstable air.

When we look across a hot parking lot, we can see the air shimmering. In fact, the air in every direction is shimmering, but usually the effect is too small to see. Objects who's shape we can resolve (such as the Moon and planets) don't show this rippling unless we look through a telescope. Stars, on the other hand, are so far away that they are effectively point-sources, and thus show the refraction. This is why we tend to notice twinkling more with stars than with planets (Somebody earlier mentioned that Betelguese didn't seem to be twinkling as much as Sirius. This was a good observation. Although Betelgeuse is much further away than Sirius, it is physically so large that its disk is resolvable with large telescopes. Thus it is less vulnerable to refraction than closer stars).

More heat causes more shimmer (literally, more refraction) and thus more dramatic twinkling. Also, the more air the light passes through, the greater the twinkling effect. Thus, when a star is low to the horizon (such as when it's rising or setting, or - like Sirius - is far south when viewed from northern latitudes) it twinkles more dramatically because it is travelling through dozens of miles of thick air.

Hope this helps.


Actually this helps a great deal!

I knew most all the information already that you posted however I was unaware of the more dramatic twinkling when low toward the horizon, which makes complete sense to me now as every time I saw Sirius twinkling a lot it was low on the horizon! That helps me confirm the phenomena of the atmosphere and air effecting start twinkling.

I was confused why it seemed to be only Sirius twinkling as much and well now I have a believable explanation.

Thanks



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Arrowmancer
 



would agree with you. I'm catching a repeating signal...

..-. --- .-. - -.-- / - .-- ---


Ha! "HitchHiker's Guide to the Galaxy"!!!!



(Or else, the other dozen or so [equally silly, and fictional] references???)



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 11:53 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Hitchiker's reference. Figured more people would have been entertained by it! I U2U'd the OP immediately after posting as a disclaimer that I wasn't trying to mess with his thread but saw an opportunity for good humor. Good catch, sir!



posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 08:44 PM
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Stars twinkly due to the atmosphere. Probably a lot of particles, moisture, and/or turbulence in your area. It seems to me that the twinkling is most noticable in brighter stars. Also, the lower the star is to the horizon, the more it will twinkle or have color distortion due to the fact that you are looking through more atmosphere when objects are lower in the sky.




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