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New Coast Guard port rules

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posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 03:31 PM
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According to the new port rules, the Coast Guard is going to board EVERY single foreign ship that docks here. Also, there are a host of other compliances that every ship must face. The CG has already turned away 3 ships. My question is... Does the CG have the manpower to enforce regulations as strict as these? are they feasible? are the rules going to cause delays in products, etc. getting to consumers?

a small article stating some of the ruels:
www.kfmb.com...




posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by Trojanex
According to the new port rules, the Coast Guard is going to board EVERY single foreign ship that docks here. Also, there are a host of other compliances that every ship must face. The CG has already turned away 3 ships. My question is... Does the CG have the manpower to enforce regulations as strict as these? are they feasible? are the rules going to cause delays in products, etc. getting to consumers?

a small article stating some of the ruels:
www.kfmb.com...


Do they have the manpower to do all of this? Probably not. Does that matter? No.

Will it cause delays in products getting to consumers? Probably. Does it matter? No.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 04:31 PM
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Does that matter? No.



I am curious, why doesn't it matter? Not enough manpower means something could get through the inspections. Delays could mean rises in prices as demand goes up.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 04:36 PM
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Here is your first victoms.



WASHINGTON - The Coast Guard denied entry to three foreign ships that planned to enter U.S. ports on Thursday, the first day ships were required to comply with new international security rules.

Coast Guardsmen began boarding every foreign-flagged vessel that arrived to make sure they met the new standards.

The ships denied entry were a freight vessel, an industrial vessel and a drilling vessel. They had wanted to call on port facilities in the Gulf of Mexico, the Upper Northeastern Coast and in Guam, according to Adm. Larry Hereth.

They did not have certificates signed by their flag countries saying they complied with the new rules.

news.yahoo.com.../ap/20040701/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/coast_guard_interview



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 04:41 PM
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Originally posted by Trojanex

Does that matter? No.



I am curious, why doesn't it matter? Not enough manpower means something could get through the inspections. Delays could mean rises in prices as demand goes up.


I should have clarified. I mean to say that if one suggest that these measures should not be implemented because they are not foolproof, then such a person is foolish. This is directed toward people who would argue because it can't be done (perfectly) we shouldn't bother wasting our time.

If that was not what you meant, then I apologize.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 09:22 PM
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Thanks for the clarification. While I think the new procedures are a great idea, I couldn't help but wonder if the current state of the CG allows for these procedures to be carried out in a manner so that they become effective. Effective doesnt mean perfectly, in my book. I was under the impression that the CG was somewhat small, in comparison to the size of the job they are currently tasked with. So, my questions were that of effectiveness, and what could be done to improve the effectiveness if they (the CG) were simply too small to take on the task. Forgive me if I did not make that clear in my original post (I don't think I did, personally). On the matter of delays... after some reading, I dont see this becoming a problem in reference to goods getting to the consumer in a timely manner. In fact, I am all for some certain levels of delays as long as they are for the right reasons (terror prevention in this case).



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by Trojanex
Thanks for the clarification. While I think the new procedures are a great idea, I couldn't help but wonder if the current state of the CG allows for these procedures to be carried out in a manner so that they become effective. Effective doesnt mean perfectly, in my book. I was under the impression that the CG was somewhat small, in comparison to the size of the job they are currently tasked with. So, my questions were that of effectiveness, and what could be done to improve the effectiveness if they (the CG) were simply too small to take on the task. Forgive me if I did not make that clear in my original post (I don't think I did, personally). On the matter of delays... after some reading, I dont see this becoming a problem in reference to goods getting to the consumer in a timely manner. In fact, I am all for some certain levels of delays as long as they are for the right reasons (terror prevention in this case).


I understand. I'll tell you, I don't really know all that much about the Coast Guard, such as how large it is, what kind of equipment they have, etc. They used to have a show on late night local TV were I used to live that was like "Cops" except for the CG. The would track drug ships and board them, confiscate the the contraband and arrest those on board, stuff like that. But other than that, I don't know.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 09:58 PM
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Does the CG have the manpower to enforce regulations as strict as these?


No, they don't...


are they feasible?


No, they aren't...


are the rules going to cause delays in products, etc. getting to consumers?


Yes and no... Yes for those that actually get boarded, no, because many still won't. I suspect the Coast Guard will not fully follow the mandate, though it looks good on paper and to the voters....

This is from a former Coast Guard military brat mind you, hehe...(even had the Senator letters to go to the Academy, but damn health reasons kept me out....)



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 10:02 PM
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Thanks, Gaz...

Your answers are right along with the conclusions I have drawn. It seems to me they (the CG) are as stretched now as they could be. I see no way they can possibly handle every single ship that comes into port. But hey, like you said, it looks good on paper!



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 10:37 PM
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I think the new rules are needed. Since it will be harder for terriorist to get in the country via plane, it is only logical... they will come in on the ports and through easy border crossings. Even if it does cause delays. Better to be safe than sorry.



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