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(If you have) Arsenic in your drinking water

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posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 07:17 AM
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....You never know :

How can I find out if arsenic is in my drinking water?

Arsenic in drinking water is odorless, tasteless and colorless. The only way to tell if arsenic is present is to test for it. If you decide to test your well, the DEP recommends that you use a laboratory that is DEP-certified to conduct low level arsenic analyses. There are a number of commercial labs in NJ and other states that can measure arsenic as low as 1-2 µg/L in drinking water samples. Additional laboratories in the state are NJDEP-certified to conduct arsenic tests using other analytical techniques that measure arsenic from above 2 µg/L. You can call NJDEP’s Office of Quality Assurance at (609) 292-3950 for more information on laboratories certified to test for arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic testing in
drinking water generally costs less than $50 per sample. The laboratory will instruct you as to how to collect the water sample, or they will collect it themselves.

It is recommended that you conduct two tests to confirm the concentrations. Even if the initial test is low, it is useful to conduct the second test to confirm the results.


Link : www.state.nj.us...

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edit on Fri Nov 26 2010 by DontTreadOnMe because: Mod Edit: All Caps – Please Review This Link.




posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 09:01 AM
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When I sold my house in NJ, since I was on well water, I needed certification that the water was safe. The well cert companies in NJ test for literally every known contaminent. Luckily my well was fine. Unfortunately, about 10 miles west there's an old Nike missle base that had a fire in the 60's and some Plutonium leaked into the underground acquifier. I understand the toxic plume is now spreading off the confines of the base and has the potential to contaminate wells locally. Anyone who lives in western Monmouth and northwestern Ocean county should worry about that.



posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 09:06 AM
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Originally posted by peter_kandra
When I sold my house in NJ, since I was on well water, I needed certification that the water was safe. The well cert companies in NJ test for literally every known contaminent. Luckily my well was fine. Unfortunately, about 10 miles west there's an old Nike missle base that had a fire in the 60's and some Plutonium leaked into the underground acquifier. I understand the toxic plume is now spreading off the confines of the base and has the potential to contaminate wells locally. Anyone who lives in western Monmouth and northwestern Ocean county should worry about that.


That is so important info my friend ! ....can you tell more details please ?

I am in NJ, so I must know. Thanks.



posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Sure. I'll find some links and post them. I lived in Jackson, but the Nike base was in Plumsted along route 539 between 537 and 70.



posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by peter_kandra
 


Here's a link with some background info on the fire itself:
www.strangeusa.com...

Here's a link about a toxic chemical plume:
www.phillyburbs.com... -in-the-pines.html

I'll have to find the articles I read in the past about a plutonium plume in the ground water.
I did find a different article about tritium leaking from Oyster Creek though (makes me kind of glad I moved out of NJ):
www.boston.com...

Lastly, here's a 101 page document on the cleanup of the site from back in the 90's.
www.dtic.mil...



posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by peter_kandra
 


Thanks Peter, I started to spread you important info between my friends around here in NJ. At least we spot one of them in that area and we are warning him now.




posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


No problem. The military will undoubtably deny any plutonium leak until hell freezes, but the fire department would have been putting thousands and thousands of gallons of water on that fire to put it out, and nowhere to go but down for that water. I'm pretty sure they would have kept hoses on it for a day or 2 to make sure it didn't flare back up. Here's a small blurb referencing the loss of plutonium:

On June 7, 1960, disaster struck at missile shelter 204. A defective helium vessel ruptured, causing an explosion and a fire. During the 30-minute fire, the IM-99A BOMARC missile and nuclear warhead burned causing the loss of approximately 1.0 to 1.5 kilograms of plutonium. Part of the loss may have been due to the water run-off from the fire fighting effort.

themilitarystandard.com...



posted on Nov, 26 2010 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by peter_kandra
 


I always wondered why houses were a lot cheaper in those counties. I got to thank you again for all that info.



posted on Dec, 5 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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